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Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs

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The single best barbecue experience I had in 2019 was at Blood Bros. BBQ in Houston. That's saying a lot given that I also had my first taste of many other establishments churning out top tier smoked meats—Truth BBQ, B's Cracklin' BBQ, Grady's Barbecue, Sam Jones BBQ, and Buxton Hall. What was so exhilarating about Blood Bros. to me was not just the quality, and every meat I tried was stellar, but the effortless melding of barbecue with other cultural influences. In general, this is what makes eating in Houston more exciting than most places, the melting pot of cultural inputs ends up outputting food in a manner that doesn't feel forced—it's not “Fusion” food, it's just their food. A group of Vietnamese friends started up Blood Bros., and the menu feels like an organic a sampling of everything they grew up eating in Houston that resonated with them. It's mostly Asian, but not strictly so, and sometimes Vietnamese, and other times not, like Thai sticky peanut butter ribs, which was one of the standout meats for me. During this quarantine period I was having very fond memories of those ribs and decided to make my own recipe for them as an ode to Blood Bros.

I have no idea what the Blood Bros. recipe is for these, I just knew that they blended Thai cuisine and American barbecue really well and didn't hold back on the spicy. So I used my personal knowledge of each cuisine to devise a recipe I thought would do the inspiration justice. It started with some homemade red curry paste, and I highly recommend making this stuff at home in a mortar and pestle for maximum flavor. I used the curry paste as the base of a wet rub, to which I added fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, and black pepper.

I then slathered the sauce all over a rack of St, Louis cut spare ribs. They definitely looked a lot different than the dry rubbed ribs I'm used to making, but I figured different is the right development path for this recipe.

Next I placed the ribs in the smoker that I had running at 225°F. I used a couple fist-sized chucks of apple wood to impart a light smokiness. I chose a more mellow wood because I thought without the heavy spice layer of normal barbecue, heartier woods could end up tasting a little too overpowering in this scenario.

Once the ribs were going, I went back inside and started on the sauce, which is the heart of the flavor of this recipe. I looked at my normal barbecue sauce recipe and started subbing out ingredients and changing quantities in a way that would make it taste like a melding of American barbecue sauce with Thai flavors. This began by swapping onions for shallots, which I sautéed and then added in a larger the usual amount of garlic along with ginger and Thai bird's eye chilies.

Then I whisked in the foundational ketchup with a fair amount of creamy peanut butter, providing the ribs namesake flavor and sticky character. To that I added rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, red curry paste, fish sauce, and lime juice. After cooking for bit to meld the flavors and thicken slightly, I seasoned the sauce with salt and pepper but something felt like it was missing. I was racking my brain on what to add to give the boost of flavor I thought was absent, and finally I had an idea—I added in a squeeze of tamarind concentrate and that ended up providing the perfect sour note and little extra savoriness to make the sauce feel complete.

With the usual barbecue ribs, the exterior starts to darken and turn overly brown or black after a few hours of smoking, which is why I spritz the ribs with a liquid—normally apple juice—when they hit a good mahogany color to avoid overcooking the rub. I had originally planned on doing that here, using rice vinegar to spray them down, but the ribs didn't turn a deep red until right at the end of cooking, so it wasn't needed at all.

At the same time they started to look beautiful, they were also almost done, which I tested by lifting one end of the rack with a pair of tongs and judging how they bent. So with just 30 minutes or so of smoking time left, I applied the sauce generously, wanting that thick and sticky sauce coating I experienced at Blood Bros.

And after the last stint in the smoker, they were done and looked good, but they were about to get a whole lot prettier thanks to a garnishing of cilantro, peanuts, and pepper slices.

By now my mouth was watering and my anticipation for a taste of these ribs had grown even more, making the obligatory photo shoot before eating feel even longer than it normally does. Upon that first bite, I was brought back to my memories of how excited I felt eating each dish at Blood Bros. While the ribs tasted familiar, they were not an exact copycat recipe, which in a way I preferred because they were more representative of my experience and skills, even if the original concept was not my own. They still had the seamless blend of cuisines going on for them, with the smoked pork and complex, layered sauce making them solidly American barbecue, but the overall flavors more reminiscent of Thai cuisine with a strong heat backed up by acidity and complimentary herbal notes. The peanut butter in the sauce also pushed them further in the Thai direction while also delivering the “sticky” promise of the recipe title. I can't wait to go back to Blood Bros. and try even more things, but the only problem is that there's so much great and utterly unique food in Houston that returning to the same place twice is not something I do often with all there is to try there that really can't be had, or at least doesn't feel the same, anywhere else.
Published on Thu May 7, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

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Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs Yield 4 servings Prep 30 Minutes Cook 6 Hours Total 6 Hours 30 Minutes Ingredients For the Sauce 1/2 cup finely minced shallots 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger 3 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced 1 cup ketchup 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup rice vinegar 1/3 cup palm or light brown sugar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon tamarind concentrate Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   For the Ribs 3 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 racks St. Louis-cut spare ribs 2 fist-sized chunks of light smoking wood, such as apple or cherry   For the Sauce 1/3 cup Roughly chopped roasted peanuts 3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 4 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced Procedure To make the sauce: Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in ketchup, peanut butter, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use. To make the ribs: In a small bowl, mix together sugar, curry paste, fish sauce, salt, and pepper. Remove membrane from back of each rack of ribs and trim meat of excess fat. Spread seasoning mixture all over each rack of ribs. ire up a smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunks of smoking wood when at temperature. When the wood is ignited and produces smoke, place the ribs in smoker or grill, meaty side up, and smoke until the ribs bend slightly when lifted from one end, 5-6 hours. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, brush top of each rack with sauce. Remove ribs from smoker and garnish with peanuts, cilantro, and chili slices. Slice ribs between bones and serve immediately.
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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/thai-influenced-sticky-peanut-butter-ribs-recipe
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Include Barbecue Shrimp Recipe

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shrimp, grill, spit

Include Barbecue Shrimp Recipe

Summary: Get a barbecue shrimp recipe to create a variety of dishes you can serve on your next barbecue party.

How do you like the taste of barbecued chops or steak? If you love them, you must try barbecued shrimp for a change. Barbecued shrimp is as tasty as any barbecue can be. Just by imagining barbecued shrimp makes my mouth watery. You have tried pork, chicken, sausage, hotdogs, and other barbecued meat. Why not try barbecued sea foods this time. If you tried it probably in a party or in a restaurant, and you want to know the recipe, worry no more for you can have the barbecue shrimp recipe you fell in love with.

Barbecue shrimp recipe is a very simple one. The ingredients are not hard to find. Unlike other barbecue recipes you might have read which have “never-heard” ingredients. You know what I mean. I once saw a recipe book with a picture that made my stomach growl and when I tried to look at the ingredients, hoping I could have a taste of that delightfully, tasty, appetizing, and tempting dish, my jaw literally dropped up to my chest. And then I said where on Earth I can find these unfamiliar ingredients. The dish looked so simple that I thought it’s chicken feed and that I could do it even with my eyes closed (kidding!). I was so upset for a week because I lost the chance of savoring the unforgettable recipe. I don’t mean to sound so bubbly. I just want you to realize how a recipe can be if the ingredients are not available on the market. Well, barbecue shrimp recipe is not only simple to do, but the ingredients are literally available in any supermarket.

Barbecue Shrimp Recipe Ingredients:
o 2 lbs large raw and fresh shrimp, peeled
o 1 cup olive oil
o ¼ cup lemon juice
o ½ cup onion, finely chopped
o 3 shallots, fine chopped
o 2 garlic cloves, minced
o ¼ cup parsley, finely minced

Directions for cooking:
Prepare your outdoor grill or barbecue to medium heat. In a large bowl, mix together olive oil, lemon juice, onions, shallots, garlic, and parsley. Mix in the peeled shrimps. Cover and marinate in your refrigerator for at least two hours. Drain shrimp, reserve the marinade in a clean container for basting, place shrimps on skewers or on aluminum foil. Barbecue for 6-8 minutes on each side, and make sure to baste shrimps with marinade to enhance the flavor and to prevent from drying. Place shrimp on a large platter and garnish with thin lemon wedges on the sides. Serve with a creative salad, garlic bread, and most importantly the sauce for a more tempting presentation. This barbecue shrimp recipe serves 8-10 persons.

No matter how you cook the shrimp, it will still be yummy. But, I can assure you this barbecue shrimp is more than delicious. Actually, delicious in an understatement! Just the smell of it, makes your mouth watery! Try it and let your family and friends have a taste of your new discovered shrimp barbecue recipe.

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Barbecue Sauce For A Perfect Barbeque

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sauce, dip, cook

Barbecue Sauce For A Perfect Barbeque

When someone mentions barbecue images comes to the mind like cooking at the backyard grill, a social gathering, cooking outdoors and cooking meat slowly over wood and smoke that adds flavor to the food.

Different cooks have different preferences and style in their cooking. Some prefer rubbing the seasoning whether wet or dry prior to cooking and some prefers to soak the meat first in special marinades that could be sops, mops and finishing. The preparation and ingredients for marinating may differ from region to region the preferred wood to be used can also differ. However, no perfect barbecue will taste as good without the perfect barbecue sauce.

Barbecue sauces can generally be categorized by what they are based on. Common examples are tomato, vinegar and mustard based sauces. To give the barbecue its distinctive taste and prevent the meat from burning easily, barbecue sauces are applied to the meat while being cooked with the exemption of tomato based barbecue sauces as tomato based sauces burns easier than the other kinds of sauces.

Barbecue sauce preparation can either be sweet, sour, tangy, spicy, hot, thick or thin. The varieties are almost endless which makes barbecues popular because anyone can make his own special preparation depending on taste and anyone can create his own way of serving the barbecue.

Recipes for barbecues can also be guarded. And good barbecue sauces can be purchased at almost any store. But the only perfect barbecue sauce is the one that you can create for yourself.
Remember whatever works for you and your family can be a great barbecue sauce. So start experimenting that is the only way to start good cooking.

The basics of Barbecue sauces…

Tomato based barbecue sauce is the most widely used. Some say that it is the most popular. Its popularity however may be due to the simplicity of preparation and besides; tomatoes are ingredients that could easily be found. The point to remember in preparing tomato-based barbecue sauces is to cook the tomatoes very well in order for the flavor to blend with the other ingredients.

Tomato based barbecue sauces are acidic. Because of this, it has the property to breakdown all the flavor of other ingredients blending them with its own. But because of its propensity to burn, limit the usage of tomato based barbecue sauce while cooking. To make it even more flavorful, prepare tomato barbecue sauces a day in advance.

Mustard based sauces are preferred in North Carolina. The mustard based barbecue sauce is great for grilling pork.

Vinegar is great meat tenderizer. It is also more acidic than tomatoes. Because of its acidic content, vinegar based sauces has a tendency to penetrate deep into the meat. To make this barbecue sauce more flavorful, experiment mixing it with chili, cider vinegar or red pepper, sugar salt and all the other ingredients that you want it to have.

Barbecue sauces today has different uses departing from its traditional purpose. It now serves as a condiment that is present on almost any table like ketchup, salsa, salt, pepper and Tabasco.

However, if experimenting with food is not your greatest strength, you can always find great sauces in any store. To make great barbecues, one rule to follow is not to place too much weight on the “with smoke flavor” label that many bottled tomato sauces advertise itself. Smoke flavor is what is barbecuing all about. The flavor has to come from the wood not the bottle.

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There Is More Then One Way To Prepare the Perfect Swiss Steak

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swiss steak, sirloin, meat

There Is More Then One Way To Prepare the Perfect Swiss Steak

More than likely your recipe will call for either round or chuck steak, but you can also use cube steak.
The type of steak you use is entirely up to your palate. Swiss steak can also be either baked in the oven, cooked in a slow cooker or crockpot, or even cooked in a large skillet on top of the stove.
You will not find many recipes that tell you how you to cook Swiss steak on top of the stove, but it can be done.
If you decide to try to prepare one on your stove top use any of the recipes that you find, just cook on the stove top and check often.
These Swiss steak recipes call for them to be baked in the oven, but you can also prepare them in the above mentioned ways.
For the first recipe you will need the following ingredients:
a covered baking dish,
2 pounds of steak,
salt, pepper,
garlic powder,
1 onion sliced,
4 ounce can of drained mushrooms, and
1 15 ounce can of tomato sauce.
The first step is to cut your steak into serving sizes, season the steaks with the salt, pepper, and garlic powder.
Place the steak into a baking dish top with the onion slice.
Now, pour the mushrooms and tomato sauce on top. Kind of level the ingredients and bake covered for 1 ½ hours at 350 degrees. This recipe can also be prepared on top of the stove just as easy. Just remember to check on it and be sure that the liquid is not evaporating.
You can always add just a bit more tomato sauce or even a small amount of water if needed.
If you like your Swiss Steak a bit spiecier, try this one. You will need:
round or chuck steak, (tenderize the steak first),
15 ounce can of tomato sauce,
1 large onion sliced,
2 tablespoons of vinegar, and
8 ounces of your favorite picante sauce or salsa.
Place the steak in the baking dish, add the onion on top and then pour in the remainder of the ingredients. Bake at 250 degrees for around 20 minutes.
Serve with salad and (baked) potatoes.

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