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Grilling Recipes

Smoked Potato Chips

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Who would have thought that something like smoked potato chips would be so amazingly good? I just had to try it and, as luck would have it, it worked out and the smoke flavor does something to the potato chips that you just have to experience for yourself.

Helpful Information

  • Prep Time: 3 minutes
  • Cook Time: 45 minutes
  • Smoker Temp: 180°F
  • Recommended Wood: A mix of mesquite and cherry*

*I used the REC TEC Bull for this project and this is the blend I chose to use for all of them. It was a great choice!

Step 1: Into Pan

Open the bag of potato chips and pour them into Weber grill pans or a large sheet pan.

If you don't have the Weber grill pans yet, then order some today.. they are all kinds of handy to have and the slots on the bottom let just enough smoke through without letting smaller items fall though not to mention they are made of very heavy duty stainless steel.

Pour the chips into the pan but make sure the smoke can get to all of them. Use two pans if necessary.

If you want to put some of my Jeff's original rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub) on them, spray them with the cooking oil so the rub will stick better then apply the rub to them generously on one side only.

The potato chips are now ready for the smoker.

Step 2: Smoke

Setup your smoker to maintain indirect heat of around 180°F or lower if possible. You do NOT need heat, only smoke, however, a little heat will not hurt them.

Once the smoke is going, place the pan(s) of chips into the smoker and close the lid.

Leave them alone for 45 minutes and try to not raise the lid until they are finished for maximum smoke flavor.

When the time has expired, remove them from the smoker and bring them into the house to cool.

Step 3: Devour

The smoked potato chips are delicious warm so you can eat them right away. Once they are cooled down, place them into zipper bags for storage.

Notes/Comments

The ones with the Jeff's original rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub) on them were very good but the ones with no seasoning were more smoky. Try them both ways and let me know what you think in the comments below.

Appetizers,Newsletter Archive,2020,Snacks

By: Jeff Phillips
Title: Smoked Potato Chips
Sourced From: www.smoking-meat.com/january-8-2020-smoked-potato-chips
Published Date: 01/08/20

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Cooking Tips

Taking Dinner Outdoors? Americans Get Their Grills On

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Taking Dinner Outdoors? Americans Get Their Grills On


While nearly everyone in America grills, not everyone is comfortable barbecuing more than the basics.
Here's an approach to grilling you can “steak” your reputation on:

Neighborhood grocery stores can help make the outdoor cooking experience easier by providing everything a griller needs under one roof. The Great Grilling program at Safeway features recipes, tools and high-quality ingredients for families that want to create delicious meals on the grill, and their Rancher's Reserve beef is guaranteed tender. The recipes were developed in the test kitchens of Sunset magazine to make it easier for shoppers to grill up a meal on the spur of the moment.

Whether using a charcoal or gas grill, having the right accessories on hand makes for easy and safe grilling-and even easier cleanup. A wide spatula, extra-long tongs, a long-handled brush and a spray bottle with water are the foundation for a great griller's tool kit.

Direct-heat grilling is best for thin cuts of meat that cook quickly. It gets them nicely browned on the outside in the short time they take to get done in the middle. Here's a surefire recipe using direct-heat grilling:

Flank Steak with Green Olive-Jalapeño Tapenade

A Mediterranean-inspired tapenade is a flavorful addition to this tender flank steak.

Prep time: About 20 minutes

Grill time: 13 to 17 minutes, plus 5 minutes to rest off the grill

Makes: 4 servings

1 jar (4.5 oz.) Safeway Select Stuffed Jalapeño Olives, drained

2 garlic cloves, peeled

1 cup coarsely chopped Italian parsley

2 tablespoons fresh rosemary leaves

1 tablespoon grated lemon peel

1/4 cup Safeway Select Verdi Olive Oil

1 Rancher's Reserve Flank Steak (about 11/2 lb.)

1. Prepare barbecue grill and preheat for direct-heat cooking. For charcoal grill, before you put the grill over the hot coals, brush it with a medium coat of oil; for gas grill, when hot, brush grill with a medium coat of oil.

2. Rinse olives and drain well. Combine olives, garlic, parsley, rosemary, lemon peel and oil in a food processor and pulse until mixture forms a fine paste. Set aside 1/2 cup of the tapenade mixture for seasoning meat; reserve remainder for serving or another use.

3. Rinse flank steak and pat dry. With the tip of a sharp knife, make shallow diagonal cuts about 1 inch apart over one side of steak, then make cuts perpendicular to the first to create a diamond pattern. Repeat on other side of steak.

4. Spread 1/2 cup of the olive mixture on both sides of steak to coat evenly.

5. Lay steak on oiled grill over a solid bed of hot coals or high heat on a gas grill. Keep charcoal grill uncovered; close lid on gas grill. Cook steak until browned on the bottom (lift edge with tongs to check), 8 to 10 minutes. With tongs or a wide spatula, turn steak and continue to cook until done as desired, about 2 minutes longer for rare (red in center; cut to test) or 4 minutes longer for medium-rare (pink in center).

6. Transfer steak to a clean platter or rimmed carving board and let rest about 5 minutes, then cut in thin, slanting slices across the grain to serve. Offer remaining tapenade to add to the meat to taste.

Beverage suggestions: A spicy, plummy zinfandel; a hoppy, English-style pale ale; or peppermint iced tea.

Tools: Grater (for peel), strainer or colander, measuring cups and spoons, food processor, paper towels, sharp knife, spatula for spreading, heatproof brush for oiling grill, tongs or wide spatula, platter or rimmed carving board.

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Grilling Recipes

What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know

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You can walk the walk, but can you talk the talk? Here is a mini-glossary of terms every self-respecting griller and pit master should know.


12 Key BBQ Terms You Should Know

Bark

The dark, flavorful crust that forms on the exterior of meat such as brisket, ribs, or pork shoulder that is comprised of seasonings (salt and other spices and/or herbs), smoke particulates, and the caramelization of the meats natural sugars. Wrapping in foil or butcher paper will soften the bark.

Burnt Ends

This term traditionally refers to the well-done, tougher, fattier, and/or oddly shaped bits of beef that were carved off for aesthetic reasons when brisket was sliced for service at Kansas City barbecue joints like Arthur Bryants. Once given to patient customers for free, burnt ends are now created on purpose. But they are no longer limited to beef brisket: we have seen recipes for pork butt, pork belly, and even hot dog burnt ends.

Deckle/Point

Brisket, the deep pectoral muscle of a steer (there are two per animal), can be divided into two discrete sections: the top one is the decklealso called the pointwhich attaches the muscle to the rib cage. It is both fattier and tougher than the flat (see below).

Flat

Many supermarkets remove the leaner, flatter cut of a steers pectoral muscle from the deckle (see above). It resembles a thick flank steak and has a pronounced grain. When sold together, the deckle and the flat comprise a whole brisket, often called a packer brisket.

Money Muscle

Well known to competition barbecuers, the so-called money muscle is a discrete cylindrical muscle that is part of a butchered pork shoulder. Located opposite the bone, it resembles a pork loin and is leaner than the rest of the shoulder. Because it cooks faster, this desirable cut is often removed from the shoulder (which is returned to the smoker) and sliced separately for the turn-in box.

Pink Curing Salt

Not to be confused with mined Himalayan salt (halite), which ranges in color from pink to apricot, pink curing salt has long been used as a preservative. Known by several namesPrague powder is one of thempink curing salt is comprised of table salt and sodium nitrite (for relatively short curing times) or sodium nitrate (for hams and other meats that require long curing times). Both forms also contain a small amount of food dye to tint them cotton candy-pink and distinguish them from other salts in your kitchen. (For information on how to use them, click here.)

Reverse-Sear

Most of us were taught that the best way to cook thicker cuts of meat (over 1 inch) was to sear them over direct heat and then finish them slowly using indirect heat. The result was meat that exhibited concentric circles of doneness from the outside in. Reverse-searing calls for heating the meat slowly using indirect heat to a temperature 10 to 15 degrees below your goal temperature, then searing it over high heat to brown and caramelize the outside. (For more information, click here.) We recommend it for thick steaks, chops, and prime rib.

Smoke Ring

Smoked meat (brisket, ribs, pork shoulder, chicken, etc.) often exhibits a pinkish-red ring just below the exterior surface. This is called a smoke ring, and is a desirable result of the meats natural myoglobin reacting with the compounds in smoke. Because smoke rings can be produced with curing salt (see pink curing salt above), they are no longer used to judge meat in barbecue competitions.

Shiner

This is a derogatory term used to describe ribs that have been inexpertly butchered, meaning the meat has been trimmed so close that the underlying bone is visible. It happens often with beef ribs that have been separated from the rib roast as its in the butchers financial interest to carve as much higher-priced meat off the bones. For beef ribs worth eating, buy a prime rib roast and remove the bones yourself.

Spatchcock

Spatchcocking is a technique that can be used on poultry (chickens, turkey, game hens, etc.) to maximize the surface area exposed to heat from the grill and to shorten cooking times. Using a sharp knife or kitchen shears, remove the backbone from the bird. Discard, or save to make stock. If desired, remove the breast cartilage.Turn the bird over and gently flatten with the palm of your hand.

Stall

The stall has panicked many barbecuers smoking their first briskets or pork shoulders. It refers to a temperature plateau that usually occurs when the meat reaches an internal temperature of 150 to 165 degrees, and can last for an interminably long time. Hours. Novicesmaybe expecting the in-laws for dinner at a pre-ordained timeoften make the mistake of increasing the heat, a maneuver that can toughen the meat (especially brisket). For some, the stall signals the moment when the meat should be wrapped in foil or butcher paper. See the Texas crutch below.

Texas Crutch

Sometimes used derisively, this term refers to wrapping slow-cooked meats in foil or butcher paper once they hit the stall, locking in moisture and effectively steaming the meat until it reaches the desired temperature, usually 203 degrees. Barbecue greats like Austins Aaron Franklin have given the method respectability. (Read about Aaron in Stevens book, The Brisket Chronicles.) Sometimes, the meat is unwrapped and finished naked to restore the bark, which softens in the moist environment.

Did we miss any basic barbecue terms? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Barbecue University,Homepage Feature,News & Information,grilling tips

By: Cialina TH
Title: What Are Burnt Ends? And 11 Other Key Terms You Should Know
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/02/04/12-bbq-terms-for-beginners/
Published Date: 02/04/20

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Grilling Recipes

Butternut Squash Tostadas

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Here is a great recipe that I found on MeatWave.com written by Joshua Bousel

As I sat down and started to ponder the best way to introduce this recipe for butternut squash tostadas, I thought I came up with a good segue from how a past foray with BlueApron had led me to learn the virtues of veggie tostada recipes. Then I was like, didn't I write something like that before, and indeed I did, over a year ago, and I also chronicled in that post my failure to cancel the service, even though my wife and I no longer use it. That reminded me that I still have yet to cancel and that I needed to go in and skip the next month of deliveries, but first I perused the current offerings and nothing looked as good or interesting as these tostadas that I devised on my own were, leaving me feeling still more confident in my creative abilities rather than relying on BlueApron, which didn't take long for us to tire of after signing up.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

I guess one plus of a meal delivery service is that you'll never put in as much work into a meal as these particular tostadas represent, but at the same time, you may never feel as satisfied with the end result. These tostadas certainly have their fair share of components, which makes it a somewhat lengthy recipe overall, even though no one single piece is that much of a challenge to cook, starting with these black beans that I made by first sautéing onions and garlic in butter, then adding in the beans and cumin before smashing everything into a creamy paste that would serve as the first layer of the final tostadas.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Next I made a green chili avocado salsa whose recipe I found on the very reliable salsa of Homesick Texan. The recipe began by roasting tomatillos and Anaheim peppers until they were soft and charred.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then, after peeling the skin from the peppers, those two items went into a blender along with an avocado, cilantro, garlic, and lime juice and got pureed until smooth. The final salsa was amazing, with an excellent depth that was tart, spicy, fruity, earthy, creamy, and fresh tasting all at once.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

I've seen packaged tostadas in the store before, so you could save a little time on this recipe by picking those up, but if you've ever made freshly fried tortilla chips before, you probably already know the virtues of making your own. Tortillas fry up quickly, so wasn't a huge time suck to cook about 24 street taco-sized tortillas for these, and I think to have to have the crunchiest, freshest tasting tostadas, it's totally worth any hassle frying represents.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

We had two or three veggie tostadas over our time as active Blue Apron customers, all of them using orange vegetables, and all tasting incredible. Oven roasting was the method for those, but grilling adds even more flavor, so when I decided to use butternut squash for my recipe, I knew they had to flame-roasted. Prior to cooking though, I tossed my squash slices in oil and a chili-heavy seasoning mixture.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then to grill them, I placed the rounds over indirect high heat and covered. I knew the squash would take a good 20 to 30 minutes to fully soften and brown, so I went back inside to prepare the rest of the toppings while it cooked.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

The remainder of the toppers required me to the slice up some radishes super thin on my mandoline, finely chop up a bit of fresh cilantro, and place sour cream into a squeeze bottle to make application easier and faster later on.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

At about the 20 minute mark of cooking, some squash slices were close to being done while others needed more time, so I rearranged them on grill accordingly, moving the more tender pieces further from the fire and the less done ones closer. I also flipped them for more even browning. After another 10 minutes or so, they were all very tender and had attractive caramelization, so I moved the squash slices to a cutting board and roughly diced them up.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then to assemble the tostadas I first spread a layer of the mashed black beans on each fried tortilla and then topped them all with some pieces of butternut squash. Next I applied squeezes of the salsa and sour cream, then adorned each tostada with radish slices, cilantro, and finely grated cotija cheese.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

While Blue Apron led to the idea of crafting some veggie tostadas for the blog, none that I ever got from the subscription meal service tasted as good or fully realized as these did. Taken altogether, these were a symphony of flavors and textures that worked incredibly well with one another. First came the crackling crunch of the corn tortilla which soon contrasted with the creamy beans and sweet squash. The salsa and sour cream next added spiciness and tang to the party while the cotija brought the salt, the radish a crisp and sharp bite, and the cilantro the boost of freshness that was started with by the avocado salsa. I wonder if this same time next year I'll be back saying once again that I have failed to cancel Blue Apron, which served a purpose for time to amp up my own creativity and desire to cook more balanced and veggie-focused meals, but really is no longer needed, even though it's literally been years now that I have failed to actually email them to ask them stop my subscription for good.

 

Butternut Squash Tostadas

A lot of components combine into one delicious whole in these sweet, creamy, tangy, fresh, and lightly spicy butternut squash tostadas.

  • Prep Time:
  • 1 Hour
  • Inactive Time:
  • 15 Minutes
  • Cook Time:
  • 20 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 1 Hour 35 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 12 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Black Beans
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped white onion
  • 1 tablespoon finely minced garlic (about 3 medium cloves)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 3 cups black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup water, plus more as needed
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Fresh ground black pepper, to taste
  • For the Salsa
  • 2 Anaheim and Hatch chiles
  • 1/2 pound tomatillos, husked and halved
  • 1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and roughly diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped cilantro leaves
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/4 cup water
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • For the Tostadas
  • 2 to 3 cups canola oil
  • 24 street taco-size corn tortillas
  • For the Butternut Squash
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch thick rounds or wedges
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup cotija cheese, finely grated
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 radishes, thinly slices

Procedure

  1. To make the beans: Melt butter in a medium saucepan set over medium heat. When foaming subsides, add in onions and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions have softened, but have not browned, about 5 minutes. Add cumin and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in beans and cook until warmed, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and, using a fork or potato masher, mash bean to desired consistency, thinning with water as necessary. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  2. To make the salsa: Preheat broiler. Roast chiles over an open flame on a gas stove or grill until skins are completely charred. Place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand until cooled, 5-10 minutes. Peel off charred skins; remove stems and seed poblanos. Place tomatillos, cut sides down, on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Transfer to broiler and cook until tomatillo skins have charred and flesh has softened completely. Transfer tomatillos to the jar of a blender along with chiles, avocado, garlic, cilantro, lime juice, and water. Puree until smooth. Season with salt to taste. Transfer salsa to a squeeze bottle or airtight container. Set aside.
  3. To make the tostadas: Heat oil in a 12-inch cast iron skillet, dutch oven, or wok over medium-high heat until it registers 375°F. Adjust flame to maintain temperature. Working in batches, add tortillas and fry until edges just start to brown. Flip tortillas over and continue to cook until crisp and light golden brown. Transfer tostadas to a paper towel lined tray, sprinkle with salt to taste, and let sit for 2 to 3 minutes to drain. Repeat with remaining tortillas. Set aside.
  4. To make the squash: In a small bowl, mix together chili powder, cumin, brown sugar, and salt. Place squash slices in a large bowl and add in oil and seasoning mixture. Toss to evenly coat squash in oil and seasoning. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place butternut squash rounds on cool side of grill, cover, and cook until tender throughout, 20 to 30 minutes. Transfer butternut squash to a cutting board and cut into a medium dice.
  5. To assemble the tostadas: Spread a layer of black beans on each tostada round. Top each with pieces of squash followed by a squeeze of the avocado salsa and sour cream. Sprinkle on cotija cheese and cilantro. Place a few radish slices on each tostada and serve immediately.

barbecue,bbq,grilling,foodblogs,foodblog,nyc,new york city,meatwave,Grilling,Recipe,Vegetarian,Mexican

 

By: Joshua Bousel
Title: Butternut Squash Tostadas
Sourced From: meatwave.com/blog/grilled-butternut-squash-tostadas-recipe
Published Date: 02/06/20

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