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Do You Know the Difference? BBQ Terms to Master

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When you become a griller or barbecuermaybe youre on your way to becoming a true pit masteryou have to learn a whole new vocabulary. Almost a different language. And from your email or your posts on social media, we sense there are some barbecue terms you are confused about. One of them is pork tenderloin versus pork loin, a distinction that can make a huge difference in a recipe. In this, the first of a series, were going to help clear up any confusion and suggest recipes to illustrate all. Please feel free to suggest other bbq terms to us (anonymously, if you want) for explanation.

Whats the Difference Between Baby Back Ribs and Spare Ribs?

Huli-Huli Spare Ribs

Baby Back Ribs

Cut from high on the hog, these flattish ribs are attached to the backbone and are perceived to be more tender and less fatty than spare ribs. Usually weighing about 2 pounds per slab, baby backs are often favored by home and competition barbecuers alike.

Spare Ribs

Closer to the belly, spare ribs are larger and more curved as they approach the breastbone. A rack typically weighs 3 pounds or more and is meatier and fattier than a rack of baby backs. Theyre often sold as St. Louis-style ribs, which means the butcher has accentuated their rectangular shape by trimming the tips and cartilage. Preferred by in the know pit masters.

Baby Back Ribs and Spare Ribs Recipes:

Whats the Difference Between Shrimp and Prawns?

Grill-Top Shrimp Boil

Shrimp

In North America, these succulent crustaceans are commonly called shrimp, unless they are larger. (Shrimp sold as U-10s, for example10 pieces per poundare sometimes labeled prawns to increase their appeal on restaurant menus or justify a higher price.)

Prawns

Confusingly, the term prawns is preferred to shrimp in Ireland, India, and South Africa as well as Commonwealth countries like the UK, New Zealand, and Australia. Scientifically, however, prawns differ from shrimp in structure, reproductive habits, and environmental preferences: Most shrimp are harvested from salt water, while prawns come from fresh water. Happily, prawns and shrimp are interchangeable in the kitchen or on the grill or smoker.

Shrimp and Prawn Recipes:

Whats the Difference Between Pork Loin and Pork Tenderloin?

Pork Loin Reuben

Pork Loin

This lean, boneless cylinder of meat is not only one of the most economical cuts at the butcher counter, but is very versatile. Its attached to the top of the ribs at the backbone. Weighing up to 5 pounds or more (smaller portions are often sold as center-cut pork roasts), it can be indirect grilled, spit-roasted, stuffed, or even cut into individual steaks and grilled directly. It is most tender when cooked to 145 degrees (pink) or slightly beyond. Do not use this cut to make pulled pork as cooking it to 195 will make the meat impossibly dry.

Pork Tenderloin

Visually, size distinguishes pork tenderloin from pork loin. The former weighs about a pound and is often vacuum-sealed in packages of two. (One tenderloin feeds two average appetites or one large one.) Its a small, little-exercised muscleits used for posture, not locomotionnear the pigs lower back, extending into the ham. Very tender and flavorful when not overcooked. It is a great candidate for marinating. Be sure to trim off any visible silverskin before direct grilling.

Pork Loin and Pork Tenderloin Recipes:

Whats the Difference Between Pork Shoulder and Picnic Ham?

St. Louis Pork Steaks

Pork Shoulder

Often called pork butt or Boston butt, pork shoulder is the preferred cut for barbecuing low and slow, especially for pulled pork. Well-marbled, it can also be cross-cut into pork shoulder steaks, which is a specialty of St. Louis (see a link to the recipe below). Usually sold bone-in in 3 to 5 pound portions.

Picnic Ham

The lower part of the pork shoulder (see above) is called the picnic ham. The bone to meat ratio is higher and it requires longer smoking times to break down the fat, muscle, and tendons. Less expensive than pork butt but very flavorful, its a great cut to smoke when you need ham-like smoked meat to flavor soups, collard greens, etc.

Pork Shoulder Recipes:

Whats the Difference Between Direct Grilling and Indirect Grilling?

How to Grill A Safe But Juicy Burger

Direct Grilling

This is the simplest, most straightforward, and widely practiced method of grilling on Planet Barbecue. Its the method used to cook thinnish, tender, quick-cooking foods over a hot fire. They might include chicken breasts or thighs, thinner steaks or chops, burgers, hot dogs, shrimp, fish fillets, kebabs, sliced vegetables, sliced bread, etc. Set up a small kettle grill, hibachi, or even a Tuscan grill in your fireplace or over a campfire, and youre in business!

Indirect Grilling

Indirect grilling refers to a cooking method in which you cook food next tonot directly overthe fire. (Steven prefers to indirect grill between two fires.) It is also the method used for true barbecue. Use it when cooking whole or thicker foodswhole chickens or turkeys, prime rib, beef tenderloin, pork loin roasts, pulled pork, beef or veal brisket, dense vegetables or fruits (like whole onions, cabbages, or apples), whole fish, whole hams, leg of lamb, planked foods, and more.

Indirect Grilling Recipes:

What barbecue terms and techniques would you like to learn more about? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post Do You Know the Difference? BBQ Terms to Master appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Barbecue University,News & Information,Recipes & Techniques,barbecue university,bbq u,grilling tips

By: Cialina TH
Title: Do You Know the Difference? BBQ Terms to Master
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/02/21/beginner-bbq-terms-to-master/
Published Date: 02/21/20

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Grilling Recipes

Camping Make-Ahead Breakfast Burritos

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1 hr 20 mins | Yield 10 | September 5, 2020 | Updated: September 5, 2020 by Kita
Camping Make-Ahead Breakfast Burritos
This post may contain affiliate links. Please read my disclosure policy

Whether you are prepping for a camping trip or just want to stock the freezer with an easy grab and go breakfast, these make-ahead breakfast burritos are individually wrapped favorites every time!

This post was sponsored by the Idaho Potato Commission. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

I'm not sure if it's the mountain air or sleeping in a tent, but camping makes me hungry! Luckily, the whole crew can fuel up with my favorite make ahead breakfast burritos.

I love making these in big batches because they are perfect to freeze and pack for camping trips. Plus, they are huge. No one complains about being hungry til supper and for me, when camping, the fewer dishes the better.

Oh, and if you really want to stretch your dollar, you can use up leftovers as the meaty fillings! Pretty much my MO in all my camping recipes.

Tips for Making Burritos Ahead of Time

For quick success when making burritos it's important to cook and prep all of your fillings ahead of time. Once you start filling and rolling, you don't want to stop because you forgot an ingredient.

Have all the fillings prepped and a large clean work surface to lay out all of the burritos on and fill in one swoop, like an assembly line. Then you can wrap and store them, making quick work for this recipe and even easier reheating later.

How to keep them from getting soggy

When prepping the burritos for freezing there are a few handy tricks to avoiding anything from getting soft over time.

Cook and cool everything completely before filling. This prevents steam from the hot foods creating moisture that would otherwise get trapped in. Don't add salsas, or sauces, or pretty much anything that comes with a liquid or oil base. Because, over time, that will make things soggy. Don't use fruits or veggies that will soften and release liquid. Like avocados. They just get mushy. Or tomato slices…. you get where I am going with this. Wrap and store well. Any freezer burn, ice crystals, or thaw and freeze is never good when it comes to keeping a good texture in foods. Freezing homemade burritos

Once you have prepped these burritos, tightly wrap them in parchment paper and store them in a resealable bag, with as much air removed as possible.

You can freeze burritos for up to 3 months. But if I am going to keep them that long, I also wrap them in foil to prevent ice crystals forming on them (which is another tip to prevent soggy burritos).

How to cook burritos on the campfire

When you are ready to reheat the burritos at camp, make sure you have a low and even fire going. A blazing fire looks pretty but Smokey the bear doesn't think that's safe, and nor does it create an ideal cooking environment.

Remove them from the baggie and parchment paper. (If you are at home, reheating these in the microwave, parchment paper is no big thing, but at a campfire, it's not the best way to re-heat anything that you don't want to catch on fire).

Rewrap the burritos tightly in aluminum foil before tossing them over the coals. You can toss the burritos right onto the side of the embers, if you have built an offset fire, making sure to rotate them for even cooking. Or place them on a grilling grate above the fire.

Just have someone standing by to rotate them every so often so the heat is hitting all the spots evenly. No one likes that random cold bite of burrito. No one.

Pro tip: If you don't have frozen tots on hand, use up leftovers as the potato filling – like these cast iron fries that are amazing as burrito filling.

Make-Ahead Breakfast Burritos

This make-ahead recipe has everything set to cook over the campfire with hearty potato and egg filled burritos that are going to fuel you through any hike and all day long.

Course: Breakfast
Cuisine: American, Camping, Fusion

Prep Time45 mins
Cook Time30 mins
Resting Time5 mins
Total Time1 hr 20 mins

Servings: 10

InstructionsCook the Crispy Tots:Preheat oven to 400 degrees or to what the directions on the packaged potatoes instruct.
Arrange the potato tots on a baking sheet in a single layer.
Bake until the potato tots are golden and crispy, shaking the tray gently, halfway through cooking time to rotate the tots.
When thoroughly crisped and golden on all sides, remove from oven and allow to cool completely.
Scramble the Eggs:Whisk the eggs in a large bowl.
Preheat a large non-stick skillet over medium-high heat.
Pour the eggs in and allow curds to form.
Gently, using a rubber spatula, fold in the eggs, a little at a time as they form.
When the eggs are just set, still showing a glean of moisture, remove them from the heat and season with salt and pepper as desired.
Spoon the eggs onto a plate to prevent them from overcooking in the heat of the skillet and allow them to cool completely.
Toast the Poblano Pepper:Using a flame from a gas range, or over a grill, toast the poblanos over high heat on all sides, rotating as each side begins to blacken and blister.
Place the peppers in foil and wrap.
Allow the peppers to sit for 5 minutes until cool.
By now, the skin will have softened and you can peel it off of the peppers, discarding it.
Chop the now peeled peppers, discarding the seeds, and set aside.
Cook the Sausage:Add 1 tsp of butter to In the now empty skillet, sautee the onion until soft, about 4 minutes.
Add the sausage and cook, breaking up into small pieces and browning thoroughly all over, about 15 minutes.
Add the chopped poblano peppers.
Remove from heat and allow to cool completely.
Assemble the Burritos:On a large clean work surface, arrange all of the tortillas out.
Place 2 slices of cheese down the center of each.
Arrange 12 crispy potato tots in the in rows of 3 on the center over the cheese.
Top with equal portions of eggs, beans, sausage and veggie mix, and bacon.
Carefully fold the edges a burrito up, over the filling, before rolling. Use your thumbs to hold in the filling as you roll.
Place seam side down to keep from opening up while you complete rolling all the burritos.
Wrap Burritos for Freezing:Tightly wrap each burrito in parchment paper.
Then wrap each burrito in an additional layer of heavy-duty aluminum foil.
Line them all up on a baking sheet and allow them to freeze for 1 hour before storing in a resealable bag for up to a month.
Date the bag with a permanent marker for later use.
Place in the freezer until ready to use.
Cook the Burritos:When ready to cook, preheat your grill or campfire for indirect heat. See note.
Place the burritos, in foil, directly on the coals on the cooler side of the campfire or on the cooler side of the grill.
Grill the burritos for about 30-35 minutes.
Rotate every 10 minutes, turning evenly on all sides to ensure even cooking until the burritos are warmed through and the cheese is melted.

NotesThis recipe works best if everything is cooked ahead of time and allowed to cool completely before assembling the burritos. This allows the liquids to evaporate or steam to cool, which would otherwise cause moisture to make the burritos soggy.
When cooking outside, the elements will be a factor for if the burritos need to heat longer before being enjoyed.
Indirect heat is when the fire is built to one side while the other side remains cooler. Do this by stacking the coals of a campfire to one side of the grill pit, or turning one burner to low or off on a gas grill.

Nutrition

Nutrition Facts

Make-Ahead Breakfast Burritos

Amount Per Serving (1 g)

Calories 0

* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

breakfast,Campfire Cooking,Camping Foil Recipes,GC Original,Grilling,Pork,SP

By: Kita
Title: Camping Make-Ahead Breakfast Burritos
Sourced From: girlcarnivore.com/camping-make-ahead-breakfast-burritos/
Published Date: 09/05/20

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Grilling Recipes

Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak

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When the pandemic-sponsored dust settles, I truly hope America’s archetypical steakhouses, those beloved palaces of gluttony, will be left standing. I would truly miss New York City’s clubby Delmonico’s, the oldest restaurant in the country. The Palm (multiple locations), with its cartoonish portraits (painted directly on the walls) of celebrities and politicians. The Cut in Los Angeles. Gibson’s Bar and Steakhouse in Chicago, where the martinis are as memorable as the Prime Angus. And all the unassuming family-owned steakhouses in the Heartland with their signature steaks, salad bars, and chatty waitstaffs.

I wouldn’t just miss the steaks, always cooked to sanguine perfection. I’d miss the cocktails, the appetizers and side dishes, the rich desserts—professionally-rendered Manhattans (preferably with Luxardo cherries), deftly dressed Caesar or wedge salads, tiered towers of iced shellfish, loaded baked potatoes, decadent bowls of creamed spinach, sautéed mushrooms, New York-style cheesecake.

But, just as you can cook spectacular steaks on your grill—especially now since Prime meats are often available online—you can replicate some of steakhouses’ most popular accompaniments at home, too. Here are some of our nominees.

Smoky Manhattan: As our friend Dave Stolte says, “A properly made Manhattan is truly a thing of beauty, capturing balance, excitement, and depth in four quick sips while priming your appetite for the evening ahead.” (Dave is the author of the just-released Home Bar Basics. Find more of his inspired grilled and smoked cocktails here.

Smoke-Roasted Oysters and Clams: Bacon, butter, jalapenos, and white wine combine to seduce even people who don’t think they like oysters and clams. Alternatively, serve a grilled shrimp cocktail.

Grilled Caesar Salad: Steven claims a Caesar salad was one of the first recipes he ever learned to make, and his expertise shines through in this recipe, first published in BBQ USA. Romaine lettuce is exposed to live fire just long enough to give it a hauntingly good smoke flavor while leaving it raw and crisp. It’s been a favorite at Barbecue University for years.

Grilled Breadsticks: Serve with the Caesar Salad above, but be sure to make extra as these batons of grilled bread are sure to be a hit.

Anchovy Cream: In the spirit of American steakhouses, long known for their heavy handedness with cream and butter, comes this umami-rich flavor bomb. Drizzle it over your steak (Steven recommends dry-brined rib-eyes) for a truly transcendent experience. Think you don’t like anchovies? We beg you—just try this recipe.

Hasselback Potatoes: Steakhouse potatoes are often large enough to challenge the passing skills of Tom Brady or Patrick Mahomes. Hasselbacks, named for the Swedish hotel and restaurant where they were invented, can be—if you want—smaller, but just as sexy. A series of parallel cuts are made through the side of the potato before smoke-roasting with butter and Parm. The outside of the potato is crusty while the inside is creamy. You’ll make these again and again.

Roasted Red Pepper Salad with Feta, Capers, and Pine Nuts: Even if you served a Caesar salad (see above) as one of the first courses in a steakhouse-style meal, this combination looks absolutely stunning on the plate. Especially if your garden, farmers’ market, or supermarket yields an array of colorful bell peppers. Steven first discovered it in Italy, where it’s called“Peperoni ai Ferri con Capperi e Pinoli.”

Smoked Cheesecake with Burnt Sugar Cream Sauce: This swoon-worthy dessert was the crown jewel in a sumptuous dinner we put together on the set of Project Smoke several years ago to celebrate Steven’s March birthday. Cheesecake is usually bake din a pan of simmering water, which cooks the filling while preventing it from cracking or curdling. In other words, low, slow, and moist. So naturally, we baked it in a smoker. The smoke gives the cheesecake an intriguing flavor—familiar, yet exotic.

The post Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Barbecue University™,Beef,Recipes,Recipes & Techniques,beef,recipes,side dish,steak

By: Molly Kay
Title: Eight Delectable Side Dishes For Grilled Steak
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2021/02/19/eight-dishes-grilled-steak/
Published Date: 02/19/21

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Grilling Recipes

BACON BUTTERMILK MEATLOAF | Recipe | BBQ Pit Boys

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This Bacon Buttermilk Meatloaf is probably the best meatloaf you're ever going to taste, it’s packed with flavor and real easy to make as shown here by the BBQ Pit Boys

By: BBQ Pit Boys
Title: BACON BUTTERMILK MEATLOAF | Recipe | BBQ Pit Boys
Sourced From: www.youtube.com/watch?v=OpHecqfEB_o
Published Date: 01/23/21

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