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Beef

Smoked Prime Rib Roast

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Smoked Prime Rib Roast will be the crowning glory of any table. Never underestimate the power of a perfectly roasted hunk of beef. I infuse this beautiful cut with flavor by slow smoking before finishing with a sear for that beautiful exterior crust that will have people fighting for the end piece. Put your friendly butcher to good use by having them slice the roast off of the bone and tie it back on for you. I like to keep the ribs for myself and have a little meat treat while I’m slicing the rest of the roast for my guests!  Slow smoked for amazing flavor and then flash roasted for a rich exterior crust, my method ensures perfect results every time!

What is a Prime Rib Roast?

A rib roast is a large cut of beef that comes from the primal rib. The entire cut contains 7 rib bones and a whole bunch of marbled, tender muscle and can weigh up to 30 pounds. Rib eye steaks are individually sliced from the rib roast. The label “prime” rib roast refers to the grade of beef. Prime is typically the highest grade available at your butcher or big box warehouse. Most grocery store butchers carry the next grade down, which is choice, and below that you will see select grade beef. While these lower grades aren’t technically “prime rib” most recipes treat them the same.

The grade of beef makes a BIG difference in your final product, with prime grade having additional marbling which means more flavor, tenderness, and moisture from that rendering fat. It also means a big difference in the final price of your roast. If you’ve got a big budget and are willing to pay the extra cash, go for the prime grade and treat yo’self! Especially if you are using this recipe for smoked prime rib roast. It’ll be worth every dollar. If you purchase a choice grade roast, you will still have outstanding results, so don’t fret or overthink it. The magic of this recipe is in the method and the final product will still be amazingly delicious and tender!

How Much Smoked Prime Rib Per Person?

Plan 1 pound of uncooked prime rib roast per person. This will account for any necessary trimming and volume lost during the cooking process, as well as leave you with enough meat leftover for sandwiches the next day. It seems like a lot, but that’s because it is. Prime Rib is an indulgence and I want my guests to feel well fed when they leave my table. If you’ve got kids, they will definitely eat less so plan accordingly.

How Long to Smoke a Prime Rib?

Plan 35 minutes per pound at 225 degrees F for smoking a rare roast. 40 minutes per pound at 225 degrees F for smoking a medium roast. Don’t forget to allow at least 30 minutes of rest time and another 15 minutes or so for the high heat sear before serving.

Tools Needed to Make Smoked Prime Rib?

I have a few tried and true products that I use to churn out a perfect smoked prime rib roast every time. First up is the type of grill I use. I’ve got a Camp Chef pellet smoker with an attached sear box, you can read my full review HERE. This allows me the versatility to slow smoke a roast and then sear the exterior for a great crust without overcooking anything.

I also rely heavily on good, accurate internal thermometers. For a roast this expensive, I wouldn’t trust anything other than my Thermoworks thermometers. I have the Thermoworks Smoke, which is a remote probe thermometer that can remotely tell me the temperature of both my roast and the grill simultaneously. I also take my Thermapen MK4 with me to spot check other parts of the roast to ensure even cooking.

ThermoWorks Deals

Prime Rib Side Dish Ideas:

Smoked Prime Rib Roast makes an unbelievable main dish, but you’ve got to have great sides to round out the meal. I’m including links to my favorite recipes that you can cook alongside your prime rib roast on the smoker. Just click the image to head to the recipe.

 

The Ultimate Smoked Prime Rib Recipes
Smoked Prime Rib Roast

Print Recipe

Smoked Prime Rib Roast will be the crowning glory of any table.

Servings Prep Time
10-12 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes/pound 35 minutes of resting time
Servings Prep Time
10-12 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes/pound 35 minutes of resting time
The Ultimate Smoked Prime Rib Recipes
Smoked Prime Rib Roast

Print Recipe

Smoked Prime Rib Roast will be the crowning glory of any table.

Servings Prep Time
10-12 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes/pound 35 minutes of resting time
Servings Prep Time
10-12 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
35 minutes/pound 35 minutes of resting time

Instructions

  1. Preheat your grill to 225 degrees F.

  2. While the grill is warming up, prepare your roast. Trim any excess fat from the top of the roast down to 1/4 inch thick.

  3. In a small bowl combine the mustard, Worcestershire sauce and garlic. Slather the entire roast with the mustard mixture and season liberally with the salt and pepper.

  4. Place the roast on the grill and close the lid. Smoke until the internal temperature of the roast reaches 120 degrees F for Rare or 130 degrees F for Medium. For a rare, bone-in roast, plan on 35 minutes per pound of prime rib.

  5. Remove the roast to a cutting board, cover the roast with foil, and allow to rest for 20 minutes.

  6. While the roast is resting, increase the temperature of your grill to 400 degrees F.

  7. Once the grill is up to temperature, return the roast to the grill and sear until you reach your desired internal temperature. Pull the roast off at 130 for rare, 135 for medium rare, 140 for medium. This process should go quickly, so keep an eye on your temperature.

  8. Remove your roast to the cutting board and let the meat rest for at least 15 minutes before slicing and serving.

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Smoked Prime Rib Roast was originally posted at https://heygrillhey.com/recipe/smoked-prime-rib-roast/ by Hey Grill

 

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BBQ Tips

9 Leftover Beef Brisket Recipes

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After smoking a brisket, no matter how lip smacking delicious it was, there are almost always leftovers. A brisket yields a lot of meat.

If you are looking for some ideas for how to use your leftover brisket, then check out this list of 9 great ideas to get your mouth watering (again).

1) Brisket Grilled Cheese Sandwich (You won’t need an afternoon snack if you have this for lunch)

spicysouthernkitchen.com

Think of all the very best comfort food items. Creamy, melted cheese perhaps? How about warm crispy bread, lightly toasted? And don’t forget juicy, flavor packed beef, smoked to perfection. Can you imagine all of these things combined into one?

Welcome to the brisket grilled cheese sandwich.

After all the work you put into smoking that delicious brisket, it’s nice to make something really easy the next day.

You only need two or three slices of brisket to make this special sandwich, and you can have this warm, filling meal ready in around 15 minutes.

Ingredients:

  • 8 slices Italian bread or Texas toast
  • butter
  • 1 cup heaping shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup heaping shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 2-3 slices leftover brisket, shredded

You can find the recipe for the brisket grilled cheese sandwich here.

 

2) Breakfast Brisket Hash

traegergrills.com

Not only is this hash a delicious way to use your leftover brisket, it is also loaded with protein. If you feel like a lazy morning, this meal will likely cover you for both breakfast and lunch.

This meal hails from Ireland originally, and there surely is nothing more comforting on a fresh morning than the smells of brisket, peppers, onion and garlic sizzling away in the pan.

The ingredients in this dish are readily available, and if you can cook yourself a great brisket then whipping up this breakfast hash will be a breeze.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups beef brisket, cooked and shredded
  • 2 cups hashbrown potatoes, cooked
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup green bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
  • 3 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper

Grab the recipe here, and call all your friends around for a delicious, lazy Sunday breakfast.

 

3) Four Ingredient Breakfast Quesadillas (you can have these ready in 20 mins!)

heidishomecooking.com

If last nights barbecue left your cupboards a bit bare, there is nothing to fear. These breakfast quesadillas only require 4 ingredients, and even they are negotiable.

For instance, if you have some other meat left over that you want to use up, it will taste great as well.

Similarly, it doesn’t matter exactly what sauce you have floating around, as long as you have enough to generously coat that meat, then all is good.

Aside from that, all you need is some cheese and tortillas, and you’re good to go.

Ingredients:

  • 12 burrito-sized tortillas
  • 1-2 lbs brisket
  • 1-2 cups BBQ sauce
  • 16 oz shredded Colby Jack cheese
  • Cooking Spray

Check out the recipe here and play with it according to what’s in your cupboards.

 

4) Smoked Brisket Shepherd’s Pie with Jalapeno Cheddar Mashed Potatoes

countrycleaver.com

Just by reading its name you can tell this is a proper recipe in its own right. If you find yourself needing to entertain back to back, then have this one at the ready.

With the addition of carrots, broccoli, peas etc there is a fair serving of veggies in this dish. Now I am not going so far as to say it falls into the “health food” category, but “hearty” would be a fair description.

The jalapeno cheddar mash is a great twist on a classic mashed taters as well.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds Chopped Smoked Brisket
  • 3 Carrots, sliced or chopped evenly
  • 1 head Broccoli, cut into bite sized florets
  • 2 cups frozen Mixed Vegetables, corn, peas, etc
  • 1 Red or Sweet Onion, minced
  • 2 Tbsp Butter
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 ½ cup Beef Broth
  • 3-4 Tbsp Flour
  • 2 pounds baby red potatoes, quartered
  • 1 ½ cups shredded Cheddar Cheese
  • 1 jalapeno finely minced, seeds removed for less heat
  • 4 Tbsp Butter, cut into cubes
  • ½ cup Sour Cream
  • ¼ cup Whipping Cream or Half and Half
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Planning of a big weekend of entertaining? Then head down and grab your brisket, and while it is smoking, check out the smoked brisket shepherd’s pie recipe here.

 

5) Beef Brisket Street Tacos

rockymountaincooking.com

Tacos are the perfect size meal if you want something that fills you up yet is not going to leave you with (more) leftovers. Make just as much as you want and eat it when you feel peckish.

This recipe calls for pickled onions. Of course you can grab them right off the store shelf, but for those who love a bit of DIY, the recipe for pickling the onions is included in the recipe for the tacos.

Aside from frying up the brisket and whipping up the avocado cream sauce (which sounds amazing) there is nothing much else to do than heat up the tortillas, then pile those ingredients on.

Ingredients:

  • olive oil
  • 2 cups leftover brisket or pot roast (click on link in post for the brisket recipe)
  • ½ cup chopped green chilies
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ tsp Cheyenne pepper
  • 1 tsp Mexican oregano
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper

Get the recipe here.

 

6) Brisket Stroganoff (ultimate comfort food in 30 minutes)

apleasantlittlekitchen.com

The mention of beef stroganoff (or brisket stroganoff, in this case) brings to mind the words creamy, meaty, and buttery.

Pile it on pasta, or mash, and you are in for a real treat.

Generally, the ingredients in this dish are those you would typically have on hand, but you might want to check that you have some Chianti, as it is required along with worcestershire sauce to deglaze the pan.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups Chianti
  • 2 1/2 cups chopped smoked brisket, click here for recipe
  • 3/4 cup sour cream (room temperature)
  • cooked egg noodles (or your favorite pasta)
  • fresh parsley, chopped (for topping)

Have a look at the recipe here.

 

7) Leftovers Cottage Pie

homeandplate.com

Not only will this classic cottage pie recipe work beautifully with brisket, but also with leftover lamb, chicken or even that ground beef you need to defrost and use before it expires.

Really, though, we are mainly interested in making it with leftover brisket, as the flavor packed into the brisket, along with the easily shreddable texture of the meat after smoking it makes it a pleasure to cook with.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups cooked leftover beef brisket or roast, shredded and chopped
  • 3 cups mashed potatoes (leftover or store-bought)
  • 1 cup frozen vegetables
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

If you are looking for a quick, filling and tasty midweek meal that everyone will enjoy, check out the recipe here and pull out the leftover brisket ready to go.

 

8) Smoked Beef Brisket Chilli (expertly paired with the perfect wine – if your out of beer)

vindulge.com

This is more than just a tasty chilli, it is an award winning chilli! So brace yourself for something special when you serve this one up.

This recipe plays to the smoky flavors you can expect from a brisket, with the addition of bacon and chipotle sauce giving this chili a truly distinctive flavor profile.

There is quite a bit of spice in this recipe. If you aren’t a fan of too much heat, perhaps hold back a little at first, and add more spices as you go. After you have cooked this one a couple of times you will find the sweet spot.

Ingredients:

  • 3 slices of bacon, diced
  • 1 large onion, about 2 cups, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 2 ½ cups leftover smoked beef brisket, cut up into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 tablespoons chili powder*
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • ½ tablespoon dry chipotle seasoning** or the equivalent in canned chipotle in adobo sauce, adjustamount to your heat preference. A little goes a long way
  • ½ tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1 12 oz bottle beer
  • ¼ cup coffee, cold leftover coffee from your morning pot
  • 1 15 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 1 15 oz can tomato sauce
  • ½ can black beans, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • ½ can kidney beans, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • ½ can corn, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • 1 small, 4 oz can diced green chili

You can find the recipe here. If you are feeling extra fancy, scroll down past the chili recipe to discover the perfect wine to accompany it.

 

9) Sweet and Spicy Brisket Baked Beans

addapinch.com

Reimagine baked beans with the addition of spices, sauces and of course leftover brisket.

Far from an emergency dinner on toast, these baked beans are liable to steal the show next time you have a family dinner.

All you need to do is chop up some extra veggies for heat and flavor, squeeze in some sauces for richness and a little bit of sweet and of course add the brisket to beef them right up.

Let them bubble for around 45 minutes and you have an absolutely mindblowing side dish – or meal. Up to you.

Ingredients:

  • 3 1/2 cups prepared baked beans or 1 28-ounce can
  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon stone ground mustard
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 pound smoked brisket chopped
  • 3 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 bell pepper seeded and chopped
  • 2 jalapeno peppers seeded and chopped
  • salt and pepper

Find the recipe here.

 

Wrapping it up

There is so much more you can do with leftover brisket than whack it on a sandwich (although that is delicious too).

Follow these recipes to the letter, or simply use them as some inspiration the next time you find yourself blessed with leftover brisket.

If this post has inspired you to cook a brisket, we’ve got some great guides to help out:

We hope you found this article helpful. Do you have any other great leftover brisket ideas? Let us know in the comment section below. And if you like our list, be sure to share it!

The post 9 Leftover Beef Brisket Recipes appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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9 Leftover Beef Brisket Recipes was originally posted at https://www.smokedbbqsource.com/9-leftover-beef-brisket-recipes/ by

 

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Barbeque Guides

Should You Cook Brisket Fat Side Up or Down?

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There are some topics in the world of barbecue that have never really been put to bed. Whether to cook your brisket fat side up or down is one of them.

If you are new to barbecuing, this may be a burning question that you have not been brave enough to ask out loud.

Or, it could be that there are so many conflicting opinions out there that you have given up on finding a straight answer.

Let’s get to the bottom of this.

What Is the Debate About?

Briskets have two distinct sides – one is covered in fat, and another is bare meat.

Aside from these two distinct sides, briskets are made up of two distinct muscles. The Point and the Flat. The pointed end tends to have a thicker covering of fat, while on the flat end the covering of fat is a little thinner.

Sometimes pitmasters will cut the brisket in half before they cook, but most times it’st best left whole.

But the real point of contention, is which way that fat should be facing. Up or down.

 

Why Cook Brisket Fat Side Up?

Advocates of cooking fat side up claim that the fat will “melt” into the meat, making it moist and juicy.

However, this is a myth.

The truth is that meat cannot absorb fat. Instead, the fat melts and runs off the meat into the drip pan, taking any seasoning you may have put on the meat with it.

To make matters worse, cooking fat side up won’t leave your brisket looking its best.The fat will not form a uniform bark like the bare meat would, leaving you with a not-so-appetizing looking brisket.

However cooking brisket fat side up is not a complete no no. If you use a horizontal offset smoker, or any other smoker wherein the heat comes from above, cooking fat side up is the way to go.

We will have a closer look at why under the section “Where is your heat coming from?”

 

Why Many Say Fat Side Down is Better

Most of the time, the fat side down team have got it right.

Because the fat is on the bottom, when it melts it will not wash the seasoning away, and the bark retains all the flavors you added.

Additionally, the smoke produced as the fat hits the hot coals will add a great flavor to your meat.

In most cookers, the heat comes from underneath the meat. Fat acts as an insulator. So as your meat cooks it is protected from the intense heat of the fire by the fat that does not melt away. As a result, your meat doesn’t dry out.

Also, the top of the brisket will form a uniform bark, leaving you with a brisket which looks great.

 

Where’s your heat coming from?

We have touched on this already, but when deciding whether to cook your brisket fat side up or down the determining factor really is the origin of the heat for your cooker.

Most of the time, the heat comes from the bottom (like on a Weber Smokey Mountain Bullet Smoker), so fat side down is the way to go.

But there are exceptions.

For example, horizontal offset smokers send the heat in from above. In that case you want to use those insulative properties of the fat cap to shield the meat from the top. Thus, fat side up is the way to go.

So have a look at your cooker, determine where the heat is coming from and you are most of the way to working out which way to sit your brisket.

It is still a good idea to check that the unprotected side of the meat is not drying out. If it is, you can always wrap the brisket in foil or butchers paper roughly halfway through the cook.

 

What The Pros Say About Fat Up or Down

You can find experts who sit on both sides of this debate. But now that we know that it largely depends on the type of cooker you use, this makes sense.

For instance, Malcom Reed of ‘How To BBQ Right.com’ likes to cook his everyday ‘eating’ briskets fat side up.

He explains his reason why like this:

Malcom Reed, Easy Smoked Brisket Recipe

“At a contest I would cook brisket fat side down the entire time. But you have to remember with my competition briskets I’ve trimmed off most of the fat, and I’ve injected it with at least 16oz of liquid….

For this “Eating Brisket” we’re not worried about the extra fat or what it looks like after it’s cooked, so I’m going to cook it fat side up the entire time.

I want the final product to have a “beefy” flavor but not be enhanced or artificial. ”

We had a look at the smoker he used in the recipe, and it does appear to be a horizontal offset style smoker, so the direction from which the heat comes in has likely also had a role in this decision.

Similarly, Aaron Franklin, known for cooking a mean brisket, goes fat side up.

However, he also uses an smoker with a heat source from above. You can follow Aaron Franklin’s Brisket Guide here.

But the fat does have a flavor all of its own, and when it drips onto the coals it can impart that flavor to the meat. Meathead Goldwyn, of amazingribs.com says:

“And what about the fat dripping into the fire and being resurrected as flavorful droplets mixed in with smoke? I save the fat cap and put it on the grate over the fire and let it drip away.”

Cooking your brisket fat side down will have a similar outcome, with the fat dripping directly onto the hot coals, and the resulting smoke flavoring your meat.

Wrapping It Up

So no, there is not a ‘one size fits all’ answer to this question of fat up or fat down.But we have discovered some vital facts.

No, the fat will not penetrate your meat as it melts, but it will wash off your rub.
Yes, the smoke coming off the melted fat hitting the coals will flavor your meat.

And yes, the fat will act as an insulative barrier between the heat source and the meat, protecting it from drying out.

The long and short of it? Know your smoker, identify where the heat is coming from, and place the fat cap between the heat and the meat.

We hope you have found this article helpful. Do you have any additional questions or suggestions? Make sure you let us know in the comments section below. And if you did enjoy this article, be sure to share it!

The post Should You Cook Brisket Fat Side Up or Down? appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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Should You Cook Brisket Fat Side Up or Down? was originally posted at https://www.smokedbbqsource.com/should-you-cook-brisket-fat-side-up-or-down/ by

 

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Beef

Perfect Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak

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This Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak is one of the most perfectly cooked and delicious pieces of beef I’ve ever had the privilege of eating. Slow smoked, then seared for a perfectly pink and tender steak! Not to mention that giant bone curving off of a perfectly cooked slab of steak looks totally amazing.

How to Reverse Sear a Steak:

First, make sure you watch the video (just below this paragraph). It gives you a great visual aid to the process. To reverse sear, the tomahawk steak is cooked at a lower temperature on the smoker while the meat slowly comes up in temperature. Using a thermometer to test for internal temperature, the steak is removed from the grill about 10-15 degrees from desired doneness and the grill is then cranked up to high or a cast iron skillet is preheated. The steaks are returned to the smoking hot grill or skillet and quickly seared on each side for the perfect crunchy finish and beautiful char we all love on our steak. This method ensures that the inside of the steak is perfectly cooked to your desired doneness from top to bottom opposed to having dry edges on the outside and a raw hunk of meat in the middle (or worst case scenario, dry and charred all the way through.) The most important thing to perfecting this method is having a quick read internal thermometer. I have a Thermoworks MK4 and I use it to get the perfect steaks every time.

What is a Tomahawk Steak?

The cut: A tomahawk steak is a piece of tender rib meat (also known as a rib-eye steak) that hasn’t been fully removed from the bone. In face, the rib bone is left almost fully in tact and still attached to the meat! Rib eyes are one of my favorite steaks to grill, and while the long bone doesn’t add anything in terms of flavor, it looks amazingly awesome and makes a stunning presentation. Oftentimes, butchers will also cut the tomahawk steaks more generously thick with the bone still attached. Some people scoff at paying for the bone, but to justify the additional cost in my mind, I let my dog gnaw on the smoked bone for a little while after dinner. We both got a little treat!

Where to buy a Tomahawk Steak?

To get your hands on one of these behemoth beauties, you may need to do a little searching. I am SO lucky and have a grocery store, a butcher, and a Costco nearby that all carry tomahawk steaks. The grocery store has them pre-cut in the butcher’s case, Costco has them sliced and packaged and ready to go, but my favorite place by far is to get them from my butcher. He will cut one for me from the center of the rack (with the biggest spinalis muscle on top for the best flavor) and as thick as I like. Once you have a place where you can get a tomahawk steak, here’s what else you need to look for.

Color- Look for steaks that are bright red with no dark or brownish spots. The lights in the meat case are different and designed to make meat look better. Pull your steak out of the case or away from the others and look at them in the regular light. If your butcher is cutting them for you, you should have an amazingly fresh product.

Marbling- Marbling is the amount of fat laced throughout your meat. You may be trained to think that fat=bad, but giiiiirl, you gotta change your state of mind. The marbled fat in a steak means flavor. Yummy, delicious, melt in your mouth flavor. For rib-eye steaks, I always try and pick a steak with a large spinalis muscle on the top part of the steak and a well-marbled eye in the center.

Steak Seasoning:

The Rub: Of course, you can use good old Kosher salt and cracked black pepper on a yummy steak (it will always be a favorite of mine) but if you’re feeling adventurous give my Homemade Steak Rub a try. This steak rub was eaten on some wicked delicious reverse seared rib-eyes during the infamous Steak and Cake celebration when I broke my first Guinness World Record! No matter what you use to season, remember to be liberal. Tomahawk steaks are notoriously thick and you’ll need enough seasoning to account for that big cut of beef.

Reverse Sear Tomahawk Steak
Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak

Print Recipe

This Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak is slow smoked, then seared for a perfectly pink and tender steak!

Servings Prep Time
2 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1.5 hours 2 hours
Servings Prep Time
2 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1.5 hours 2 hours
Reverse Sear Tomahawk Steak
Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak

Print Recipe

This Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak is slow smoked, then seared for a perfectly pink and tender steak!

Servings Prep Time
2 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1.5 hours 2 hours
Servings Prep Time
2 people 5 minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
1.5 hours 2 hours

Instructions

  1. Remove the steaks from the refrigerator approximately 2 hours before cooking to allow to come to room temperature.

  2. Preheat your grill or smoker to 225 degrees F. I used oak wood for this steak because I wanted a pronounced smoke flavor, but more mild woods like hickory or alder work great too.

  3. Season your steak liberally on all sides with the homemade steak rub (or with salt and pepper). Make sure to press the seasonings into the meat with your hand opposed to just sprinkling them on.

  4. Place the steak on the grill grate and close the lid. Cook the steaks at 225 degrees F until the internal temperature reaches 115 degrees F. Use an internal thermometer to check the temperature.

  5. Remove the steak from the grill to a separate plate. Preheat a cast iron skillet over medium high heat. Drop the butter into the pan and when it's melted and bubbling, it's time to sear the steaks. If you're searing at a higher heat on your grill, brush each side of your steak with melted butter.

  6. Place the tomahawk steak in the hot pan or on to the grill and sear each side for approximately 2-3 minutes or until desired doneness. Pull your steak at 125 degrees F for rare, 135 degrees F for medium rare, 145 degrees F for medium, 155 degrees for medium well, or 160 for well done (but please just give this one a go at medium rare… it really is the best).

  7. Let the steaks rest for 10-15 minutes before slicing and eating.

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Perfect Reverse Seared Tomahawk Steak was originally posted at https://heygrillhey.com/recipe/perfect-reverse-seared-tomahawk-steak/ by Hey Grill

 

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