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Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs

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The single best barbecue experience I had in 2019 was at Blood Bros. BBQ in Houston. That's saying a lot given that I also had my first taste of many other establishments churning out top tier smoked meats—Truth BBQ, B's Cracklin' BBQ, Grady's Barbecue, Sam Jones BBQ, and Buxton Hall. What was so exhilarating about Blood Bros. to me was not just the quality, and every meat I tried was stellar, but the effortless melding of barbecue with other cultural influences. In general, this is what makes eating in Houston more exciting than most places, the melting pot of cultural inputs ends up outputting food in a manner that doesn't feel forced—it's not “Fusion” food, it's just their food. A group of Vietnamese friends started up Blood Bros., and the menu feels like an organic a sampling of everything they grew up eating in Houston that resonated with them. It's mostly Asian, but not strictly so, and sometimes Vietnamese, and other times not, like Thai sticky peanut butter ribs, which was one of the standout meats for me. During this quarantine period I was having very fond memories of those ribs and decided to make my own recipe for them as an ode to Blood Bros.

I have no idea what the Blood Bros. recipe is for these, I just knew that they blended Thai cuisine and American barbecue really well and didn't hold back on the spicy. So I used my personal knowledge of each cuisine to devise a recipe I thought would do the inspiration justice. It started with some homemade red curry paste, and I highly recommend making this stuff at home in a mortar and pestle for maximum flavor. I used the curry paste as the base of a wet rub, to which I added fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, and black pepper.

I then slathered the sauce all over a rack of St, Louis cut spare ribs. They definitely looked a lot different than the dry rubbed ribs I'm used to making, but I figured different is the right development path for this recipe.

Next I placed the ribs in the smoker that I had running at 225°F. I used a couple fist-sized chucks of apple wood to impart a light smokiness. I chose a more mellow wood because I thought without the heavy spice layer of normal barbecue, heartier woods could end up tasting a little too overpowering in this scenario.

Once the ribs were going, I went back inside and started on the sauce, which is the heart of the flavor of this recipe. I looked at my normal barbecue sauce recipe and started subbing out ingredients and changing quantities in a way that would make it taste like a melding of American barbecue sauce with Thai flavors. This began by swapping onions for shallots, which I sautéed and then added in a larger the usual amount of garlic along with ginger and Thai bird's eye chilies.

Then I whisked in the foundational ketchup with a fair amount of creamy peanut butter, providing the ribs namesake flavor and sticky character. To that I added rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, red curry paste, fish sauce, and lime juice. After cooking for bit to meld the flavors and thicken slightly, I seasoned the sauce with salt and pepper but something felt like it was missing. I was racking my brain on what to add to give the boost of flavor I thought was absent, and finally I had an idea—I added in a squeeze of tamarind concentrate and that ended up providing the perfect sour note and little extra savoriness to make the sauce feel complete.

With the usual barbecue ribs, the exterior starts to darken and turn overly brown or black after a few hours of smoking, which is why I spritz the ribs with a liquid—normally apple juice—when they hit a good mahogany color to avoid overcooking the rub. I had originally planned on doing that here, using rice vinegar to spray them down, but the ribs didn't turn a deep red until right at the end of cooking, so it wasn't needed at all.

At the same time they started to look beautiful, they were also almost done, which I tested by lifting one end of the rack with a pair of tongs and judging how they bent. So with just 30 minutes or so of smoking time left, I applied the sauce generously, wanting that thick and sticky sauce coating I experienced at Blood Bros.

And after the last stint in the smoker, they were done and looked good, but they were about to get a whole lot prettier thanks to a garnishing of cilantro, peanuts, and pepper slices.

By now my mouth was watering and my anticipation for a taste of these ribs had grown even more, making the obligatory photo shoot before eating feel even longer than it normally does. Upon that first bite, I was brought back to my memories of how excited I felt eating each dish at Blood Bros. While the ribs tasted familiar, they were not an exact copycat recipe, which in a way I preferred because they were more representative of my experience and skills, even if the original concept was not my own. They still had the seamless blend of cuisines going on for them, with the smoked pork and complex, layered sauce making them solidly American barbecue, but the overall flavors more reminiscent of Thai cuisine with a strong heat backed up by acidity and complimentary herbal notes. The peanut butter in the sauce also pushed them further in the Thai direction while also delivering the “sticky” promise of the recipe title. I can't wait to go back to Blood Bros. and try even more things, but the only problem is that there's so much great and utterly unique food in Houston that returning to the same place twice is not something I do often with all there is to try there that really can't be had, or at least doesn't feel the same, anywhere else.
Published on Thu May 7, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

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Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs Yield 4 servings Prep 30 Minutes Cook 6 Hours Total 6 Hours 30 Minutes Ingredients For the Sauce 1/2 cup finely minced shallots 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger 3 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced 1 cup ketchup 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup rice vinegar 1/3 cup palm or light brown sugar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon tamarind concentrate Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   For the Ribs 3 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 racks St. Louis-cut spare ribs 2 fist-sized chunks of light smoking wood, such as apple or cherry   For the Sauce 1/3 cup Roughly chopped roasted peanuts 3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 4 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced Procedure To make the sauce: Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in ketchup, peanut butter, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use. To make the ribs: In a small bowl, mix together sugar, curry paste, fish sauce, salt, and pepper. Remove membrane from back of each rack of ribs and trim meat of excess fat. Spread seasoning mixture all over each rack of ribs. ire up a smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunks of smoking wood when at temperature. When the wood is ignited and produces smoke, place the ribs in smoker or grill, meaty side up, and smoke until the ribs bend slightly when lifted from one end, 5-6 hours. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, brush top of each rack with sauce. Remove ribs from smoker and garnish with peanuts, cilantro, and chili slices. Slice ribs between bones and serve immediately.
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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/thai-influenced-sticky-peanut-butter-ribs-recipe
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad

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Who needs sous vide when you get results like this with the reverse sear method? I smoked (cherry wood) this bone in ribeye steak low and slow over indirect charcoal heat until reaching an internal temperature of 110f when we then cranked the heat for a direct sear over the live fire. Once the crust was perfect on our ribeye we let it rest for 10min before slicing and serving.  Used Fogo black for the rub.

Here is how it came out, and a link to the video for more details, process etc. 

If you'd like to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXF7pVm_pOI

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By: unoriginalusername
Title: Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1224011/reverse-seared-bone-in-ribeye-for-an-awesome-steak-salad
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master

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If you’re new to grilling and/or barbecuing, it can be difficult to know how to get started. Perhaps you’ve bought a book, such as Steven’s iconic How to Grill, or consulted a friend or family member who seems to know what they’re doing. Maybe you’ve haunted chat rooms or other social media groups, hoping to pick up a few pointers, only to become confused by terms like “reverse-sear” and the “3-2-1 method.”

But the easiest way to acquire this old-as-time skill is to just do it. Like anything worth mastering, it takes some practice. You’ll need to build up experience managing time and temperature, two variables that can really mess up a grill session.

To help you develop some traction during this, National Barbecue Month, we’ve selected ten of our favorite dishes that will acquaint you with the basics—direct versus indirect grilling, for example—but encourage you to expand your comfort zone. And if you have any questions, any at all, feel free to contact us for a personal response in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram. We’re always happy to help.

10 Recipes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
1. The Great American Burger

Burgers are often the first thing people crave when the first warm days of spring or early summer arrive. Nothing fancy here. Just old-fashioned goodness—a perfectly cooked burger oozing flavor and juice, dressed modestly with traditional accompaniments.

Get the Recipe »

 

2. Chicken Wings

Can’t get to Buffalo or your favorite wing joint? These Buffa-Que Wings soak for several hours in a spicy marinade before being smoke roasted to crisp-skinned perfection.

Get the Recipe »

 

3. First-Timer’s Ribs

This recipe is a blueprint for rib perfection, even if it’s your first experience barbecuing these meaty bones. If you’re cooking for more than three or four people, invest in a Best of Barbecue Rib Rack. It holds four racks of ribs upright in the space that normally accommodates one.

Get the Recipe »

 

4. NOLA Smoked Shrimp

Warning: Boiled shrimp will lose its allure once you’ve added smoked shrimp to your repertoire.

Get the Recipe »

 

5. Cattle Drive Steaks

We get it: Pricy Porterhouses and T-bones can make or break your reputation as a live fire cook. We have two bits of advice: Invest in an accurate instant-read thermometer (insert the probe through the side); and never desert your post. This steak gets a flavorful coffee-based rub before hitting the grill. But your favorite rub—like Montreal steak rub or even coarse salt and pepper—can be used, too.

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6. North Carolina Pulled Pork

This pulled pork with the alliteratively named Pig Picker Pucker Sauce takes its cues from Lexington, North Carolina. Pulled pork is hard to mess up as long as you’re patient and pull it while it’s still very hot to the touch. Meat claws and lined food-safe gloves make the job much easier.

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7. Basic Beer Can Chicken

Moist, succulent, and flavorful. And did we mention crisp skin? For more on Beer Can Chicken, read on.

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8. Planked Salmon with Maple Mustard Glaze

Indigenous people of the American Northwest were among the first to roast salmon over cedar, a cooking method that deserves its phoenix-like rise from history’s ashes. This method also avoids the problem of the fish sticking to the grill grate.

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9. Fireman’s Corn
Husked, grilled sweet corn is a revelation. You’ll never boil it again.

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10. Grilled Pineapple with Mezcal Whipped Cream

This incredibly easy dessert makes a fine finish to a grilled and/or barbecued meal. Fresh slices of pineapple are dredged in spiced sugar, carmelized on the grill, and served with whipped cream laced with mezcal, a smoky cousin of tequila. (Feel free to substitute tequila or rum.)

Get the Recipe »

 

Do you have any beginner barbecue questions? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

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By: Cialina TH
Title: 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/05/01/10-beginner-barbecue-recipes/
Published Date: 05/01/20

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Grilling Recipes

A Quick and Dirty Guide to Cleaning Your Grill or Smoker

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If you’re reading this, chances are good you’ve been grilling throughout the winter and early spring. In any case, now is a perfect time to give your grill or smoker some love. A clean grill not only performs better, it makes you look like a professional.

Steven and I have written numerous blogs on spring grill maintenance. (See links to them below.) This is a distillation of that information with more emphasis on non-toxic cleaning products and useful tools to make the job easier. We’ll also share our best tips for getting your grill or smoker in prime condition for the grilling season ahead.

How to Clean Your Grill or Smoker
1. Spread a tarp over the area where you intend to work.
Before you begin, spread a large heavy-duty waterproof tarp over the area where you intend to work. Grease and carbonized debris can make quite a mess of your patio, driveway, or even the grass.

 

2. Fill a large bucket or tub with hot soapy water.
Fill a large bucket or tub—we like the rectangular bus tubs like those used in restaurants—with hot soapy water. A dishwashing detergent that’s good on grease, such as Dawn, works best.

 

3. Disconnect the gas tank.
Disconnect the gas tank. If it is nearly empty, set it aside for refilling. (To determine the gas level, pour boiling water over the shoulders of the tank. The gas line will reveal itself.) Transport it in a plastic milk crate like this one.

 

4. Loosen any food stuck to the grill grates.
Using a sturdy wire grill brush, loosen any food stuck to the grill grates. Remove the grates, warming rack, Flavorizer bars, drip pans or plates, ash catcher, grease bucket (on pellet grills), etc., and soak them in the hot soapy water. If they are too large for the bucket, slip them into a sturdy garbage bag with soap and water and set aside to soak. Dump any unused charcoal or ash.

 

5. Remove the burner tubes, if it’s an option.
On some gas grill models, the burner tubes are attached to the unit with a small screw or cotter pin. Remove them if it’s an option. Use a bent paper clip to clear any that appear to be plugged. If the burner tubes are not removable, cover them with heavy-duty foil. (Be sure to remove the foil before firing up your grill.)

 

6. If cleaning a pellet grill, remove all the pellets from the pellet bin.
If cleaning a pellet grill, remove all the pellets from the pellet bin, including any that remain in the augur or firebox. Under no circumstances do you want them to come in contact with water or moisture, as they will disintegrate and cause you all kinds of headaches.

 

7. Scrape the underside of the grill lid to loosen and remove carbonized debris.
With a plastic putty knife, pot scrubber, or other dull-bladed tool, scrape the underside of the grill lid to loosen and remove carbonized debris. (It will look like flaking paint.) Clean the firebox with a shop vacuum, using the putty knife to dislodge any burned-on bits.

 

8. Clean the gas line.
Clean the gas line with pipe cleaners or a similar tool—a chopstick wrapped with a paper towel, for example. This is often a hiding spot for spiders or other insects.

 

9. Wash the interior of the grill.
Wash the interior of the grill with hot soapy water and a plastic sponge or scrubby. (Metal scrubbies can easily scratch stainless steel.)

 

10. Sweep out any leaves or other debris from the lower cabinet.
If your grill has a lower cabinet, use a whisk broom to sweep out any leaves or other debris.

 

11. Clean the outside of the grill.
Clean the outside of the grill with hot soapy water, white vinegar, or a non-toxic stainless steel cleaner like Simple Green Stainless Steel Polish. (Try to work on a cloudy day for less streaking.) Polish following the “grain” of the finish. Use a soft toothbrush to clean outside knobs.

 

12. If you own a pellet grill, clean the inside of the chimney.
If you own a pellet grill, remove the cap (it will likely need a good soaking) and use a paint stick, dowel, or bottle brush to clean the inside of the chimney. Carefully wipe down the temperature probe (located inside the firebox) to ensure it continues to give you accurate readings. Clean WiFi-connected mechanisms following the manufacturer’s instructions.

 

13. Dry the grill with soft microfiber towels.
 

14. Scrub the grill grates and any other parts you’ve been soaking.
Scrub the grill grates and any other parts you’ve been soaking. If the debris is stubborn, sprinkle it with white vinegar and coarse salt or baking soda. Let sit for 30 minutes, then scrub vigorously; rinse with clean water from a garden hose.

We’ve discovered a pumice brick, often sold in the grilling section of hardware stores, is an effective tool for cleaning grill grates. (Do not use on porcelain grates.) Be sure to rinse well to remove any dust from the brick. If your grates are cast iron, dry them thoroughly after cleaning and coat with peanut oil.

Grill grates hopelessly rusted? Bite the bullet and invest in a new set. Ditto for any Flavorizer bars that have oxidized or burned through, or lava stones.

 

15. Replace the battery in your grill’s igniter.
If needed, replace the battery in your grill’s igniter. (Many people don’t realize it’s powered by batteries.)

 

16. Lubricate any moving parts (such as grill vents), with WD-40.
 

17. Reassemble the grill.
Reassemble the grill. If apropos, reconnect the gas tank (preferably topped off). Fire up the grill to burn off any soapy residue. Fifteen minutes should be sufficient.

 

18. Spritz your grill grates with water after each grill session to keep them looking pristine.
To keep your grill grates looking pristine, spritz them with water while they’re still screaming hot after each grill session. Any burned on bits of food or sauce should release easily. The process is a bit like deglazing a pan. If the grates are cast iron, finish your grill session by coating them lightly with vegetable oil.

 

19. Prepare a grilled or smoked feast to reward your hard work!
 

For additional blogs devoted to cleaning and maintaining your grill, click here.

Do you have any questions about cleaning your grill or smoker? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post A Quick and Dirty Guide to Cleaning Your Grill or Smoker appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

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By: Cialina TH
Title: A Quick and Dirty Guide to Cleaning Your Grill or Smoker
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/04/28/guide-to-cleaning-your-grill-or-smoker/
Published Date: 04/30/20

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