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Super Bowl Peach Butt

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Starting the process tonight for a 9 pound, post trim, pork butt. The brine is 10 ounces by weight of molasses, 12 ounces of pickling salt and about 1 gallon of filtered water. This will go 36 hours, then I will remove from the brine, dry it off and put a spicy/sweet rub and allow it to sit prior glazing in peach preserves then placing it on my XL, @ 225°F along with a boat load of peach chunks for a smoke for about 18 hours.
It does not suck. The mixing of the water, molasses and pickling salt is the only step, in preparation that requires a little time and effort. Will be adding more steps to the process and posting more images as we move forward. The peach glaze makes the best char. When we pull it from the egg, people will be in line, usually with a Pinot Noir in hand fighting for any chunks on left on the cooking grid. It is delicious.

Later my friends. Let me know if you have questions.

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By: YukonRon
Title: Super Bowl Peach Butt
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1227116/super-bowl-peach-butt
Published Date: 02/04/21

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Grilling Recipes

What to Grill or Smoke in February

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February is seen by many as a month to simply be endured—a penance to pay before late winter yields to spring. But it can be a great food month. Super Bowl Sunday (coming up on the 7th), is the second biggest eating day on the American calendar after Thanksgiving. It’s followed by Valentine’s Day on the 14th, and Mardi Gras, also known as “Fat Tuesday,” two days later. Of course, you don’t need an excuse to clear a path to your grill or smoker and make something wonderful to lift spirits and nurture the soul. Below are some of our favorite February dishes.

Seasonal Grilling Recipes for February 2021
1. Bayou Chicken Wings

Perfect for Super Bowl Sunday or Mardi Gras, these wings give their Buffalo cousins a run for their money. Their spiciness is cooled by an addictive Cajun Remoulade that we also like with tuna or shrimp.

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2. NOLA Smoked Shrimp

And speaking of shrimp, here’s another recipe that could be a hit at your Mardi Gras-themed meal, or any other time. Seasoned with a Cajun rub and smoked over pecan wood (or you could use almost anything but mesquite), they’re then introduced to a bayou-inspired barbecue sauce featuring bourbon, beer, brown sugar, and plenty of Worcestershire sauce. A keeper, for sure. Can be served as an appetizer or main course.

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3. Grilled Calçots (or Scallions or Leeks) with Romesco Sauce

Calçots, one of the sexiest alliums we know, are a source of celebration in February in their native Catalonia. Like a cross between a scallion and a leek, calçots—a kind of spring onion—are blackened over a wood fire (usually grapevines), then served in a cone of newspaper or on a roof tile. They are traditionally served with a brick-colored sauce called romesco, and are eaten by the kilo during their short season.

Calçots (pronounced cal soats) are nearly impossible to find in the U.S., but can be replaced by large scallions or small leeks. In the meantime, pray for travel restrictions to be lifted.

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4. Hay-Smoked Burgers with Rauchbier (Smoked Cheese) Sauce
Photo by Richard Dallett.

When the urge for a great burger hits, we recommend this smoke-kissed one. (You can find small quantities of hay at your local pet supply store.) Many of you have taken advantage of winter weather to cold-smoke cheese, and the sauce that accompanies this righteous burger is a worthy use for it. We call for cheddar, but feel free to substitute another smoked cheese. Any leftover sauce is great on smoke-roasted potatoes.

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5. Jamaican Jerk Spareribs

Need a break from winter? Transport yourself to the Caribbean, the birthplace of barbecue, with these incendiary but delectable bones. For authenticity, seek out Scotch bonnet chiles. But don’t worry if you have to substitute habaneros. You might associate jerk with chicken, but take our word for it—it’s terrific on spare ribs or baby backs. Chill a few Red Stripe beers before you start your cook.

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6. Planked Salmon with Maple Mustard Glaze

For years, this has been one of our most popular salmon recipes. Not only is it easy, but it relies on ingredients you likely have in your pantry: Dijon mustard, mayonnaise, and a spoonful of pure maple syrup. Though the recipe calls for soaking the plank for 1 hour in water, Steven now prefers to char one side of the plank over a hot fire before loading it with food to amplify the smoke flavor. Your choice.

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7. Smoked Chocolate Bread Pudding

Looking for a decadent dessert for Valentine’s Day, or any other day? Look no further. This recipe for bread pudding, which the restaurant Alden & Harlow shared with Steven when he was writing Project Smoke, is wonderful when served with whipped cream.

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What are you grilling this month? Share your grilling and BBQ photos with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post What to Grill or Smoke in February appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

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By: Cialina TH
Title: What to Grill or Smoke in February
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2021/02/05/what-to-grill-or-smoke-in-february/
Published Date: 02/05/21

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Grilling Recipes

Standing Rib Roast Help

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I am experimenting with a 4 day dry brine followed by an ultra low 200 degree cook then after along rest a 500 degree sear.  I have read numerous articles about the tenderizing process of allowing the enzymes to do their work as long as possible while keeping meat temps in a specific internal range.  The same process that lets the SV process work so well on tough cuts for long periods of time.  I have had great success using SV for rib roast as noted in the photos below.  I just want to try another method to compare.  Any experience with this method?

Beginning the 4 day dry brine process here.

Previous Sous Vide method.

EggHead Forum

By: Money_Hillbilly
Title: Standing Rib Roast Help
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1227172/standing-rib-roast-help
Published Date: 02/11/21

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Smoked Brisket Chili

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Back in July I really, really wanted some brisket for the 4th, so I smoked up a monster 17 pound slab of beef, but due the pandemic, I didn't have my usual posse of Meatwavers to help me finish the thing and my wife and I only put a small dent in the glorious piece of meat that came out of the smoker that day. While the absence of sharing of food has been the hardest thing for me to cope with in the past year, I saw this as an opportunity to finally make a plethora of leftover brisket recipes—something this site lacked because brisket is not something I usually have a lot of leftovers of. This had led to some excellent things like brisket waffle fries and brisket cheesesteaks, but the last recipe I worked on ended up being the best—smoked brisket chili.

I knew I wanted to make a chili out of a large chunk of that brisket, so I froze an entire section that was about three pounds in weight, which was mostly the flat, but had a bit of the point attached too. I was waiting for the right moment to cook this chili, and that arrived on Christmas day when my brother-in-law and his wife were going to stop by. That day was incredibly cold, and since we weren't doing indoor hangs, we decided to build a giant fire for warmth outside and a spicy bowl of chili felt like the perfect compliment for that setting.

At this point in my life, I'm pretty well versed in my chili making, which tends to lean towards all-meat Texas style, but with some touches I personally like. To start off, I always go for whole dried chilis that I toast until fragrant. I don't sweat the exact chilis that go into the mix, but I do like having a combination to hit various peppery notes. This time around I used mild New Mexicans, fruity anchos, lightly smoky guajillos, and spicy arbols.

Once those were all nice a toasty, I transferred them to a bowl, covered them with boiling water, and let them steep. In my early days, I would grind the chilies into a powder, but I've come to prefer steeping them because once they're tender, they more effectively break down and become a seamless sauce when blended.

While those steeped, I prepped the brisket, which I had defrosted under running cold water first. It was still pretty cold, which was good because it made it easier to slice into cubes roughly one and a half inches in size. I went for these relatively big chunks because I wanted some whole pieces of meat in the end, which I find preferable to meat that has completely broken down and is more mush than anything.

After fifteen minutes of steeping, I transferred the chilies to a blender and added in a cup of the steeping liquid too, reserving the rest in case I needed to use it thin out the chili at all while cooking. I added to that a chipotle in adobo, with some extra adobo sauce, and a can of fire roasted tomatoes. Texas-style chili recipes don't always go for the tomatoes, but I'm fan of using them because they create a much more attractive color as well as add a nice fruitiness and acidity that matches up well with the peppers.

Next step was to lightly brown a whole diced onion over medium-high heat and then add in the rest of the seasonings, which included jalapeño, garlic, cumin, and oregano.

I then added in the chili puree, brisket cubes, and a quart of beef stock. That last part I think is important because unlike a normal chili that simmers the beef for hours in the liquid, this cooked brisket really just needed to heat up, so it doesn't have the same opportunity to impart big beefy flavor to what would normally be water or chicken stock. I thought the beef stock was so important that I didn't use the canned stuff either, I went for my homemade, gelatin rich stock that I save for the recipes I care about most.

If you're making this, you'll realize there's far less liquid than a normal chili recipe, and that's because a long cook isn't required where liquid will evaporate and condense down. I actually deemed this chili down about an hour into cooking when the beef cubes were completely tender and some had started to break down, giving a good contrast of meaty textures. The final step was just stirring in some lime juice followed by masa harina, which I added in a tablespoon at a time until the chili reached my desired thickness.

I actually ate my bowl before we had to go sit out in the cold because of the need to photograph it first. I took photos during various stages of topping additions, and while once it was fully loaded you couldn't actually see the chili as well, it didn't look right to me until I had all that cheese, scallions, cilantro, sour cream, and, most importantly, Fritos, on top. I worried about how well using already fully cooked beef would work in a chili, but this ended up being my favorite red chili I've ever made! Rather than being a detriment, the brisket was way more flavorful than using raw beef thanks to its strong smoky character and darkened, peppery bark, which were traits well suited to go with a such a vibrant and spicy sauce whose acidity helped keep the chili from tasting overly rich. That made it easy to eat a whole bowl and then go back for seconds, and I luckily still had some leftovers at the end of the day that let me continue to enjoy the chili a couple more times before it was gone. And with that, my story of a mighty 17 pound brisket for two people finally comes to a close and while I certainly hope this year I'll be able to have friends and family over the next time I smoke one up, if that can't happen, at least I can find solace knowing that I can make another one and have it deliver joy over and over again throughout the year like this brisket did in 2020.
Published on Thu Feb 11, 2021 by Joshua Bousel

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Yield 6-8 servings

Prep 10 Minutes
Inactive 15 Minutes
Cook 1 Hour 20 Minutes
Total 1 Hour 45 Minutes

Ingredients
For the Chili
3 dried New Mexican chili peppers, stemmed and seeded
2 dried ancho chili peppers, stemmed and seeded
2 dried guajillo chili peppers, stemmed and seeded
2 dried arbol chili peppers, stemmed and seeded
1 quart boiling water
1 whole Chipotle chilies canned in adobo sauce, plus 1 tablespoon of adobo sauce from jar
1 14oz can fire roasted diced tomatoes
2 tablespoons canola oil
1 large yellow onion, finely diced
3 tablespoons finely diced fresh jalapeño peppers, seeded
4 teaspoons finely minced garlic (about 4 medium cloves)
4 teaspoons ground cumin
1 tablespoon dried oregano, preferably Mexican
1 quart of beef stock
3lbs smoked brisket, cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
3 tablespoons masa harina, plus more as needed
Kosher salt
 
For the Toppings (as desired)
Finely chopped fresh cilantro
Finely diced onions
Finely sliced scallions
Grated longhorn cheddar cheese
Diced avocado
Sour cream
Fritos
Procedure
Place New Mexican, ancho, guajillo, and arbol chilies in a large dutch oven placed over medium-high heat. Cook, stirring occasionally, until chilies are slightly toasted and very fragrant, 2 to 5 minutes. Remove dutch oven from heat and transfer chilies to a heatproof bowl. Cover chilies with boiling water and let steep for 15 minutes. Transfer chilies to the jar of blender. Add in chipotle pepper, adobo sauce, tomatoes, and 1 cup of the chili soaking liquid. Blend mixture at high speed until completely smooth. Set aside.
Heat oil in now empty dutch oven over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in onion and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned, about 7 minutes. Stir in jalapeño, garlic, cumin, and oregano and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add in chili puree, beef stock, and brisket. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a simmer, and cook until brisket is very tender and sauce has thickened slightly, about 1 hour. Add in additional chili soaking liquid as needed if chili thickens too much.
Stir in lime juice followed by masa harina. Add additional masa harina 1 tablespoon at a time as needed to reach desired thickness. Season with salt to taste. Serve immediately with desired toppings.

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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Smoked Brisket Chili
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/barbecue-smoked-brisket-chili-recipe
Published Date: 02/11/21

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