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Add This Technique to Your Repertoire: Smoke-Braising

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The ancient Greeks and Romans named late July and early August “the dog days of summer.” Many people associate the phrase with insufferably hot weather and panting, shade-seeking canines, when in fact, it references the annual rising in the nighttime sky of the dog star, Sirius.

In any case, this is the time of year when all but the most intrepid cooks avoid “heating up the kitchen.”

But do you have to give up flavorful, long-simmered comfort foods like short ribs, coq au vin (chicken cooked in wine), pot roast, or stews until the cooler days of fall? Not at all. In fact, your grill or smoker (gas, charcoal, or pellet) is capable of producing the best iterations of these dishes you’ve ever eaten.

 

What is Braising?
All of the above rely on a combination cooking method called braising (from the French brasier). Meat—especially tougher cuts with abundant fat and connective tissue—and sometimes dense vegetables are seared over high dry heat, then cooked low and slow with liquid (often broth fortified with aromatics) in a covered heat-proof container. The results are meltingly tender with rich, deeply infused flavors.

Braising outdoors not only keeps your summer kitchen cool, it gives you the option of seasoning your dish with fragrant wood smoke. (Try that in an oven or slow cooker.) Whether you cook over wood or a wood-enhanced fire using hardwood chunks or chips, your hands-on time will be minimal, especially if you use a gas or pellet grill; a charcoal grill will require periodic refueling, of course.

We like the technique so much, we call it “smoke-braising.”

 

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What is Smoke-Braising?
Chances are good you may have already tried smoke-braising without being aware of it. The “Texas crutch”—enclosing smoked meat tightly in foil or a covered container to finish cooking—is one example. It is often used to barbecue ribs (see 3-2-1 Ribs) or take brisket from its exasperating mid-cook “stall” to the finish line. Or maybe you’ve transferred pork shoulder to an aluminum foil-covered drip pan to let it simmer until finished in its own juices.

 

How to Smoke-Braise on Your Grill
To begin, you have two options: You can sear the meat (or vegetables) over a hot fire, or you can expose the food to wood smoke, the length of time depending on the food.

Next, reduce the heat on your grill or smoker to medium-low, 225 to 300 degrees. Enclose the food in aluminum foil and add a small amount of liquid (about 1/2 cup for a rack of spare ribs, for example) before tightly crimping the edges. Alternatively, place the food in a Dutch oven or disposable aluminum foil pan, add liquid and aromatics, and cover with the lid or foil. Replenish the liquid as needed. (Be very careful when opening the foil pouch or covered container as the escaping steam will be extremely hot.) Continue to cook until the food is done to your liking.

If desired, you can lift the now-cooked food out of the liquid, paint it with a sauce or glaze, and sizzle it directly over the fire. Or the flavorful braising liquid can be turned into an accompanying gravy or sauce. Your choice.

Below are links to a few of our favorite smoke-braised dishes, including one for Whiskey-Brined Pork Shoulder from my newly-released book, Healthy Wood Pellet Grill and Smoker Cookbook. But feel free to come up with your own. 

 

Best Cuts of Meat for Smoke-Braising
In the meantime, here are some good candidates for this cooking technique:

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Pork shoulder, loin roast, belly, shanks/hocks, or ribs (spare ribs, baby backs, or country-style ribs)
Beef short ribs
Lamb shanks, shoulder, or ribs
Beef chuck or top round roast
Chicken thighs, legs, or bone-in breasts
Turkey thighs or legs
Globe artichokes
Root vegetables
Beef or veal brisket
Oxtails
Beef tongue or cheeks

 

Asian-style beef oxtails braised with mushrooms, ginger, scallions, garlic, and beef broth.

 

Smoke-Braising Recipes:
1. Whiskey-Brined Pork Shoulder

Get the Recipe »

 

2. Smoke-Braised Lamb Shanks

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Get the Recipe »

 

3. Chorizo-Spiced Smoked Beef Tacos

Get the Recipe »

 

4. Project Smoke Brisket

Get the Recipe »

 

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Have you tried the smoke-braising technique? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post Add This Technique to Your Repertoire: Smoke-Braising appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Grilling Techniques,Homepage Feature,Recipes & Techniques,Techniques,smoke-braising

By: Cialina TH
Title: Add This Technique to Your Repertoire: Smoke-Braising
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/07/24/smoke-braising-technique/
Published Date: 07/24/20

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Cooking Tips

Strip Steak Tacos Recipe – How to Cook New York Strip Steak Tacos

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Strip Steak Tacos Recipe – How to Cook New York Strip Steak Tacos

Strip steak makes an excellent meat for fajitas. These fajitas are easy to prepare and require little clean-up. The steak is already seasoned, so you don’t need to marinate it before cooking. You can even freeze it for 30 minutes before you start cooking it.

If you plan on frying or baking the steak in tortillas, you should first marinate the steak before you begin cooking it. The marinating process will make it tender. Also, top sirloin steak is more tender than bottom sirloin. You can also purchase beef tenderloin, but it is more expensive than the other cuts.

First, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and peppers. Cook until they are soft but not browned. Once they are soft, add the steak and stir-fry until it is no longer raw. Remember that the steak doesn’t need to be cooked all the way; it will finish cooking when you add the vegetables.

Strip steak is a great option for fajitas because it has a great flavor and is easy to cook. Whether you want to use it in a taco or as part of a fajita, strip steak is easy to prepare. You can grill it to your liking and then serve it with grilled vegetables. You can even add your favorite toppings to it.

Once the steak has been marinated, you can cook it on a hot grill or cast iron skillet. For medium-rare steak, you should cook it for about four minutes per side. If you don’t have a large enough skillet, you can cut the meat into thin strips.

In addition to flank steak, you can also use skirt steak for fajitas. Skirt steak is tougher than flank steak and requires more time to cook. It is also tougher to chew, but the flavor is more intense than that of flank steak. It can be served with grilled vegetables, salsa, and cilantro.

Strip steak is a higher-end cut of beef. It is made from the short loin subprimal and comes with the backbone, but the backbone is usually removed. The more marbling, the higher the quality. As a result, strip steaks are one of the most expensive cuts of beef.

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How to Prepare Crusted Steak With Lemon Butter Steak Sauce

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How to Prepare Crusted Steak With Lemon Butter Steak Sauce

Crusted steak is a popular dish at steakhouses, which is easy to make at home. You can grill or bake it, depending on your preference. First, you need to bring the steak to room temperature. Then, mix the crumbs with herbs and sprinkle them over the meat. Cook the steak until it is cooked to your liking.

When cooking steak, use a thermometer to check the temperature. The internal temperature should be at least 150°F. You can also add sea salt, if you want to. Continue to cook the steak until it reaches a perfect medium rare or well-done level. When you’re finished cooking your steak, you can move it to the cool side of the grill away from the coals. It’ll finish cooking slowly over gentle heat, ensuring that it is just right.

After heating the steak, prepare the butter. You’ll need it for the final crust, which helps with the magic char. If you don’t like butter, you can use beef tallow or butter alternatives. You can also brush the steak with melted butter on one side, then the other side. Remember to turn the steaks every few minutes to achieve the final crust. If you’re not careful, you may end up with a burnt steak.

Peppercorns are also an essential ingredient for the crust of the steak, as they add additional flavor and texture. Crushed peppercorns can be crushed using a rolling pin, mallet, or spice grinder. You can also include tomato or balsamic vinegar to the mixture. If you have a conventional grill, you can use this method to cook steak on it.

If you’re looking for an easy way to prepare a steak with a crispy crust, you’ll want to try a Parmesan Crusted Steak. The combination of spices, herbs, and cheese in this recipe transforms the steak dining experience. Serve it with grilled vegetables and a glass of red wine to make the most out of it.

Another easy method for preparing a crusted steak is by using blue cheese. It adds a bit of texture to the steak and also helps bind the ingredients together. It also pairs well with balsamic-glazed caramelized shallots, which add a nice balance of flavors.

To prepare the steak crust, you first need to make sure you have a skillet large enough to accommodate the steak. After that, you can place the steak in the oven for a few minutes to get the bottom part of the steak hot. Once it reaches the desired temperature, it should rest for about five minutes before serving.

When preparing a steak crust, you should always consider the cut of beef you’re using. It’s important to choose a cut with the right fat and lean meat. You may also want to make the steak as thin as possible to reduce the risk of it being overcooked.

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Hawaiian Steak Recipe and Houston’s Hawaiian Ribeye Recipe

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Hawaiian Steak Recipe and Houston’s Hawaiian Ribeye Recipe

Hawaiian steaks are made with tender slices of beef, juicy pineapple, and sweet mini peppers. These ingredients are marinated and grilled until tender. Hawaiian steaks can be served with potatoes, fresh vegetables, and a simple salad. If you’re looking for a fast and easy dinner idea, Hawaiian steak kabobs are a great option.

To make Hawaiian steaks, you’ll need Hawaiian seasoning salt. This seasoning mix contains ‘alaea salt, garlic, onion, and ginger powder. It’s best if you apply the seasoning mix to the steaks at least 20 minutes before grilling. You can use Hawaiian seasoning salt for steaks, chicken, fish, and vegetables. Just remember to apply it liberally.

Hawaiian steaks can be cooked using a grill or on a barbecue grill. This method results in a juicy center and charred edges. The meat is best grilled in Hawai’i. Once you’ve cooked the beef, it can be stored in an airtight container for three to four days.

To prepare Hawaiian steaks, start by marinating the steak. You can use soy sauce, pineapple juice, apple cider vinegar, and garlic. Then, pour the marinade over the steaks and let them marinate for at least a day. You can also make the compound butter ahead of time and use it to cook the steaks.

Before grilling the steak, you should season it well on both sides. Heat a cast-iron pan on medium-high. Cook the steak for about two minutes on each side. Once finished, remove the steak from the grill and refrigerate it. Once the steak is cool, remove the excess fat.

To grill Hawaiian steaks, heat up a grill to medium-high or high. Grill the steaks until desired degrees of doneness are reached. The internal temperature of the steak should be 130F for rare steaks and 140F for medium-rare steaks. After the steaks are ready, you should transfer them to a cutting board and cover them with aluminum foil. Let them rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

The meat used in Hawaiian steaks is usually made from Spam, which is widely mocked on the mainland. It’s also served with pineapple. Spam is eaten in about a third of U.S. households and was the winner of a state fair recipe contest. One Hawaiian state fair recipe even turned Spam into a nacho burger.

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/cooking-tips/pork-chop-with-mushroom-sauce-for-pork/

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