Connect with us

Mango-Habanero Wings

Published

on

Well, it had to happen, but Wing Month 2021 is coming to a close. It feels fitting to end this most special time of year with a wing that is often a choice for me when eating out, but one I never attempted to make at home—mango-habanero wings. Being a fan of barbecue in general makes me a predisposed fan to the sweet-fruity-spicy combo, and these wings certainly have that to an extreme that I find pretty irresistible. Coming up with my own recipe let me fine tune everything I love about them to end up with some really ultimate specimens, in my opinion anyway.

Mango and habanero are common partners in crime for good reason—super sweet mangos get an extra boost of complimentary fruitiness from habaneros, which also deliver a contrasting heavy heat to the sugars. While I have not made a wing recipe until now with this duo, you can find the pairing throughout my extensive recipe work with other greats like mango-habanero shrimp or mango-habanero salsa.

When considering how this flavor combo would best work with wings, it required some initial thought on how a dry seasoning might best come into play. Most all of my wing recipes begin with a base of baking powder and salt—the former helps with giving grilled or baked wings a textured skin. By that's just a blank slate to build flavor upon, and I used a few additions here by way of white pepper for its unique sharpness, chipotle powder to add in some smokiness, and paprika mainly for a boost of color.

After placing my wings into a bowl and patting them dry with paper towels, I sprinkled in the rub and tossed the bowl at the same time to evenly coat all of the little pieces of chicken with the seasoning.

I then arranged the wings on a wire rack set in a sheet pan, leaving a little space between them, and then placed the entire thing in the fridge overnight. This air drying step is really crucial and well worth the effortless time if you want crackling skin on your wings without deep frying. I add the word “crispy” into most all of my wing recipes because most of the time grilled or baked wings are not associated with crunch, but as long as you don't skip this step, you should end up with that excellent crackling skin.

Now it was onto the big gun of this recipe, the sauce. No surprise that we start with a combo of mango and habanero. I tried hard to find Ataulfo mangoes, which are smaller, sweeter, and more tender than the larger, more standard mango varieties in the U.S., but could only find ones in an already rotting state, so settled on the ripest mangoes I could find from the plentiful common ones. I ended up using the flesh of almost two full mangoes and began the mix with three stemmed habaneros. I pureed those along with rice vinegar, brown sugar, and soy sauce and tasted. It was damn spicy, but I knew once cooked and then applied to wings, the sauce would lose some of its kick, so I added a couple more habaneros to deliver the more intense heat I was after with these wings.

Next it was time to move to the stove, where I started by heating garlic and ginger in oil until both were fragrant, but not yet browned. Then I added in the puree and brought it to boil, reduced the heat, and let it simmer.

The sauce was already pretty viscous, so it didn't take too long for it thicken up just a bit more to a consistancy to make it proper finishing glaze. As the sauce cooked, I tasted it and adjusted the seasonings as necessary to make it fully in balance and flavorful, which required a little more brown sugar and soy sauce from my starting point.

Now I try to make most of my recipes during the daylight hours for photographic purposes, but I was making these wings on a night we had a guest coming over who would be arriving just after sunset. I had to make a decision to either cook early to get better glamour shots, or cook later for the best eating for me and my guests and I chose the later. The air dried wings went on the grill over indirect heat just around sunset, and when they were done 45 minutes later, there was precious little light for photos and am surprised I could even get this one of their orange-hued and crispy skins.

I then moved indoors and worked with the non-ideal kitchen lights to grab a shot of me saucing the wings. I had made the sauce the day before and stored it in the fridge, so I took it out a couple hours before serving so the sauce wouldn't be too cold when it was applied to the hot chicken.

The wings were smelling really awesome at this point, and I didn't even try to improve my less than stellar lighting and plating and just snapped some photos real quick and dug in. The first flavor to hit in these wings was the strong sweet and fruity mango, which was so prominent that at first I couldn't imagine them being spicy. But then, as a fruitiness increased from the habaneros and light smoky undertone added an extra flavor dimension, the heat hit and hit hard. I got the lip numbing spiciness I was after, but it wasn't so intense that eating wing after wing wasn't pleasurable. It certainly helped that some pizza slices were consumed between rounds of wings, but that incredible sweet, fruity, and spicy progression had me coming back for more and more. I think my homemade sauce delivered some nice nuances that elevated them in my mind from what I usually get while eating out, with the fresh garlic and ginger being part of that, but the savoriness from soy sauce was really what delivered that extra something special. So it's sad to say this recipe puts a bookend on another wing month, but at least I know I'm leaving y'all with four great new recipes added to my already lengthy wing explorations to keep you going through the winter and beyond.
Published on Thu Jan 28, 2021 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe

Yield 4-6 servings

Prep 25 Minutes
Inactive 8 Hours
Cook 45 Minutes
Total 9 Hours 10 Minutes

Ingredients
For the Sauce
1 1/2 cups diced peeled ripe mango
3-6 habanero peppers, to taste
1/3 cup rice vinegar
1/4 cup light brown sugar
2 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon canola or vegetable oil
2 teaspoons finely chopped fresh ginger
2 teaspoon finely chopped fresh garlic (about 2 medium cloves)
Kosher salt, to taste
 
For the Wings
1 tablespoon baking powder
2 teaspoons kosher salt
1 teaspoon freshly ground white pepper
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon chipotle powder
3 pounds chicken wings, cut into drumettes and flats
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish
Procedure
To make the sauce: Place mango, 3 habanero peppers, vinegar, brown sugar, and soy sauce in the jar of a blender and puree until smooth. Taste sauce and add in more habanero peppers to taste to reach desired spiciness, pureeing after each pepper addition until sauce is smooth.
Place oil, ginger, and garlic in a medium saucepan set over medium heat and cook until garlic and ginger are faragarent, but not browned, 2 to 3 minutes. Pour in mango and habanero puree, stir to combine, and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low and let sauce simmer until slightly thickened, about 15 minutes. Remove sauce from heat and allow to cool. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use.
To make the wings: In a small bowl, mix together baking powder, salt, white pepper, paprika, and chipotle powder. Place wings in a large bowl, pat dry with paper towels, and sprinkle in seasoning mixture. Toss until wings are evenly coated in the seasoning. Arrange wings in a single layer on a wire rack set inside a baking sheet lined with aluminum foil, leaving a little space between each wing. Place baking sheet with wings in the refrigerator for 8 hours to overnight.
Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place the wings skin side up over the cool side of the grill, cover, and cook until skins are crisp and browned, about 45 minutes.
Transfer wings to a large bowl. Add in sauce and toss to thoroughly coat wings. Transfer wings to a platter, garnish with cilantro, and serve immediately.

You Might Also Like

barbecue,bbq,grilling,foodblogs,foodblog,nyc,new york city,meatwave,Grilling,Wings

By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Mango-Habanero Wings
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/grilled-crispy-mango-habanero-wings-recipe
Published Date: 01/28/21

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/outdoor-cooking/are-you-a-new-pellet-grill-owner-18-tips-for-best-performance/

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Grilling Tips

Nashville Hot Cauliflower

Published

on

Say wha?
 
Saw this idea a few weeks ago, don't remember where.  I started with a roasted cauliflower recipe I like to use; boil the whole head in heavily-salted water for no more than 5 minutes, drain for ten, coat surface with oil and black pepper, then roast at 450º for 25 minutes.  I didn't know if I should pre-coat with the oil, as I'd be dipping it after it was cooked, so I painted one-half of the head with oil and marked it with a toothpick.  After 15 minutes on the Egg I had this:
 

 
The left side does show a bit more darkening, but not really worth the trouble.
 
I had printed out a Nashville Hot Chicken recipe some months back, but haven't made it yet.  I looked it up, and the first two ingredients for the sauce were 1) half-lb of lard, and 2) two sticks of butter!    I thought that may be a bit overwhelming so I made something up:  melted 3 Tblspns of butter, added a clove of garlic, then whisked in a tsp of cayenne, 1/4 cup of Frank's Red-Hot, 2 tsp soy sauce, and 2 tsp of a cornstarch/water slurry.  Once thickened, I poured it in a bowl big enough for the cauliflower head.  
 
After 15 minutes on the Egg, I put the cauliflower in the bowl and rolled it around; was just the right amount to totally coat it.  Returned it to the Egg for ten more minutes to "set" the sauce:
 

 
Kinda purty, like a 7 pound meatball.  I sliced it into "steaks", not florets, and let the pieces fall where they may.  Served with Kimchee:
 

 
The kimchee added nothing as far as color contrast, and nothing to do with Tennessee barbeque, but Ron's recent thread had me hungry for kimchee so…  The meal could've used a big pile of white rice, however.
 
Thanks for looking.  

EggHead Forum

By: Botch
Title: Nashville Hot Cauliflower
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1228032/nashville-hot-cauliflower
Published Date: 06/06/21

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/grilling-tips/a-brief-caveman-pic-tutorial/

Continue Reading

Grilling Tips

A brief caveman pic tutorial

Published

on

For those on the reverse sear/caveman fence, this may or may not seal the deal; (all temps *F on the dome)
Low and Slow around 250*F to around 7-8 *F below your desired finish temp. (Expect this step to run around 45 minutes for 1 1/2" and reasonably up steaks-half inch excluded  )

Now time for the hot and fast:  Open the dome and shut the lower vent-let the fire produce a hot lava bed across the coals,

Time for some long tongs and nimble-flip at around 60-90 seconds and pull when your finish temp is there.

You will be justly rewarded.  Add to your arsenal.
Stay healthy and safe out there- (Same steak for the whole show!)

EggHead Forum

By: lousubcap
Title: A brief caveman pic tutorial
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1228033/a-brief-caveman-pic-tutorial
Published Date: 06/07/21

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/outdoor-cooking/grilled-flatbread-with-charred-shallots-and-figs/

Continue Reading

Grilled Flatbread with Charred Shallots and Figs

Published

on

Figs are something I have let fall to the wayside in recent years. There was a time when I eagerly awaited the short windows of time when I was able to walk into my local grocery and purchase tender and sweet figs, and over the years they've worked their way into dishes on this site and off. The shift to almost entirely home cooking during the pandemic reminded me of the virtues of figs and the additional fodder they provide for recipes that offer something different from my usual rotation. So I picked up a package back in the fall and used some pantry staples to put together these grilled flatbreads with charred shallots and figs, then I wrote it up and scheduled the post for seven months from that date to remind to eat more figs when their first season hits in early summer.

This recipe was really born out of finding something new to do with figs that I purchased on a whim, and a pizza making session the day before I made these flatbreads left me with a desire to keep rolling with grilling dough. I have made many variations of flatbread dough throughout the years, but they were all doughs specialized for a specific cuisine, so I was looking for a more all-purpose recipe here and decided to try one out I saw on Food52. The hallmark of this high hydration dough is the large amount of extra-virgin olive oil in it, which I hoped would make this a flavorful bread without the long fermentation time I normally use to achieve that goal.

The first rise for the dough to double in volume took just under and hour, and during that downtime, I put together a balsamic glaze to use as a finishing drizzle on the flatbreads. I had a very small bottle of balsamic vinegar in the cupboard, so I poured the entire contents into a saucepan and added a little brown sugar to it. I then let the mixture simmer over medium-low heat until it reduced by half and had a spoon-coating thickness. When done, I removed from the heat and set aside.

Once the initial rise was finished, I transferred the dough to a well floured cutting board (it was a very sticky dough), divided it into four, and then formed each of those pieces into a ball. I set the portioned dough on a parchment lined baking sheet, covered with a damp cloth, and let it start the second rise, which took about 30 minutes.

During this time, I got everything else together needed for the final flatbreads so I could assemble them very quickly while the bread was still hot and at its very best. After lighting the fire, I cut up my figs into somewhat thin slices and also halved and peeled six small shallots.

The grill was ready to go after twenty minutes of ignition time, and I began by grilled the shallots, which I did over direct heat, placing them cut side down and just letting them cook until well charred. At this point they were somewhat tender, but not fully, so to finish them off, I flipped them over and grilled them until second side was also charred, which took less time than the first since they were already more than partially cooked. Once done, I transferred the shallots to a cutting board, removed the root ends that were holding them together on the grill, and then cut them into thin slices.

The shallots cooked pretty quickly, which was a good thing because the fire was still blazing hot to grill the bread, and a hot fire makes for the best flatbreads. I've rolled out other flatbreads I've made before, but this dough was so soft and stretchy, I went with freeform hand stretching this time. I did as best I could to get the bread even throughout, but, like with pizza dough, it was hard not to have a little extra heft around the edges with the center being thinner.

Happy enough with my globular oval shape, I carefully put the dough over the fire and let it cook until it began to brown a bit. I then flipped it over and browned on the second side and by then the bread was mostly cooked through, so I just kept flipping and moving it as needed to get it across the finish line and add a little extra color too.

As soon as the bread was off the grill, I brushed it with olive oil and assembled the final dish. I started with a layer of arugula, which I ended up going heavier on with subsequent flatbreads for an increased peppery character. Next went on the slices of figs and strips of shallots followed by dollops of a soft goat cheese and a drizzle of balsamic glaze. After slicing it up, I dug in and ate it while still pretty hot.

My first taste was of the bread, which had a nice crunch and chew, although it was not as flavorful as dough I let ferment for many more hours at room temperature or days in the fridge. That lighter touch though meant the toppings were more prominent, and for me it was the sweet and fruity figs that served as the centerpiece. Although there wasn't one in every bite, their presence was lasting and was elevated by the tangy and sugary glaze and given savory contrasts by the cheese, arugula, and shallots. I consumed a couple slices of this first flatbread before moving on and cooking the rest—wanting each one to be as fresh as possible when served. All-in-all, this was a good reminder that I need to get figs back into the rotation more, and having written this post mainly as a nudge to myself, you may see at least one more recipe featuring this dual seasoned fruit on the site before the year is out.
Published on Thu Jun 3, 2021 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe

Yield 4 servings

Prep 15 Minutes
Inactive 1 Hour 30 Minutes
Cook 20 Minutes
Total 2 Hours 5 Minutes

Ingredients
For the Balsamic Glaze
1/3 cup balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons light brown sugar
 
For the Dough
3 cups bread flour (396 g)
1 teaspoon kosher salt (3.5 g)
1 teaspoon instant yeast (4 g)
1 1/4 cups warm water (292.5 g)
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil (43 g)
 
For the Flatbread
6 small shallots, peeled and halved lengthwise
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
8oz fresh figs, thinly sliced
2 handfuls arugula (about 2 oz)
5oz soft goat cheese
Procedure
To make the balsamic glaze: Whisk together vinegar and sugar in a small saucepan set over medium heat. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium-low, and let simmer until reduced by half and thickened, about 10 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
To make the dough: Whisk together flour, salt, and yeast in the bowl of a stand mixer. Add water and oil and knead with dough hook on low speed until dough comes together. Increase speed to medium and knead for 5 minutes. Remove bowl from mixer stand, cover with plastic wrap, and let dough rise at room temperature until roughly doubled in volume, about 1 hour. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured work surface and cut into 4 even pieces. Roll each piece into a ball, transfer to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper, and cover with a damp cloth. Let rise at room temperature for 30 minutes more.
Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange coals evenly across charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill, and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil grilling grate. Place shallots on grill, cut side down, and cook until well charred, about 5 minutes. Flip shallots over and continue to cook until well charred on second side, about 3 minutes more. Transfer shallots to a cutting board, remove root end, and cut into thin strips.
On a floured surface, stretch one piece of dough out into an oval roughly 1/8″ thick. Place dough on hot side of grill and cook until browned and lightly charred in spots. Flip bread and continue to cook until second side is browned and lightly charred in spots. Transfer bread to a cutting board and brush with olive oil. Place 1/4 of the arugula on top followed by slices of figs and shallots. Spoon on dollops of goat cheese and drizzle with balsamic glaze. Cut into slices and serve immediately. Repeat with remaining dough and toppings.
Dough recipe from Food52.

You Might Also Like

barbecue,bbq,grilling,foodblogs,foodblog,nyc,new york city,meatwave,Grilling,Bread,Vegetarian

By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Grilled Flatbread with Charred Shallots and Figs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/grilled-flatbread-with-charred-shallots-and-figs-recipe
Published Date: 06/03/21

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/outdoor-cooking/maple-plank-bacon-wrapped-meatloaf/

Continue Reading

Trending

%d bloggers like this: