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How to Cold Smoke Cheese

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I had all of these slices of sharp cheddar so I just laid them out on my pan/rack in neat little rows.

Feel free to be more “freestyle” with it if you so choose.

You could also lay the cheese directly on the grates of your smoker or grill but I thought this would make it easier.

There's a ton of these smoke tubes on Amazon and you can even find them in stores that sell smoke/grill supplies. I have “loaned out” all of my trays and tubes that are made by A-Maze-N smoker (the ones I usually use) so I was forced to use this cheapo tube smoker that I got on Amazon.

I filled it with pecan pellets and laid it on the left side of my RecTeq smoker, right next to the probe inlet so it could get plenty of air

I used my butane torch to light it until it was burning on it's own

Then it should be allowed to burn until it goes out, a couple of minutes usually.

This creates a “cherry” of coals that create smoke as the pellets smolder and it slowly works it's way from front to back creating smoke for several hours.

Once it's going good and the smoke is producing steadily, the cheese is ready to go on the grates.

Lay the rack of cheese directly on the grates of the smoker or grill you are using.

Note: The smoker or grill is not turned on or lit.. it's just an enclosed space to house the cheese and the smoke.

Man, look at all that smoke!

If you don't have a smoker or grill, you could also use a makeshift box with a hole cut out on the side for air. The tube would need to be elevated a little so it can get air all around it and far enough away from the sides of the box so it could not cause a fire. It's not ideal but it could be done.

I chose to use the RecTeq pellet smoker as my host.

Once the cheese has been smoking for a couple of hours, feel free to add a little original rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub) to the top of the cheese. I had not tried this before so I added rub to half of the cheese. (as it turns out, I should have put rub on every one of them 'cause it was good!)

After the cheese has smoked for 3-4 hours, it will have a brownish tint to it and this is visual clues that the smoke has done it's thing.

Bring the rack of cold smoked cheese into the house and set it on the counter to cool.

How Long To Cold Smoke Cheese?

Some folks smoke for longer times, others shorter times and this depends on a number of things

How much smoke flavor you like
How strong of a smoke wood you use (alder vs. hickory, etc.)
How much smoke is being produced
I usually just use one of the pieces as a taster and take bites of it until it gets to the level I like.

The smoke tube was getting to the end of it's pellets by the 4th hour and fortunately the smoke was tasting perfect about then as well.

After the cold smoked cheese has cooled for a little bit, place it into zip top bags and place it in the fridge for 2 weeks to “age” and sort of mellow out.

During this time the smoke moves from the surface of the cheese and absorbs more into the cheese. This makes it more mellow and it will definitely taste better after this waiting period.

Be sure to write the finish date on the bag so you'll know when it's ready to eat.

What if the cheese sweats? This sometimes happens and is often due to the cheese getting a little too warm or if you place the cheese into the smoker when it's really cold. I don't worry about it too much. I am much more concerned that it doesn't melt.

Can I smoke soft cheeses? You can but it's important that the smoker stay really cool. For this we often use ice or just do it on a day when it's really cool outside.

Help, the cheese tastes like an ashtray! This is what I've heard many times. Place the cold smoked cheese into a zip top bag as mentioned in the method above and let it spend at least a couple of weeks in the fridge just mellowing out. This will often do the trick.

This may also mean that you prefer cheese that is less smoky. Make a note of this and next time, cut your smoke time in half and use a milder wood such as apple or alder.

Cold Smoking,Newsletter Archive,2021,Cheese

By: Jeff Phillips
Title: How to Cold Smoke Cheese
Sourced From: www.smoking-meat.com/april-15-2021-how-to-cold-smoke-cheese
Published Date: 04/14/21

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For the Best July Yet, 8 Great Recipes for the Grill

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There’s no better month than July in North America to grill or smoke. With Independence Day entertaining now in the rear-view mirror, you can now focus on what you want to grill, whether it be a Beer Can Breakfast Burger for your fishing or camping buddies, fiery Nashville Hot Wings for a tailgate party, or Grilled Key Lime Mojitos and Jamaican Jerk Chicken for an authentic Caribbean blow-out. Make this a month to remember.

Beer-Can Breakfast Burgers
Savory pork, bacon, eggs, and cheese on an English muffin—this high-energy breakfast will fuel summer adventures for hours. They’ll be a hit in your back yard or at your campsite.

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Double-Grilled Summer Vegetable Frittata
Perfect for a weekend brunch or a weeknight dinner, this frittata features an array of grilled fresh vegetables that can change depending on what’s in season. Add meat, if desired—ham, cooked bacon, or chorizo or other sausage.

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Nashville Hot Wings
Incendiary Nashville Hot Chicken “takes wing” in this live fire interpretation. The wings get a double blast of heat from hot red pepper flakes and a cayenne-inflected baste. Said to be invented by a woman eager to take revenge on her tomcatting partner, her plan to turn his favorite fried chicken into a fiery weapon failed when he unexpectedly loved the very spicy chicken.

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Grilled Key Lime Mojitos
One theory about the origins of mojitos is that indigenous South American peoples made a medicinal concoction from limes, mint, and fermented sugar cane. Although a Havana bar disputes that. In any case, Steven’s version of a mojito, made with charred sugared limes, mint, rum, and club soda, will cure whatever ails you. Ernest Hemingway would approve.

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Cherry-Smoked Strip Steak with Cutting Board Sauce
If mastering the reverse-sear method of cooking thicker slabs of meat is on your bucket list this month, start with this recipe. (If you’re unacquainted with the technique, it involves a low and slow smoke with wood chips or chunks followed by a quick sear.) New York chef Adam Perry Lang gets the credit for developing this easy complementary board sauce using chiles, herbs, and meat juices.

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Jamaican Jerk Chicken
Were you aware that spicy foods actually help a body handle heat by causing it to perspire? Just look at the repertoire of hot foods in the world; they’re mostly from the steamier latitudes. Take Jamaican Jerk Chicken, for example. Steven’s version is super-authentic. Cooked over pimento wood (or alternatives), it’s a reason to party. Find pimento wood here.

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Grilled Swordfish Steaks with Golden Raisin Chimichurri
Line-caught swordfish is a summer staple in the Raichlen household. Though often served with grill-blistered cherry tomatoes and a green salad, Steven likes to mix things up by serving this meaty fish with a jewel-like chimichurri and golden raisins. Dinner party worthy? Hell, yes.

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Smoky Bourbon Peach Cobbler
This recipe, which came from our friend Russ Faulk, chief designer at Kalamazoo Gourmet, combines two Southern barbecue staples—fresh Georgia peaches and pecan wood. Ooops. Did we mention bourbon? Cooked in a cast iron skillet, it is a sublime example of cobbler and will wow summer guests. We’ve even been guilty of adding slivers of bacon to the filling. For more of Russ’s recipes, check out his book Food + Fire.

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The post For the Best July Yet, 8 Great Recipes for the Grill appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Homepage Feature,Recipes,July Recipes,summer

By: Daniel
Title: For the Best July Yet, 8 Great Recipes for the Grill
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2021/07/06/8-recipes-for-the-grill-in-july/
Published Date: 07/06/21

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Pork Belly Burnt Ends

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Okay, these turned out so insanely flavorful and rich. Found a 9lb. slab of pork belly at Wegmans in the Brooklyn Navy Yard and knew I had to try the recipe for burnt ends I saw on howtobbqright.com. I sliced the belly into 1.5" cubes and covered them in Dizzy Dust. Using a wire rack from a sheet pan we have in our kitchen, I smoked the cubes indirect 225°-250°F for about two and a half hours. I then transferred them to an aluminum pan and added brown sugar, butter and drizzled some honey. After two more hours at 250°F, I glazed them with a mixture of BBQ sauce, buffalo sauce, apple juice, apple sauce, peach preserves & Crystal hot sauce that I simmered on the stove until smooth. Once glazed, I threw the aluminum pan back on the egg for 10 more minutes to caramelize them.

Pork

By: joshpounds90
Title: Pork Belly Burnt Ends
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1228250/pork-belly-burnt-ends
Published Date: 07/07/21

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Smoke Brisket and Pork Butt Cook on the Deep South Smokers GC36

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[FTC Standard Disclosure] We received the BBQ UltraQ free of charge last year to review. I also use Amazon Affiliate links for products that I use and I receive a small commission for those. We received no other compensation for this post. 
We smoked a pair of briskets and pork butts on the gravity-fed Deep South Smokers during the 4th of July weekend.
Sliced brisket platter with meat from the point and flat. Loved our fire-roasted jalapeno potato salad. Served with Bush's Mixed Chili beans, Texas toast, and the Texas BBQ sauce from Ray Sheehan's Award-Winning BBQ Sauces and How to Use Them.
I have to be honest and admit that this is the least-good brisket I've made in two years. When I say least-good, it was still edible and better than most I've had at restaurants; it just wouldn't place in the top half at a BBQ competition. It was a little tight (not tough), not as juicy, and a bit underwhelming in flavor.
So why am I posting about it? Because sometimes, there is more to learn in failures than successes. The lesson I reiterated or confirmed this past weekend is this:  When making changes to your brisket (or pork, chicken, ribs) program, change only one thing at a time. I changed way too many variables to get meaningful data.

Changed the brand of beef due to availability issues.I used choice instead of prime beef due to availability issues.Changed 1 of my 2 brisket rubs.I did not inject the brisket at all.I did not give the brisket a 12-hour dry brine.Cooked the brisket whole instead of separated into the flat and point.The pork? Oh, it was fantastic, up to my usual standards – juicy, tender but not mushy, and flavorful.
The PrepPork ButtsTwo 9-lb pork butts from SwiftInjected with 2 cups quality apple juice and 2 tablespoons kosher saltWiped dry and then applied a thin coat of peanut oilSeasoned heavily with Cimarron Docs. Usually, I save that rub for ribs, but it is getting dated, so I need to use it up.Covered and placed in the fridge until going on the smoker 5 hours later.BrisketsTwo 15-lb Chairman Reserve briskets Trimmed whole, wiped dry, and lightly coated with peanut oil.Seasoned with a layer of my NMT Beef Rib v.2 and a heavier layer of Dead End BBQ brisket rub.Covered and placed in the fridge until going on the smoker 4 hours later.Note, this was USDA choice. "Premium" is NOT a grade, nor is it a pseudonym for USDA prime. I hear that misconception a good bit.
Both briskets ready to be covered and placed on refrigeration. I like to keep my smoking meats cold until the last possible minute because meat takes smoke better at temps below 120-140°f, and I want them to stay in that smoke zone as long as possible during the cook.
Briskets and butts ready to go on the smoker in the wee hours.

The Smoker SetupI used the Deep South Smokers GC36, which is a gravity-fed smoker. I love this cooker for its size, even cooking temperatures, and moist cooking environment. It is called gravity-fed because the charcoal is in a narrow stack in a chute on the right, and it is self-fueling as the coal burns at the bottom of the chute. 
I prefer to set up my cookers by the light of day. That way, when it is time to light up in the middle of the night, it's just a quick task. You can see the charcoal hatch door is open on the upper right side.
Looking down at the top of the charcoal chute. For this cook, I was using Frontier lump charcoal. I handpick the pieces of lump charcoal because 1) small bits block airflow and 2) too long pieces can "bridge" in the chute, keeping the rest of the coal from dropping down.
I used pecan chunks for my smoke wood. I took pecan split logs and cut them into thirds using an old miter saw as my chop saw.
This was my first time using the Pit Viper on this big smoker, and it held up to the challenge. It got the grill up to temp quickly and recovered temperatures. 
The BBQ Guru Ultra Q is the brains behind the Pit Viper. This continually compares the cooking temperature to the temperature that I set. If the cooking temp is less than the set temp, it blows the fan more to stoke the fire.
All ready to light it up.
I often get questions about this gravity-fed smoker and how it works, so I videoed a "nickel tour" of the Deep South Smokers GC36.

The CookSince this isn't a recipe post, I think the easiest way to lay out the cook is to show it in timeline form.12 am – Lit the pit using a propane gas torch through the fire pit door. Had the UltraQ set for 250°f. I went inside and used the app on my phone to watch the temps steadily rise up.2 am – Placed the butts and briskets in the smoker on the 1st and 3rd racks. I spritzed them all with plain apple juice to get them damp since the smoke has an affinity for moisture2 am – 9am – Spritzed meats with apple juice and replenished the smoke wood.9 am – I wrap based on color, typically when the meat is an internal temperature of 160-170° and about 6 hours into the cook. This depends on the type of cooker, meat, rub, and all kinds of variables.Pork butts were an internal temperature of 165°f AND had the color that I wanted, so I wrapped them. I used more rub, Parkay, and Stubbs Mopping Sauce in the wrap.Briskets were 170 and 165°f but not as dark as I would like. I decided to go ahead and wrap the briskets because I was concerned about moisture since they were not Prime beef and not injected. I used beef stock and dried minced onion in the warp.2pm The butts had reached an internal temperature of 203-5°f and were tender, so we pulled them to rest. I poured a pot of boiling water in the lowest steam pan to preheat a Cambro UPC300 hotbox. I put the wrapped butts into the Cambro to rest.The briskets were still tight, so I used the UltraQ to raise the cooking temperature to 275°f. I normally cook my briskets at 290°f, so this was well within my limits.4pmFinished the pork buttsI put a fresh chunk of wood in the firebox to get smoke going again. That's one thing I love about the gravity-fed smoker; it is easy to dose the smoke as you need it.I took the butts out of their foil wrap and put each of them, still on their rack, into a half-sized steam pan. I glazed the butts with Blues Hog BBQ sauce cut with apple juice to make it thinner.I put the butts in the smoker for 15 minutes to set the sauce and get one last kiss of smoke. Donnie Bray (2014 KCBS Team of the Year Pitmaster) told me that the last thing you put on your BBQ is the first thing you taste. Pork is done at this point.Briskets still not ready.5pmPulled one brisket and rested it in a preheated Cambro. The other brisket still wasn't ready. The internal temperature was still in the low 190s, and the flat was still tight in several places.6pmPulled the second brisket to rest.7pmRemoved the briskets from the Cambro. Drained the jus from the foil wrap into a fat & grease separator to get just the beef stock. Placed the briskets back into the smoker to reset the crust (the foil makes it mushy), which takes about 15 minutes.Sliced the brisket and placed it into half-sized steam pans, and then poured the warm, strained beef jus over the brisket.
Just before adding 46 pounds of cold meat, I bumped up the cooking temperature to not have to recover as much once I loaded it.
The slide-out racks make it easy to check the brisket and butts, as well as spritzing.
Wrapping the pork butts. I can smoke without foil, but it sure makes it more forgiving. The wrap preserves color, retains moisture, and lets you add another layer of flavors.
I have to run the meat probe wires through the door because the right angles of the probes make it impossible to pass the probe leads through the 1" pass-throughs.

Looked down at the charcoal chute, you can see how much the coal has cooked down over the previous 9 hours.
Brisket coming out of the wrap.
While the brisket is wrapped with foil, the bark gets soft. Putting the naked brisket back on helps reset that crust in about 15 minutes. Butcher paper is a compromise for the foil that won't make the crust as soft and lets more smoke in.
Pork butt after finishing cooking.

One of the briskets after finishing cooking.

The ResultsThe pork turned out as good as always – tender, juicy, smoky, and flavorful.

I knew these butts were going to be good when I went to take them out of the smoker because they had that tell-tale wiggle.

To process our pork butts, we wear cotton gloves under food gloves to provide heat protection but leave finger dexterity intact. I have bear claws, meat racks, and even a drill attachment, but we find hands work the best. We dress it with just a few splashes of my Olde Virden's Carolina-Style Vinegar Sauce to add flavor. We let our guests choose their BBQ sauce if any. 

The briskets were fine. They just weren't my usual "Oh my gosh, these are so good!" 

Sliced and ready to go into steam pans with warm beef jus. Brisket starts drying out fast so I like to get them into the drink ASAP. 

We cooked these on Saturday but to reheat them for Independence Day, I put these slices in beef jus in a skillet over med-low heat.
SummaryDespite my whining about the brisket (haha), this was a fantastic meal. A few slices of lean flat and a nice "chonk" of the luscious point. But the point stands, when making changes to your BBQ processes, change just one or two variables at a time. 
Sliced smoked brisket with my fire-roasted jalapeno/garlic mashed potatoes, mixed chili beans, pickles, and Texas toast. 
The BBQ sauce is on the side, where it should be for brisket. We like using the Texas BBQ Sauce recipe from Ray Sheehan's Award-Winning BBQ Sauces and How to Use them.

By: Chris
Title: Smoke Brisket and Pork Butt Cook on the Deep South Smokers GC36
Sourced From: www.nibblemethis.com/2021/07/smoke-brisket-and-pork-butt-cook-on.html
Published Date: 07/05/21

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