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Grilling Recipes

Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak

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When the pandemic-sponsored dust settles, I truly hope America’s archetypical steakhouses, those beloved palaces of gluttony, will be left standing. I would truly miss New York City’s clubby Delmonico’s, the oldest restaurant in the country. The Palm (multiple locations), with its cartoonish portraits (painted directly on the walls) of celebrities and politicians. The Cut in Los Angeles. Gibson’s Bar and Steakhouse in Chicago, where the martinis are as memorable as the Prime Angus. And all the unassuming family-owned steakhouses in the Heartland with their signature steaks, salad bars, and chatty waitstaffs.

I wouldn’t just miss the steaks, always cooked to sanguine perfection. I’d miss the cocktails, the appetizers and side dishes, the rich desserts—professionally-rendered Manhattans (preferably with Luxardo cherries), deftly dressed Caesar or wedge salads, tiered towers of iced shellfish, loaded baked potatoes, decadent bowls of creamed spinach, sautéed mushrooms, New York-style cheesecake.

But, just as you can cook spectacular steaks on your grill—especially now since Prime meats are often available online—you can replicate some of steakhouses’ most popular accompaniments at home, too. Here are some of our nominees.

Smoky Manhattan: As our friend Dave Stolte says, “A properly made Manhattan is truly a thing of beauty, capturing balance, excitement, and depth in four quick sips while priming your appetite for the evening ahead.” (Dave is the author of the just-released Home Bar Basics. Find more of his inspired grilled and smoked cocktails here.

Smoke-Roasted Oysters and Clams: Bacon, butter, jalapenos, and white wine combine to seduce even people who don’t think they like oysters and clams. Alternatively, serve a grilled shrimp cocktail.

Grilled Caesar Salad: Steven claims a Caesar salad was one of the first recipes he ever learned to make, and his expertise shines through in this recipe, first published in BBQ USA. Romaine lettuce is exposed to live fire just long enough to give it a hauntingly good smoke flavor while leaving it raw and crisp. It’s been a favorite at Barbecue University for years.

Grilled Breadsticks: Serve with the Caesar Salad above, but be sure to make extra as these batons of grilled bread are sure to be a hit.

Anchovy Cream: In the spirit of American steakhouses, long known for their heavy handedness with cream and butter, comes this umami-rich flavor bomb. Drizzle it over your steak (Steven recommends dry-brined rib-eyes) for a truly transcendent experience. Think you don’t like anchovies? We beg you—just try this recipe.

Hasselback Potatoes: Steakhouse potatoes are often large enough to challenge the passing skills of Tom Brady or Patrick Mahomes. Hasselbacks, named for the Swedish hotel and restaurant where they were invented, can be—if you want—smaller, but just as sexy. A series of parallel cuts are made through the side of the potato before smoke-roasting with butter and Parm. The outside of the potato is crusty while the inside is creamy. You’ll make these again and again.

Roasted Red Pepper Salad with Feta, Capers, and Pine Nuts: Even if you served a Caesar salad (see above) as one of the first courses in a steakhouse-style meal, this combination looks absolutely stunning on the plate. Especially if your garden, farmers’ market, or supermarket yields an array of colorful bell peppers. Steven first discovered it in Italy, where it’s called“Peperoni ai Ferri con Capperi e Pinoli.”

Smoked Cheesecake with Burnt Sugar Cream Sauce: This swoon-worthy dessert was the crown jewel in a sumptuous dinner we put together on the set of Project Smoke several years ago to celebrate Steven’s March birthday. Cheesecake is usually bake din a pan of simmering water, which cooks the filling while preventing it from cracking or curdling. In other words, low, slow, and moist. So naturally, we baked it in a smoker. The smoke gives the cheesecake an intriguing flavor—familiar, yet exotic.

The post Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Barbecue University™,Beef,Recipes,Recipes & Techniques,beef,recipes,side dish,steak

By: Molly Kay
Title: Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2021/02/19/eight-dishes-grilled-steak/
Published Date: 02/19/21

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Grilling Recipes

Jalapeño-Lime Chicken Skewers

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When I'm devising a marinade, I always taste it to ensure the flavor and seasoning are all in line with expectations. It's not uncommon for a marinade to get pushed in a directions that makes it taste a bit overboard on its own, but that's often needed because flavors will get diminished when the marinade is adorning its subject and has been cooked. There have been some marinades though that I try and think, “I'd eat that with a spoon.” I don't think I've actually developed a recipe though where the marinade purposefully did double duty as a meat seasoning and dip, so I figured I might as well give that shot and see how it works out. In the case of these jalapeño-lime chicken skewers, the answer was, surprisingly well.

The trickiest part of this recipe was finding the right balance to the sauce so it would taste good as a dip, but also have enough flavor to work as a marinade. To achieve that, I started with tangy Greek yogurt as a base since that seemed like a good direction for a dual purpose sauce. I pureed the yogurt in a blender with cilantro, cumin, jalapeño, garlic, and lime juice and zest. The result was a sauce that had a good hit of heat, hefty tang, and appealing green hue. The cumin and garlic also gave it some extra depth and nuance that I may have dialed up if this would have been used a marinade alone, but I knew would come out in the final dish after the chicken was dipped in the sauce.

Jalapeño-lime Chicken Skewers

Once I had the sauce settled, I took to the task of cubing up chicken for the skewers. I advocate for chicken thighs for this use in most instance because the added flavor and fat in the dark meat adds insurance to ending with juicy results. The only place breasts actually do better than thighs in this application is they cube up more nicely—for the thighs, I sometimes have to cut longer strips that I then fold over on the skewer to arrive at a more cube-like shape.

Jalapeño-lime Chicken Skewers

After the chicken was prepped, I moved it into a medium bowl and poured in roughly half the sauce. I tossed that to ensure the chicken was all well coated, then covered, and set it in the fridge. While the marinade had a fair amount of lime juice, the citric acid doesn't have such a drastic effect on the texture of the meat that it can't be left to marinate overnight. The marinade doesn't need that long though to do its work and I only let mine rest in the fridge for about six hours—prepping it in the morning and then cooking it in the mid-afternoon.

Jalapeño-lime Chicken Skewers

When the time came to grill, I skewered up the chicken and then lit a full chimney of coals. After letting the grill preheat, I placed the skewers over direct, high heat and let them cook. At the start, they stuck to the grates with might, but as they seared, the meat began to release and I was able to begin flipping.

Jalapeño-lime Chicken Skewers

I had to deal with some sticking still here and there, but nothing that a little extra scrape with the tongs couldn't handle. As each side was more evenly seared, I was able to move the chicken around easier, at which point I flipped and turned them more regularly so they would be well browned and cooked through all over. You can always test doneness with an instant-read thermometer—you're looking for between 160 to 165°F—but I found for this recipe, once everything was well browned, the chicken was definitely done, which took about ten minutes of grilling time total.

Jalapeño-lime Chicken Skewers

Following the glamour shots, I verified chicken itself had a very nice flavor. The marinade definitely was on the lighter side, but the brightness of the lime and cilantro came through along with a bit of earthiness from the cumin and fruitiness from the jalapeño, but with very little heat. That mellow, yet effective, flavor got a big boost after a dip in the reserved sauce, which brought in a lot of what was already happening, but in a more pronounced way that also delivered a nice spiciness which was balanced by the cooling yogurt. It definitely made a good case that a sauce can do dual work as a marinade and dip given the right attention to detail.

Published on Thu Sep 9, 2021 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe

  • Yield 4 servings
  • Prep 15 Minutes
  • Inactive 4 Hours
  • Cook 10 Minutes
  • Total 4 Hours 25 Minutes

Ingredients

  • For the Sauce
  • 2 cups Greek yogurt
  • 1/3 cup packed roughly chopped fresh cilantro
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1 medium jalapeño, stemmed and roughly chopped
  • 2 medium cloves garlic
  • 1 teaspoon grated lime zest
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon light brown sugar
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  •  
  • 2lbs chicken thighs, cut into 1 1/2-inch cubes
  • Metal or bamboo skewers
  • 2 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro, for garnish

Procedure

  1. To make the marinade: Place yogurt, cilantro, olive oil, lime juice, jalapeño, garlic, lime zest, soy sauce, cumin, and brown sugar in the jar of a blender. Puree until all ingredients are very finely chopped and sauce is green and smooth. Transfer 1/2 of sauce to a medium bowl, add in cubed chicken, and to evenly coat. Cover bowl and place in refrigerator and marinate for 4 hours to overnight. Transfer remaining sauce to an airtight container and place in refrigerator.
  2. Thread chicken onto skewers so each piece is touching the next.
  3. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Grill chicken, turning occasionally, until well browned on all sides and center of meat registers between 160-165°F on an instant read thermometer, about 10 minutes total. Transfer skewers to platter and let rest for 5 minutes. Garnish with cilantro and serve immediately with reserved sauce for dipping.

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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Jalapeño-Lime Chicken Skewers
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/grilled-jalapeno-lime-chicken-skewers-recipe
Published Date: 09/09/21

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Grilling Recipes

Hot Link Stuffed Tri-tip

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I used a long slender knife to make a cut all the way from the wide end of the tri-tip to the narrow end. I stopped just short of cutting through the narrow end.

The best way to do this is to make a cut all the way through then turn your knife about 45°F and make another cut all the way through.

Insert about a teaspoon of butter in the entryway..

Push the kielbasa, hotlink, etc. all the way in. If it's having too much trouble, try making the cavity just a little wider with your knife.

I used a link of all beef kielbasa with jalapeños in my stuffed tri-tip.

Sprinkle about 1.5 to 2 teaspoons of course kosher salt on the top side of the tri-tip. I use Morton's in the blue box since it is flaked and dissolves much faster and easier than most other kosher salt. Feel free to use another brand/kind but the amount may need to be modified slightly depending on its granule shape and size.

Please see my article on wet brining vs. dry brining for an in-depth look at this subject.

I also sprinkled it real good with my Texas style rub (Purchase formula here | Purchase bottled rub)

Place the tri-tip in the fridge overnight if possible or at least 4 hours to give the salt plenty of time to react with the meat.

Here it is after 10 hours.. ready to go in the smoker.

Setup your smoker for cooking at about 225°F using indirect heat. If your smoker uses a water pan, fill it up.

Once your smoker is heated up and producing smoke, place the tri-tip directly on the grate or you can use a pan/rack to ensure the smoke is able to get to all sides.

I used the Hasty Bake Legacy for this cook.. you can use any smoker or even the grill for this as long as you maintain the correct temperature and remove it when it reaches it's perfect finish temperature.

Let the tri-tip cook for 2 hours or until it reaches an internal temperature of 130°F. If you run at 275°F, it will get done in about an hour or less.

If you want to finish the tri-tip with a sear (recommended), remove it from the smoker when it reaches 110°F and place it on a very hot grill, griddle or iron pan. Sear all sides of the tri-tip and don't forget the sides/edges.

On the Hasty Bake you simply need to remove the deflector over the charcoal pan and raise the pan so that it sits right below the grates in the “sear” position.

Watch the meat carefully and turn as required to sear evenly.

Once the tri-tip is finished cooking, set it on a cutting board and slice it according to the diagram on THIS PAGE.

Just beautiful!!

All sliced up!

Great recipe, Rob! It was really cool having a piece of sausage/hot link nestled into each slice and the flavor was out of this world!

Beef,Newsletter Archive,2021,Sausage,Tri-tip

By: Jeff Phillips
Title: Hot Link Stuffed Tri-tip
Sourced From: www.smoking-meat.com/april-29-2021-hot-link-stuffed-tri-tip
Published Date: 04/29/21

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Grilling Recipes

Mad Scientist BBQ Spare Ribs v2.0

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Smoked another slab or ribs and this time I started up the XL slowly to better control the temp. Rubbed with a little Kosher Salt and Oakridge Dominator Sweet Rib Rub. Smoked for 4 hours at 225. Ramped temp up to 275 gradually for an hour. Then wrapped in foil for 30 minutes. Unwrapped and glazed with Rufus Teague Honey Sweet for 30 minutes. This time each rib was moist compared to my last attempt. I believe this is because I was able to control the temp better by not opening the dome several times to spritz. Next time I may go back to Salt and Pepper for the rub and apply 2 hours prior to the cook. My thermapen was probing tender after the short wrap and the temp was 190 internal.

EggHead Forum

By: dstearn
Title: Mad Scientist BBQ Spare Ribs v2.0
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1227749/mad-scientist-bbq-spare-ribs-v2-0
Published Date: 04/26/21

Did you miss our previous article…
https://amazinghamburger.com/outdoor-cooking/wet-brining-vs-dry-brining/

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