Connect with us

Grilling Recipes

What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know

Published

on

You can walk the walk, but can you talk the talk? Here is a mini-glossary of terms every self-respecting griller and pit master should know.


12 Key BBQ Terms You Should Know

Bark

The dark, flavorful crust that forms on the exterior of meat such as brisket, ribs, or pork shoulder that is comprised of seasonings (salt and other spices and/or herbs), smoke particulates, and the caramelization of the meats natural sugars. Wrapping in foil or butcher paper will soften the bark.

Burnt Ends

This term traditionally refers to the well-done, tougher, fattier, and/or oddly shaped bits of beef that were carved off for aesthetic reasons when brisket was sliced for service at Kansas City barbecue joints like Arthur Bryants. Once given to patient customers for free, burnt ends are now created on purpose. But they are no longer limited to beef brisket: we have seen recipes for pork butt, pork belly, and even hot dog burnt ends.

Deckle/Point

Brisket, the deep pectoral muscle of a steer (there are two per animal), can be divided into two discrete sections: the top one is the decklealso called the pointwhich attaches the muscle to the rib cage. It is both fattier and tougher than the flat (see below).

Flat

Many supermarkets remove the leaner, flatter cut of a steers pectoral muscle from the deckle (see above). It resembles a thick flank steak and has a pronounced grain. When sold together, the deckle and the flat comprise a whole brisket, often called a packer brisket.

Money Muscle

Well known to competition barbecuers, the so-called money muscle is a discrete cylindrical muscle that is part of a butchered pork shoulder. Located opposite the bone, it resembles a pork loin and is leaner than the rest of the shoulder. Because it cooks faster, this desirable cut is often removed from the shoulder (which is returned to the smoker) and sliced separately for the turn-in box.

Pink Curing Salt

Not to be confused with mined Himalayan salt (halite), which ranges in color from pink to apricot, pink curing salt has long been used as a preservative. Known by several namesPrague powder is one of thempink curing salt is comprised of table salt and sodium nitrite (for relatively short curing times) or sodium nitrate (for hams and other meats that require long curing times). Both forms also contain a small amount of food dye to tint them cotton candy-pink and distinguish them from other salts in your kitchen. (For information on how to use them, click here.)

Reverse-Sear

Most of us were taught that the best way to cook thicker cuts of meat (over 1 inch) was to sear them over direct heat and then finish them slowly using indirect heat. The result was meat that exhibited concentric circles of doneness from the outside in. Reverse-searing calls for heating the meat slowly using indirect heat to a temperature 10 to 15 degrees below your goal temperature, then searing it over high heat to brown and caramelize the outside. (For more information, click here.) We recommend it for thick steaks, chops, and prime rib.

Smoke Ring

Smoked meat (brisket, ribs, pork shoulder, chicken, etc.) often exhibits a pinkish-red ring just below the exterior surface. This is called a smoke ring, and is a desirable result of the meats natural myoglobin reacting with the compounds in smoke. Because smoke rings can be produced with curing salt (see pink curing salt above), they are no longer used to judge meat in barbecue competitions.

Shiner

This is a derogatory term used to describe ribs that have been inexpertly butchered, meaning the meat has been trimmed so close that the underlying bone is visible. It happens often with beef ribs that have been separated from the rib roast as its in the butchers financial interest to carve as much higher-priced meat off the bones. For beef ribs worth eating, buy a prime rib roast and remove the bones yourself.

Spatchcock

Spatchcocking is a technique that can be used on poultry (chickens, turkey, game hens, etc.) to maximize the surface area exposed to heat from the grill and to shorten cooking times. Using a sharp knife or kitchen shears, remove the backbone from the bird. Discard, or save to make stock. If desired, remove the breast cartilage.Turn the bird over and gently flatten with the palm of your hand.

Stall

The stall has panicked many barbecuers smoking their first briskets or pork shoulders. It refers to a temperature plateau that usually occurs when the meat reaches an internal temperature of 150 to 165 degrees, and can last for an interminably long time. Hours. Novicesmaybe expecting the in-laws for dinner at a pre-ordained timeoften make the mistake of increasing the heat, a maneuver that can toughen the meat (especially brisket). For some, the stall signals the moment when the meat should be wrapped in foil or butcher paper. See the Texas crutch below.

Texas Crutch

Sometimes used derisively, this term refers to wrapping slow-cooked meats in foil or butcher paper once they hit the stall, locking in moisture and effectively steaming the meat until it reaches the desired temperature, usually 203 degrees. Barbecue greats like Austins Aaron Franklin have given the method respectability. (Read about Aaron in Stevens book, The Brisket Chronicles.) Sometimes, the meat is unwrapped and finished naked to restore the bark, which softens in the moist environment.

Did we miss any basic barbecue terms? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Barbecue University,Homepage Feature,News & Information,grilling tips

By: Cialina TH
Title: What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/02/04/12-bbq-terms-for-beginners/
Published Date: 02/04/20

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Grilling Recipes

Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs

Published

on



The single best barbecue experience I had in 2019 was at Blood Bros. BBQ in Houston. That's saying a lot given that I also had my first taste of many other establishments churning out top tier smoked meats—Truth BBQ, B's Cracklin' BBQ, Grady's Barbecue, Sam Jones BBQ, and Buxton Hall. What was so exhilarating about Blood Bros. to me was not just the quality, and every meat I tried was stellar, but the effortless melding of barbecue with other cultural influences. In general, this is what makes eating in Houston more exciting than most places, the melting pot of cultural inputs ends up outputting food in a manner that doesn't feel forced—it's not “Fusion” food, it's just their food. A group of Vietnamese friends started up Blood Bros., and the menu feels like an organic a sampling of everything they grew up eating in Houston that resonated with them. It's mostly Asian, but not strictly so, and sometimes Vietnamese, and other times not, like Thai sticky peanut butter ribs, which was one of the standout meats for me. During this quarantine period I was having very fond memories of those ribs and decided to make my own recipe for them as an ode to Blood Bros.

I have no idea what the Blood Bros. recipe is for these, I just knew that they blended Thai cuisine and American barbecue really well and didn't hold back on the spicy. So I used my personal knowledge of each cuisine to devise a recipe I thought would do the inspiration justice. It started with some homemade red curry paste, and I highly recommend making this stuff at home in a mortar and pestle for maximum flavor. I used the curry paste as the base of a wet rub, to which I added fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, and black pepper.

I then slathered the sauce all over a rack of St, Louis cut spare ribs. They definitely looked a lot different than the dry rubbed ribs I'm used to making, but I figured different is the right development path for this recipe.

Next I placed the ribs in the smoker that I had running at 225°F. I used a couple fist-sized chucks of apple wood to impart a light smokiness. I chose a more mellow wood because I thought without the heavy spice layer of normal barbecue, heartier woods could end up tasting a little too overpowering in this scenario.

Once the ribs were going, I went back inside and started on the sauce, which is the heart of the flavor of this recipe. I looked at my normal barbecue sauce recipe and started subbing out ingredients and changing quantities in a way that would make it taste like a melding of American barbecue sauce with Thai flavors. This began by swapping onions for shallots, which I sautéed and then added in a larger the usual amount of garlic along with ginger and Thai bird's eye chilies.

Then I whisked in the foundational ketchup with a fair amount of creamy peanut butter, providing the ribs namesake flavor and sticky character. To that I added rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, red curry paste, fish sauce, and lime juice. After cooking for bit to meld the flavors and thicken slightly, I seasoned the sauce with salt and pepper but something felt like it was missing. I was racking my brain on what to add to give the boost of flavor I thought was absent, and finally I had an idea—I added in a squeeze of tamarind concentrate and that ended up providing the perfect sour note and little extra savoriness to make the sauce feel complete.

With the usual barbecue ribs, the exterior starts to darken and turn overly brown or black after a few hours of smoking, which is why I spritz the ribs with a liquid—normally apple juice—when they hit a good mahogany color to avoid overcooking the rub. I had originally planned on doing that here, using rice vinegar to spray them down, but the ribs didn't turn a deep red until right at the end of cooking, so it wasn't needed at all.

At the same time they started to look beautiful, they were also almost done, which I tested by lifting one end of the rack with a pair of tongs and judging how they bent. So with just 30 minutes or so of smoking time left, I applied the sauce generously, wanting that thick and sticky sauce coating I experienced at Blood Bros.

And after the last stint in the smoker, they were done and looked good, but they were about to get a whole lot prettier thanks to a garnishing of cilantro, peanuts, and pepper slices.

By now my mouth was watering and my anticipation for a taste of these ribs had grown even more, making the obligatory photo shoot before eating feel even longer than it normally does. Upon that first bite, I was brought back to my memories of how excited I felt eating each dish at Blood Bros. While the ribs tasted familiar, they were not an exact copycat recipe, which in a way I preferred because they were more representative of my experience and skills, even if the original concept was not my own. They still had the seamless blend of cuisines going on for them, with the smoked pork and complex, layered sauce making them solidly American barbecue, but the overall flavors more reminiscent of Thai cuisine with a strong heat backed up by acidity and complimentary herbal notes. The peanut butter in the sauce also pushed them further in the Thai direction while also delivering the “sticky” promise of the recipe title. I can't wait to go back to Blood Bros. and try even more things, but the only problem is that there's so much great and utterly unique food in Houston that returning to the same place twice is not something I do often with all there is to try there that really can't be had, or at least doesn't feel the same, anywhere else.
Published on Thu May 7, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe
Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs Yield 4 servings Prep 30 Minutes Cook 6 Hours Total 6 Hours 30 Minutes Ingredients For the Sauce 1/2 cup finely minced shallots 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger 3 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced 1 cup ketchup 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup rice vinegar 1/3 cup palm or light brown sugar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon tamarind concentrate Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   For the Ribs 3 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 racks St. Louis-cut spare ribs 2 fist-sized chunks of light smoking wood, such as apple or cherry   For the Sauce 1/3 cup Roughly chopped roasted peanuts 3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 4 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced Procedure To make the sauce: Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in ketchup, peanut butter, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use. To make the ribs: In a small bowl, mix together sugar, curry paste, fish sauce, salt, and pepper. Remove membrane from back of each rack of ribs and trim meat of excess fat. Spread seasoning mixture all over each rack of ribs. ire up a smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunks of smoking wood when at temperature. When the wood is ignited and produces smoke, place the ribs in smoker or grill, meaty side up, and smoke until the ribs bend slightly when lifted from one end, 5-6 hours. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, brush top of each rack with sauce. Remove ribs from smoker and garnish with peanuts, cilantro, and chili slices. Slice ribs between bones and serve immediately.
You Might Also Like

barbecue,bbq,grilling,foodblogs,foodblog,nyc,new york city,meatwave,Barbecue,Recipes,Thai,Asian,Ribs,Pork

By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/thai-influenced-sticky-peanut-butter-ribs-recipe
Published Date: 05/07/20

Continue Reading

Grilling Recipes

Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad

Published

on


Who needs sous vide when you get results like this with the reverse sear method? I smoked (cherry wood) this bone in ribeye steak low and slow over indirect charcoal heat until reaching an internal temperature of 110f when we then cranked the heat for a direct sear over the live fire. Once the crust was perfect on our ribeye we let it rest for 10min before slicing and serving.  Used Fogo black for the rub.

Here is how it came out, and a link to the video for more details, process etc. 

If you'd like to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXF7pVm_pOI

Beef

By: unoriginalusername
Title: Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1224011/reverse-seared-bone-in-ribeye-for-an-awesome-steak-salad
Published Date: 05/07/20

Continue Reading

Grilling Recipes

10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master

Published

on


If you’re new to grilling and/or barbecuing, it can be difficult to know how to get started. Perhaps you’ve bought a book, such as Steven’s iconic How to Grill, or consulted a friend or family member who seems to know what they’re doing. Maybe you’ve haunted chat rooms or other social media groups, hoping to pick up a few pointers, only to become confused by terms like “reverse-sear” and the “3-2-1 method.”

But the easiest way to acquire this old-as-time skill is to just do it. Like anything worth mastering, it takes some practice. You’ll need to build up experience managing time and temperature, two variables that can really mess up a grill session.

To help you develop some traction during this, National Barbecue Month, we’ve selected ten of our favorite dishes that will acquaint you with the basics—direct versus indirect grilling, for example—but encourage you to expand your comfort zone. And if you have any questions, any at all, feel free to contact us for a personal response in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram. We’re always happy to help.

10 Recipes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
1. The Great American Burger

Burgers are often the first thing people crave when the first warm days of spring or early summer arrive. Nothing fancy here. Just old-fashioned goodness—a perfectly cooked burger oozing flavor and juice, dressed modestly with traditional accompaniments.

Get the Recipe »

 

2. Chicken Wings

Can’t get to Buffalo or your favorite wing joint? These Buffa-Que Wings soak for several hours in a spicy marinade before being smoke roasted to crisp-skinned perfection.

Get the Recipe »

 

3. First-Timer’s Ribs

This recipe is a blueprint for rib perfection, even if it’s your first experience barbecuing these meaty bones. If you’re cooking for more than three or four people, invest in a Best of Barbecue Rib Rack. It holds four racks of ribs upright in the space that normally accommodates one.

Get the Recipe »

 

4. NOLA Smoked Shrimp

Warning: Boiled shrimp will lose its allure once you’ve added smoked shrimp to your repertoire.

Get the Recipe »

 

5. Cattle Drive Steaks

We get it: Pricy Porterhouses and T-bones can make or break your reputation as a live fire cook. We have two bits of advice: Invest in an accurate instant-read thermometer (insert the probe through the side); and never desert your post. This steak gets a flavorful coffee-based rub before hitting the grill. But your favorite rub—like Montreal steak rub or even coarse salt and pepper—can be used, too.

Get the Recipe »

 

6. North Carolina Pulled Pork

This pulled pork with the alliteratively named Pig Picker Pucker Sauce takes its cues from Lexington, North Carolina. Pulled pork is hard to mess up as long as you’re patient and pull it while it’s still very hot to the touch. Meat claws and lined food-safe gloves make the job much easier.

Get the Recipe »

 

7. Basic Beer Can Chicken

Moist, succulent, and flavorful. And did we mention crisp skin? For more on Beer Can Chicken, read on.

Get the Recipe »

 

8. Planked Salmon with Maple Mustard Glaze

Indigenous people of the American Northwest were among the first to roast salmon over cedar, a cooking method that deserves its phoenix-like rise from history’s ashes. This method also avoids the problem of the fish sticking to the grill grate.

Get the Recipe »

 

9. Fireman’s Corn
Husked, grilled sweet corn is a revelation. You’ll never boil it again.

Get the Recipe »

 

10. Grilled Pineapple with Mezcal Whipped Cream

This incredibly easy dessert makes a fine finish to a grilled and/or barbecued meal. Fresh slices of pineapple are dredged in spiced sugar, carmelized on the grill, and served with whipped cream laced with mezcal, a smoky cousin of tequila. (Feel free to substitute tequila or rum.)

Get the Recipe »

 

Do you have any beginner barbecue questions? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Beef,Chicken,Homepage Feature,Hot Stuff,Pork,Recipes,Ribs,Seafood,burger,recipes,ribs,steak

By: Cialina TH
Title: 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/05/01/10-beginner-barbecue-recipes/
Published Date: 05/01/20

Continue Reading

Trending

%d bloggers like this: