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Smoked Buffalo Chicken Potato Skins

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The absence of going to bars this year due to the pandemic has also meant a lessoning of the type of food I usually partake in while downing a few beers. From time to time, I've been making things likes wings and sliders at home, but it's not quite the same and never in the vast assortment of goods I end up ordering while out and under the influence. So when my brother-in-law requested a night of pub food while we were vacationing together over the summer, I was only too happy to oblige. On that evening, I pulled out my recipe for potato skins, which I haven't made in a really long time and became instantly re-enamored with them, so much so that I had a hankering to cook them again just a month later while back at home. This time though I took things a little further than the standard cheddar and bacon topping and filled them with smoked buffalo chicken, and they were every bit as delicious as that sounds.

For your average appetizer, these represent a bit of extra effort, but if you approach them like I did and make them when you might already have the grill and/or smoker going for other things, they're a nice bonus to a meal. The extra time really comes from the need to smoke the breasts, which you could easily shortcut by picking up barbecued chicken from a smokehouse or swap in one of those rotisserie birds available at most supermarkets. Of course, doing every step at home allows for close attention to details, and for me, one of those is ensuring that the chicken, which ends up being cooked twice, remains as juicy as possible in the end dish. To help get me to that outcome, I started by brining bone-in chicken breasts to inject some added moisture in the meat.

After brining, the breasts went in to the smoker that I had running at 225°F with a chuck of cherry wood on the coals. You can see the ribs I also had on at the same time, which was the real reason I had the smoker fired up that day. Getting the smoker up and running for just a couple of chicken breasts might feel a bit excessive, so I wrote the final recipe to include the grill too—if you go with the grill, just use a small amount of charcoal for a low heat fire and cook using indirect heat.

Another way I set out to ensure the final chicken would be moist was to undercook it from the usually recommended 165°F. That temperature is the FDA standard because it's the point at which most nasty bacteria die instantaneously, but those same bacteria also die at lower temperatures, it just takes longer. I pulled the breasts out when they hit around 145°F, and at that temperature it takes just over nine minutes for common food-based bacteria to die, and since the chicken was going to rest for more than 15 minutes before I pulled it, combined with a little extra carryover cooking, it would be just as safe to eat and a whole lot juicier than chicken cooked to 165°F.

With the chicken done, it was on to the potatoes. Over my many years of recipe development, I've tried over and over again to use the microwave to speed up spud cooking, and usually the end results are never as good as if they were solely roasted. The one exception I've found has been for potato skins. This is due to the fact that the potatoes will still be cooked a lengthy amount of time on the grill, which renders the exterior nicely crisp, while a large portion of the interior is scooped away and discarded, so there's not a huge amount of flesh left to make a noticeable textural difference.

After zapping the russets in the microwave for eight minutes, I transferred them to the grill to finish cooking. I needed to cook them until they could be pierced with a paring knife and there would be little to no resistance, which took about 20 minutes more using a freshly lit batch of coals and indirect heat. Depending on the size of your spuds, this could take longer or shorter, so it's a good practice to start testing after about fifteen minutes, then every five minutes there after.

It was during this roasting time that I prepared the buffalo chicken filling. I used the standard Frank's and butter combo, going in heavier with the hot sauce, and then adding in the meat that I had pulled from the bone. I took a taste and the chicken was a juicy as could be and with a nice background smokiness, but the heat was not as prominent as I thought it would need to be to create a little mouth burn in the end dish. So I added a bit of cayenne into the mix and that fixed things up nicely.

Once the potatoes were done, I removed them from the grill, split them open, and let the rest to cool off. I was losing the light I needed for ideal photos, so I attempted to scoop out all but about 1/2-inch of flesh while they were still pretty hot and ended up mangling more than one spud because of it. Still, I had enough to venture forth and did so by next brushing the potatoes all over with melted butter, seasoning them with salt and pepper, and putting them back on the still hot grill. This second roasting session is meant to really crisp up and lightly brown the potatoes, making them the ideal potato skin vessel.

They seemed pretty perfect after seven minutes, at which time I finished them up by filling each potato boat with the chicken, topping with cheddar cheese, then replacing the grill lid and letting them cook until the cheese was well melted. All that was left to do to them now was to plate them up, squeeze on a bit of ranch dressing, and garnish with chives.

I've tried this potato skin method with many different filling variations, and it always delivers. The multiple roasts on the potatoes renders them with a skin that has a nice crispness to it and enough creamy innards to add heft and more potato character to the final dish than many potato skins I get at restaurants. This particular filler was high on the flavor scale with that tangy, rich, and spicy buffalo sauce which got bonus boosts from the mellow smokiness and sharp cheddar cheese.. I'm a ranch man, so the herbal and garlicky tang was the fitting pairing for me, but if you're of the blue cheese persuasion, by all means, use a blue cheese sauce instead. Now that I've let these potato skins back into my life twice this year, I keep thinking of new topping ideas and imagine the longer I'm stuck at home over the winter, the more likely they are to make repeat appearances.
Published on Thu Dec 31, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe

Yield 4-6 servings

Prep 30 Minutes
Inactive 1 Hour
Cook 2 Hours 10 Minutes
Total 3 Hours 40 Minutes

Ingredients
For the Chicken
2 quarts cold water
1/3 cup Kosher salt
1/4 cup white sugar
2 lbs bone-in chicken breasts
1/4 cup unsalted butter
1/2 cup Frank's Red Hot Sauce
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper, plus more to taste
 
For the Potatoes
4 large russet potatoes, scrubbed
4 tablespoons unsalted butter, melted
8 ounces cheddar cheese, shredded
1/3 cup ranch dressing
3 tablespoons finely sliced chives
Procedure
To make the chicken: In a medium bowl, whisk together water, salt, and sugar until solids are dissolved. Place chicken breasts in brine and refrigerate for 30 minutes. Remove chicken from brine and pat dry with paper towels.
Fire up smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunk of smoking wood when at temperature. When wood is ignited and producing smoke, place chicken in smoker or grill, skin side up. Smoke until an instant read thermometer reads 145°F when inserted into thickest part of breast, about 1 1/2 hours. Remove from smoker and let sit until cool enough to handle. Remove skin and pull meat. Discard bones.
Melt butter in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Add in hot sauce and cayenne pepper and whisk to combine. Add in pulled chicken and toss to coat. Remove from heat and set aside. Adjust heat with more cayenne pepper to taste.
To make the potatoes: Prick potatoes all over with a fork. Microwave potatoes on high for 4 minutes. Flip potatoes over and microwave on high for an additional 4 minutes.
Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place potatoes on cool side of grill close to, but not over, the coals. Cover and cook potatoes until a paring knife glides easily through the flesh, about 20 minutes. Remove potatoes from grill, slice each in half lengthwise, and let sit until cool enough to handle.
Use a spoon to scoop out and discard the flesh of the potatoes, leaving a 1/2-inch layer of potato flesh on the inside of each skin. Brush the potatoes all over with melted butter and season with salt and pepper. Place potatoes back on cool side of grill, cover, and let cook until light golden brown and crisp, about 7 minutes.
Fill each potato with buffalo chicken and top with cheese. Cover and continue to cook until the cheese is fully melted, about 5 minutes more. Remove from grill and let cool for 5 minutes. Top with ranch dressing and chives. Serve immediately.

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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Smoked Buffalo Chicken Potato Skins
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/smoked-buffalo-chicken-potato-skins-recipe
Published Date: 12/31/20

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Introducing Picanha (Fat Cap Sirloin Roast)

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The French call it culotte, which means something like “britches.” Here in America, we know it as fat cap top sirloin. (Other names for this singular cut include rump cover, rump cap, and sirloin cap.)

But the cut reaches its apotheosis in Brazil, where it goes by the name of picanha (pronounced pee-CAHN-ya). Generations of gauchos and grill masters have raised the preparation, grilling, and degustation of this extraordinarily flavorful meat to the level of art.

Picanha, named after a pole used by Spanish and Portuguese farmers to herd cattle, comes from top of the rump—a triangular steak-like roast with a big beefy flavor that’s inversely proportional to its affordable price tag. What makes it so extraordinary is the thick cap of fat butchers leave on the top of the roast. Said fat melts and crisps during the cooking, basting the rich lean meat with fatty goodness. Picanha (NAMP number 1184D) can be difficult to find. Which was why I was amenable to trying a sample from Holy Grail, an artisanal company that sources upper Prime meats –meats that are typically available only to restaurants.

Brazilians have devised an ingenious way to cut and grill picanha. They slice it crosswise (with the grain) into 2-inch strips, which they curl into C-shapes and thread onto rotisserie spits. The seasonings are kept simple: salt and only salt prior to cooking; farofa (toasted cassava flour) and molho de companha (fiery country salsa) by way of optional accompaniments.

The skewers spin over a hot charcoal fire, the fat from the top skewer dripping onto the picanha below it. Once browned on the outside, the meat is paraded through the dining room on a spit to be carved directly onto patrons’ plates. The uncooked meat in the center is returned to the rotisserie for more grilling. The beauty of this system? Everyone gets an end cut.

When I cook picanha, I like to roast it on the rotisserie, but instead of slicing it into strips, I grill it whole. This is quicker and easier than the Brazilian method and it keeps the meat nice and juicy.

I also like to “hedgehog” the fat cap—score the surface in a deep crosshatch pattern. This helps render some of the fat and crisp what remains.

For seasoning (and for extra flavor), I use a brisket rub in the style of Texas Hill Country brisket: equal parts sea salt and coarsely ground black pepper, with garlic and onion powder for pungency and oregano and hot pepper flakes for oomph.

Meat prices are rising this holiday season—along with everything else. Want to serve an impressive, richly flavorful roast—without busting your budget? Picanha is your ticket.

Picanha Spice-Rubbed and Spit-Roasted on a Wood Fire Rotisserie

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BBQBible Exclusive – Picanha Roast – 20% Off Sitewide with code BARBECUEBIBLE at HolyGrailSteak.com through 12/20/21.

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The post Introducing Picanha (Fat Cap Sirloin Roast) appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

By: Daniel Hale
Title: Introducing Picanha (Fat Cap Sirloin Roast)
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2021/12/13/introducing-picanha-fat-cap-sirloin-roast/
Published Date: 12/13/21

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Oven Baked BBQ Pork Chops

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When's the last time you sank your teeth into a simple oven-baked BBQ pork chop? But, can a pork chop in the oven actually have good flavor and still be juicy and tender? Yes, and this quick weeknight recipe is the no-fuss rescue the sheet pan chops been begging for.

This post was sponsored by  Head Country Barbecue. Thoughts and opinions are my own.

Oven-baked pork chops bring back memories of shake-and-bake dinners with boil-in-a-bag veggies paired alongside (and trust me, as a kid, I loved that every veggie came with a cheese sauce). But, the meat was always dry and tough and as an adult, I went to the tenderloin for flavor on busy nights.

But, the standards exist for a reason. So, I wanted to see if giving this old-school dinner an update could succeed with the ease of those box kits but better with quick cook time, tender pork, and tons of flavor.

With a simple rub and a quick barbecue baste, this recipe checked all the boxes. These are not your mama's pork chops. They are so much better.

What you need to make this recipe

This is a basic ‘what I've got in the pantry' recipe. All you need is:

  • Bone-in pork chops – about an inch thick
  • Brown sugar
  • Salt
  • Paprika – add smoked paprika for a sublte touch of smoked flavor
  • Cumin
  • Ground black pepper
  • Hot and Spicy Head Country Bar-b-Que Sauce – The heat cuts the sweet from the brown sugar.

For the added Quick Spicy Pecans

  • Brown sugar
  • Salt 
  • Cayenne
  • jalapeno infused olive oil – you can swap regular olive oil for this
  • water

How to make oven baked bbq pork chops

This recipe comes together quickly. So grab everything you need to make sure you pull it off seamlessly and don't over cook the pork.

First preheat the oven and prep a baking sheet with foil.

Rub the pork with the brown sugar and spices and place on the baking sheet.

Bake the chops until they reach 130 F internally, just 15 minutes or so depending on the thickness of the chops.

Then, pull the chops from the oven and set it to broil.

Baste the chops in a thick layer of barbecue sauce and add the pecans before placing under the broiler.

Broil both sides, flipping once, until the BBQ sauce is tacky and the pork reaches 140.

Next, let the pork rest to reach 145F and make the quick spicy pecans.

Whisk the brown sugar, spices, oil and water in a small saucepan and allow to just begin to bubble before adding the pecans in to coat.

Lastly, turn the pecans out to cool before a rough chop.

Finally, serve the bbq pork chops with your favorite sides and garnish with the chopped pecans over top as garnish.

Recipe Tips and Tricks

Can I use boneless chops?

Yes, if you have boneless chops, you can absolutely use them. Boneless meat cooks quicker than bone in, so adjust your cook time accordingly.

Can I change the bbq sauce?

Swap the Hot and Spicy Bar-b-q sauce for their original or hickory smoke if you're worried about too much heat. Or, if you're feeling bold try their chipotle bbq sauce.

Can I make these ahead of time?

No, these pork chops are best served fresh. if you don't finish them all right after they are cooked, consider slicing them thin and using them in a toasted sandwich or omelet the next day. Every time you reheat the pork chop though, you'll be cooking it further and loosing the juices.

Serving suggestions

Pair these chops with creamy mashed potatoes, blanched green beans, or my favorite smoked brussels sprouts. The crunch from the pecans go well with each of these too.

More easy weeknight recipes

If you've tried this delicious recipe, or any other recipe on GirlCarnivore.com please don't forget to rate the recipe and let me know where you found it in the comments below. I get inspired by your feedback and comments! You can also FOLLOW ME on Instagram @girlcarnivore as well as on  Twitter and Facebook.

Oven-Baked BBQ Pork Chops

Juicy tender oven baked chops slathred in spicy bbq sauce and topped with quick spicy pecans for a bonus crunch. This recipe pays homage to my childhood memories of sheet pan pork chops with modern updates!

Course: Main Course

Cuisine: American

Prep Time5 mins

Cook Time20 mins

Resting Time5 mins

Servings: 4

Calories: 547kcal

For the Quick Spicy Pecans:

Prep the chops

  • Preheat the oven to 425F.

  • Pat the chops dry and line a baking sheet with foil.

  • Place the chops on the baking sheet.

  • Whisk the brown sugar, salt, paprika, cumin, and pepper together in a small bowl.

  • Pat the brown sugar-spice mixture all over the chops on both sides.

Bake the Pork Chops

  • Bake for 15 minutes until the pork reaches 135 degrees F.

  • Remove from oven, and set the oven to broil. Move the rack to the second highest slot.

Broil the Pork Chops

  • Baste the chops in Head Country hot and spicy sauce, coating both sides.

  • Add the pecans around the pork, and place under the broiler.

  • Cook for 2 minutes.

  • Remove from the oven, flip the pork chops.

  • Return to the oven and broil another 2 to 4 minutes, until sauce is tacky and pork chops temp at 140F.

  • Let rest, covered, for 5 minutes. The pork should rise to 145F while resting.

  • Place the pecans in a small bowl.

Make the Quick Spicy Pecans

  • Meanwhile, in a small saucepan whisk together the brown sugar, salt, and cayenne with the jalapeno-infused olive oil and water.

  • Set over medium heat until the sugar just begins to bubble.

  • Add the pecans that you toasted with the pork chops and stir to coat.

  • Allow the brown sugar to just bubble as you stir the pecans to coat.

  • Turn them out onto parchment paper in a single layer.

  • The pecans will quickly become tacky.

  • Once they are dry, give them a rough chop.

You can use boneless pork chops for this recipe as well, reduce the time to 10-12 minutes of baking for chops under 1” thick and adjust as needed for thicker chops.

Depending on where your oven racks sit in proximity to the broiler, adjust the time as needed to finish the cook on the meat and set the sauce.

This recipe calls for jalapeno-infused olive oil. Swap with regular olive oil if needed. 

If you're worried about the Hot and Spicy being too much for your family, try Head Country original sauce instead. Alternatively, for a bold smokey flavor, try their Chipotle sauce. 

Nutrition Facts

Oven-Baked BBQ Pork Chops

Amount Per Serving (1 g)

Calories 547
Calories from Fat 243

% Daily Value*

Fat 27g42%

Saturated Fat 9g56%

Trans Fat 1g

Polyunsaturated Fat 4g

Monounsaturated Fat 11g

Cholesterol 205mg68%

Sodium 748mg33%

Potassium 1045mg30%

Carbohydrates 9g3%

Fiber 1g4%

Sugar 9g10%

Protein 62g124%

Vitamin A 145IU3%

Vitamin C 1mg1%

Calcium 68mg7%

Iron 2mg11%

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

By: Kita
Title: Oven Baked BBQ Pork Chops
Sourced From: girlcarnivore.com/oven-baked-bbq-pork-chops/
Published Date: 12/13/21

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Dutch Oven Brisket Chili with my Secret Ingredient

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Dutch Oven Brisket Chili with my Secret Ingredient – OK, truth be told, I have two secret ingredients for my chili. Well, after this post, one of them will still be secret. The second one I’m sharing with the world. Why? Because we all need a leg up on the chili competition. Everyone thinks they make the best chili. Usually because we make it for crowds and everyone, after having a free bowl of chili, lauds us with how great the chili is. But we know, in our heart of hearts, that our chili is indeed the best chili and it’s because of the care we take in protecting the secret we slide in when no one is looking. And no, that secret ingredient is not love, or chocolate, or a cup of bourbon (even tho all of those things make fine additions to any pot of this reddish brown deliciousness). No, my secret ingredient is Worcestershire sauce. Before you wrinkle your nose at that because your secret ingredient is way better, just keep in mind I don’t use that thin, watery stuff that could just as easily be soy sauce or teriyaki to even the keenest of culinary eyes. No, I use the thick, gooey Worcestershire sauce simply known as W Sauce because spelling and pronouncing Worcestershire is pretty darn difficult, even more so after a couple adult beverages. In fact, after 2 said libations, everyone who tries to say Worcestershire sounds like someone who hasn’t been sober a single day in 30 years. Seriously, give it a try. 

Also, let’s talk about chili in general. It’s not rocket surgery. It’s meat, tomato sauce, beans and chili powder. Yes, chili has beans in it. It was invented in the northern regions of Mexico and it most definitely had beans. If you don’t like beans in chili, great, skip the beans. That doesn’t mean they don’t belong or that I am wrong for wanting beans in mine. It means you like it a different way which is perfectly OK, just don’t argue about it. Only an idiot would argue that the way he prefers to eat something is some how superior over someone else’s preference. Unless of course you like a well done steak. In that case you deserve the ridicule. JK. I don’t care. So this is a pretty basic recipe, but with a few tricks to make it better than most. Use the tricks and tips on your recipe if you like. And always make brisket chili if you can. It’s head and shoulders above ground beef.

Dutch Oven Brisket Chili Ingredients:

  • 1 large onion, rough chopped, with a few slices reserved
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 2.5 pounds of leftover brisket, cubed into big chunks
  • 30 ounces tomato sauce
  • 1 packet of premade chili mix
  • The reserved onion sliced razor thin
  • 6 oz W Sauce (American’s Worcestershire Sauce), divided
  • 15 oz dark red kidney beans. drained
  • 15 oz black beans, drained
  • 15 oz white  kidney/cannellini beans(sub navy beans), drained
  • 1 small can or tube of tomato paste to thicken (optional)

Let’s start off with portions here. Most of you go by whatever the back of that little packet of premade chili sauce. Which is 1 lb of ground beef. I like my chili meaty. Sorry. I like my chili MEATY! Like I can’t stress it enough how meaty I like my chili. I need that guy who narrates the Arby’s commercials or maybe James Earl Jones to say it in their rich baritone voices to give it justice. You can hear them in your head right now, can’t you?!?!

I also don’t like to go light on the beans, nor do I like to stick to one variety of beans. Get creative. Go with some different colors and kinds. There’s no wrong answer here. I go with dark red kidney beans, black beans and white beans. More beans means thicker chili, just make sure to drain them. We want the beans and not the sauce. 

Start by dropping the dutch oven into some nest of hot coals with the coals a few inches away from the outer edge of the cast iron pot. At first I put the pot right in the coals. I poured some oil in there, turned my back to chop the brisket and the oil burst into flames. I’ll show the coal arrangement and a little about fire management in a minute. For this cook, I used the Hooray Grill:

For the brisket, truth be told this is not my brisket. I went to a friend’s BBQ restaurant and ordered a chunk of brisket. 2.5 pounds to be exact and I chunked it up:

The brisket needs no seasoning. It was already seasoned when it was cooked. 

Once the dutch oven gets to around 350 go ahead and add the oil:

And then add the onion:

Tip #1:. Pour the meat on top of the onion. 

Tip 2: Add 4 ounces of the 6 ounces of W Sauce and close the lid:

Brisket Chili

Let the onion steam up through the beef and let the W Sauce infuse into the fibers of the brisket. I call it the White Castle or Krystal effect (depending on your region). It hyper infuses the onion and W Sauce flavor into the brisket. Do this if you go with hamburger or cubed pork loin, or sirloin or whatever.

Once the meat is warmed up and the onion is translucent, drop in the tomato sauce:

Brisket Chili

And here you can see the fire management. The hot coals are a few inches away from the pot:

Brisket Chili

Pay attention to that fire. Every so often, you will need to add a handful of coals here and there. When, and how much is totally a feel thing. I suggest some nitrile gloves because doing this with lump charcoal and tongs is not easy. 

Tip #3: Now that onion I reserved from the stuff I rough chopped I’m going to slice razor thin:

If you can’t see the knife blade through the onion, you are slicing it too thick:

Then finely mince that down to practically nothing. We want that onion to melt into the sauce. So add about 1/4 cup of finely, finely minced onion and the chili powder into the Dutch oven:

Brisket Chili

Now stir it in:

Brisket Chili

Let that cook for a couple hours and thicken up, concentrating those flavors.

Tip #4: Drain the beans:

We want the brisket and the beans to be the show here. If we dump in all the sauce from the beans then the sauce that is in and around the brisket and beans will be the star. That’s not my goal. I want to go subtle on seasoning because I’m using great ingredients. If I were using boring hamburger I would need the sauce to shine. But already cooked brisket is magical by itself. Let it shine. 

Brisket Chili

Since I was doing a photo shoot, I poured all my beans in at once. If I were making this for my family (rather than a camera), I would only pour in the kidney and black beans right now. The white beans are softer and can turn to mush if allowed to simmer to long. Which brings us to:

Tip #5: Reserve the white beans until about 30 minutes before serving. Allow the red and black beans to simmer in the sauce but add the white beans at the end. 

Finally, add the remaining 2 ounces of W Sauce and stir it through.

Now just let it simmer with the lid cocked off to the side to allow water vapor to escape, and let it thicken:

Brisket Chili

For me, I do not want my chili soupy. That’s bean soup with meat added. It should mound on a spoon like this:

Brisket ChiliBrisket Chili

If you need to serve your chili and it hasn’t cooked down enough, add some of that tomato paste in. It will help. 

I didn’t list any accoutrements for adding to the chili after it’s served. You know better what you and your crew like. I added some rings of baby bell peppers for some color and some crunch. A little sour cream, shredded cheese (not the stuff from the package but shredded myself), green onions, some oyster crackers and a little more W Sauce for everyone. And for me personally, a little hot sauce. 

Brisket Chili

And if you have a soup crock, that always helps in presentation:

Brisket Chili

So if you want to take your chili to the next level and keep that improvement to yourself, I give you the W Sauce:

Brisket ChiliBrisket Chili

OK, to sum up, here are my tips:

Tip #1:. Pour the meat on top of the onion and close the lid. Let the onion steam up through the brisket.

Tip #2: Add the secret ingredient – W Sauce. 

Tip #3: Slice some onion razor thin so it melts into the chili.

Tip #4: Drain the beans.

Tip #5: Reserve the white beans until about 30 minutes before serving.

You can do this recipe word for word, step by step and it will make great chili. But maybe you have a killer recipe already and you want to adapt a couple of these tips/tricks to your method. Either way works. I hope you learned at least one new trick/tip today.

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email. 

W Sauce did not pay me to make this post. I discovered their sauce and love it a ton. Help out a small business and check them out yourself. One bit of warning. There’s no going back to the thin, watery stuff. I have another post with their sauce. Check it out here. 

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Dutch Oven Brisket Chili with my Secret Ingredient
Author: Scott Thomas
Recipe type: Entree
Cuisine: Chili
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

 

Dutch Oven Brisket Chili cooked over open fire and infused with my secret ingredient.
Ingredients
  • 1 large onion, rough chopped, with a few slices reserved
  • ¼ cup vegetable oil
  • 2.5 pounds of leftover brisket, cubed into big chunks
  • 30 ounces tomato sauce
  • 1 packet of premade chili mix
  • The reserved onion sliced razor thin
  • 6 oz W Sauce (American's Worcestershire Sauce), divided
  • 15 oz dark red kidney beans. drained
  • 15 oz black beans, drained
  • 15 oz white kidney/cannellini beans(sub navy beans), drained
  • 1 small can or tube of tomato paste to thicken (optional)

Instructions
  1. Set the Dutch Oven near the coals and get the pot above 350 but no higher than 400
  2. Drizzle the oil in and then layer the bottom of the pan with the onion
  3. Then top with the brisket and 4 ounces of the W Sauce and close the lid and let the onions and W sauce steam the beef
  4. Once the onion is translucent and the brisket has warmed up, add the tomato sauce and stir it through
  5. Slice the reserved onion razor thin and then finely mince and add to the dutch oven along with the chili powder packet
  6. Set the lid on top a bit askew to allow the steam to escape
  7. Drain the liquid off the beans and add the red kidney and black beans and stir them through
  8. Add the the remaining W sauce and blend completely
  9. About 30 minutes before serving, add the white kidney beans and mix them in, closing the lid but leaving a gap for the steam to escape
  10. Once the chili has thickened, serve with whatever accoutrements you wish

And here are some more pics that didn’t make the recipe but are pretty enough for Pinterest!

 

 

The post Dutch Oven Brisket Chili with my Secret Ingredient first appeared on GrillinFools.

Author information

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Original Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to college with a suitcase and a grill where he overcooked, undercooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thousands of failures, and quite a few successes, nearly two decades later he started a website to show step by step, picture by picture, foolproof instructions on how to make great things out of doors so that others don’t have to repeat the mistakes he’s made on the grill.

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By: Scott Thomas
Title: Dutch Oven Brisket Chili with my Secret Ingredient
Sourced From: grillinfools.com/blog/2021/12/05/dutch-oven-brisket-chili-with-my-secret-ingredient/
Published Date: 12/05/21

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