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Grilling Recipes

Cajun Grilled Shrimp Tacos

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A daring fusion of Baja and Cajun cuisine with fresh grilled shrimp, crispy slaw, and a spicy lime crema all ready in under 20 minutes!  

This recipe was sponsored by Tony Chachere's. Thoughts and opinions are my own. 

Truth. Tacos are my love language. I mean really, can one have a taco it not be a happy thing – no matter what the taco or filling is? But then when you have shrimp, it's like the perfect happy bite every single time.

Thing is, I have traveled the world, and Central America and the islands are some of my favorite places. Weather, people, all of it. And of course, the food. There's just a brightness and freshness to all of it – and you can't not have seafood! 

This is not an authentic Mexican or Baja recipe – this is a quick, easy, and light recipe for when you want a ton of flavor and minimal prep time with the perfect cabbage crunch and hit of lime and cilantro! 

Consider these tacos de camerones a Cajun spin on a Baja classic. With a spicy rub down from Tony Chachere's Original Creole Seasoning, the shrimp are fired off on the grill and then nestled into warmed tortillas and topped with a tangy vinegar-based slaw before a spiced lime crema goes on top! And it's all ready in under 20 minutes! That is happiness in a bite. Ok, every bite. 

And, I'm doing something good for myself, cuz, shrimp tacos are totally healthy, right? Well, like all things, moderation. I am not going to say slathering crema over every bite is a good idea, but this isn't a cheese-covered heavy protein. And given each one is only around 7 calories each (for a medium one), it's certainly a healthy meal by my dietary standards. Balance is everything and only you know what's best for you. 

So, what do you need? 

Start with fresh thawed shrimp, peeled (otherwise, get to work), Tony Chachere's original Creole Seasoning (unless you are feeling BOLD and then well, go for their BOLD seasoning… sorry for the bad word choice there), cabbage, jalapenos, and some other basic pantry staples like vinegar, onion lime, garlic. 

Pro Tip: I am all for saving pennies, but cabbage is hard to justify if you don't have a few meals planned with it. Even on sale for $0.69, they are dense and it will add up. So, if this is a one time use for you, price out the convenient bags of pre-sliced slaw mix for less food waste.

Bout that crazy good shrimp taco sauce…

All you need is 4 ingredients for the Spicy Lime Crema – the perfect taco sauce! The crema used could be substituted for a sour cream mayo blend if you can't find it, but check your local markets cold Latin section first. I use crema all of the time as a smooth option for toppings and blends. And omg, drizzled over nachos its better (and less heavy feeling, than sour cream.     

Filling, slaw, sauce – let's get to dinner! 

How to Make Grilled Shrimp Tacos

Step one – and the most important – Make sure the grill is ready when you are – my first trick when seamlessly getting through any cook. Just like cooking with an oven, you have to let the grill heat up before you can cook on it. Also, make sure the grates are well cleaned and oiled. No need to sacrifice any to that nasty stick when the grates aren't well cleaned. 

  1. Prep the slaw ahead and let it sit while you grill the shrimp and warm the tortillas. Whisk the crema up and be ready to go when the shrimp come off the grill. Dinner literally can be a 20-minute thing – unless you add like 3 minutes to shake up a killer margarita to pair with it. 
  2. Season and skewer them for easy cooking.
  3. You can also cook these just tossing them on the grill, but with a skewer or even those wire grilling crates for seafood make flipping these babies easier. I absolutely LOVE the Tony Chachere's on these as a kicked up spice blend that I don't have to overthink. It's got the perfect amount of flavor and heat to really make these shrimp taste incredible. 
  4. Remove the Shrimp from the Skewers and Enjoy!

Pro Tip: Peeled shrimp are quick to work with and make this meal a breeze, however, I do love grilling shrimp with the shells still on – I feel like it really locks in the juicy flavor. If you want to grill these with the shells on, rub them down with the Tony's beforehand, and then once they are grilled, sprinkle with a bit more while they are still hot after you have quickly peel them. 

Yep, these are really the easiest Shrimp taco recipe with a devilish crunchy cabbage slaw and spicy sauce! 

What goes with tacos?

Tacos, in my expert foodie opinion, stand alone on a platter. They are the be all end all of the meal but making sure the fixings that are paired with them harmonize is crucial homemade guacamole and salsa are a MUST to serve with spicy shrimp tacos. And to be honest, black beans and yellow rice are also perfect sides when you are looking to balance out the plate. Grilled pineapple and mango salsa are perfect additions as well for a burst of sweet fruit flavor. And for those who want to pull a little attention away from the taco, elotes are pretty magical to serve with grilled shrimp tacos too. 

Want more tasty taco recipes? Here ya go!

If you've tried this Cajun creation please rate the recipe and let me know where you found it in the comments below.
I get inspired by your feedback and comments! You can also join in on the adventures on Instagram @girlcarnivoreTwitter Facebook.

So easy and so delicious grilled shrimp tacos with a Cajun rub, slaw and lime crema

Cajun Grilled Shrimp Tacos

This quick and easy grilled shrimp recipe is a fusion of Baja and Cajun flavors with a bold rub and fresh tangy slaw – all ready in under 20 minutes!

Print Pin Rate

Course: Main Course

Cuisine: Fusion

Prep Time: 5 minutes

Cook Time: 15 minutes

Servings: 4

Calories: 377kcal

Equipment

  • grill

  • Grilling Skewers

  • Mixing Bowls

  • Whisk

Ingredients

  • 1 lbs Shrimp, Large 31/35 thawed peeled and deveined
  • 2 tbsp Olive oil
  • 4 tbsp Tony's Seasoning

For the Tangy Vinegar Slaw

  • 1 tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 1 tsp Pineapple Juice
  • 1 cup Red Cabbage chopped
  • 1 cup Cabbage chopped
  • 2 cloves Garlic minced
  • ¼ Onion sliced
  • ½ Jalapenos minced
  • 1 Granny Smith Apple sliced

For the Spicy Lime Crema:

  • ½ cup Mexican Crema
  • 1 tbsp Tony Chachere's
  • 1 tsp Tequila
  • 1 tsp Lime juice
  • 1 tbsp fresh Cilantro finely minced
  • Freshly ground black pepper

For Assembly

  • Fresh Cilantro
  • Tortillas
  • 1 Avocado
  • Fresh Pico de gallo

Instructions

Heat the Tortillas:

  • When the grill is warm and ready, wrap the tortillas in a double layer of foil and place over cooler side of the grill. Allow the tortillas to heat up, flipping the package once or twice to avoid burning the outer most tortilla.

Prep and Make the Tangy Vinegar Slaw:

  • In a small bowl, whisk the vinegar

  • In a large bowl toss the cabbage, julienned apple, sliced onion, and minced garlic with the vinegar to coat. Let sit, covered for 5 minutes and toss again to make sure the flavors are incorporated.

Prep and Make the Spicy Lime Crema:

  • In a small mixing bowl, whisk the crema, Tony Chachere's, tequila, lime juice, and cilantro together.

  • Set aside.

Grill the Shrimp:

  • Evenly divide the shrimp onto the skewers, brush with olive oil and season liberally with Tony Chachere's Creole Seasoning.

  • Place on the grill and cook for 2 to 3 minutes per side, flipping once, until the shrimp are opaque and cooked through.

  • Remove from heat and carefully slide the shrimp off the skewers.

Notes

  • Shrimp sizes can be tricky, ranging from small to colossal. I used large shrimp 31/35 for this recipe but medium would also work. 
  • Heating the tortillas in foil instead of directly on the grill keeps them from getting too dry and brittle. So that they are warm when serving, but still soft and pliable.
  • You can substitute agave or honey for the pineapple juice if you don't have any on hand.
    If you are serving littles, skip the tequila in the crema.
  • Crema can be made and stored in an airtight container in the fridge up to 2 days ahead.
  • Slaw can be made up to a day ahead, but it loses crunch over time, so it's best within 24 hours.
  • Pro Trick (or one all taco lovers already mastered): Double the tortilla layers because corn tortillas break – so this helps keep everything in perfect taco form!

Hey, I'm Kita, the Meat Maven, outdoor junkie, campfire connoisseur, adventure-seeking and world traveled recipe developer and photographer behind GirlCarnivore.com. My mission is to break down savory eats and inspire you to get a little grit under your nails while having fun with your food. READ MORE

GC Original,Grilling,Seafood and Fish,SP,Twisted Tacos,cajun shrimp tacos,tony chachere's

By: Kita
Title: Cajun Grilled Shrimp Tacos
Sourced From: girlcarnivore.com/cajun-grilled-shrimp-tacos/
Published Date: 02/17/20

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Grilling Recipes

Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs

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The single best barbecue experience I had in 2019 was at Blood Bros. BBQ in Houston. That's saying a lot given that I also had my first taste of many other establishments churning out top tier smoked meats—Truth BBQ, B's Cracklin' BBQ, Grady's Barbecue, Sam Jones BBQ, and Buxton Hall. What was so exhilarating about Blood Bros. to me was not just the quality, and every meat I tried was stellar, but the effortless melding of barbecue with other cultural influences. In general, this is what makes eating in Houston more exciting than most places, the melting pot of cultural inputs ends up outputting food in a manner that doesn't feel forced—it's not “Fusion” food, it's just their food. A group of Vietnamese friends started up Blood Bros., and the menu feels like an organic a sampling of everything they grew up eating in Houston that resonated with them. It's mostly Asian, but not strictly so, and sometimes Vietnamese, and other times not, like Thai sticky peanut butter ribs, which was one of the standout meats for me. During this quarantine period I was having very fond memories of those ribs and decided to make my own recipe for them as an ode to Blood Bros.

I have no idea what the Blood Bros. recipe is for these, I just knew that they blended Thai cuisine and American barbecue really well and didn't hold back on the spicy. So I used my personal knowledge of each cuisine to devise a recipe I thought would do the inspiration justice. It started with some homemade red curry paste, and I highly recommend making this stuff at home in a mortar and pestle for maximum flavor. I used the curry paste as the base of a wet rub, to which I added fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, and black pepper.

I then slathered the sauce all over a rack of St, Louis cut spare ribs. They definitely looked a lot different than the dry rubbed ribs I'm used to making, but I figured different is the right development path for this recipe.

Next I placed the ribs in the smoker that I had running at 225°F. I used a couple fist-sized chucks of apple wood to impart a light smokiness. I chose a more mellow wood because I thought without the heavy spice layer of normal barbecue, heartier woods could end up tasting a little too overpowering in this scenario.

Once the ribs were going, I went back inside and started on the sauce, which is the heart of the flavor of this recipe. I looked at my normal barbecue sauce recipe and started subbing out ingredients and changing quantities in a way that would make it taste like a melding of American barbecue sauce with Thai flavors. This began by swapping onions for shallots, which I sautéed and then added in a larger the usual amount of garlic along with ginger and Thai bird's eye chilies.

Then I whisked in the foundational ketchup with a fair amount of creamy peanut butter, providing the ribs namesake flavor and sticky character. To that I added rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, red curry paste, fish sauce, and lime juice. After cooking for bit to meld the flavors and thicken slightly, I seasoned the sauce with salt and pepper but something felt like it was missing. I was racking my brain on what to add to give the boost of flavor I thought was absent, and finally I had an idea—I added in a squeeze of tamarind concentrate and that ended up providing the perfect sour note and little extra savoriness to make the sauce feel complete.

With the usual barbecue ribs, the exterior starts to darken and turn overly brown or black after a few hours of smoking, which is why I spritz the ribs with a liquid—normally apple juice—when they hit a good mahogany color to avoid overcooking the rub. I had originally planned on doing that here, using rice vinegar to spray them down, but the ribs didn't turn a deep red until right at the end of cooking, so it wasn't needed at all.

At the same time they started to look beautiful, they were also almost done, which I tested by lifting one end of the rack with a pair of tongs and judging how they bent. So with just 30 minutes or so of smoking time left, I applied the sauce generously, wanting that thick and sticky sauce coating I experienced at Blood Bros.

And after the last stint in the smoker, they were done and looked good, but they were about to get a whole lot prettier thanks to a garnishing of cilantro, peanuts, and pepper slices.

By now my mouth was watering and my anticipation for a taste of these ribs had grown even more, making the obligatory photo shoot before eating feel even longer than it normally does. Upon that first bite, I was brought back to my memories of how excited I felt eating each dish at Blood Bros. While the ribs tasted familiar, they were not an exact copycat recipe, which in a way I preferred because they were more representative of my experience and skills, even if the original concept was not my own. They still had the seamless blend of cuisines going on for them, with the smoked pork and complex, layered sauce making them solidly American barbecue, but the overall flavors more reminiscent of Thai cuisine with a strong heat backed up by acidity and complimentary herbal notes. The peanut butter in the sauce also pushed them further in the Thai direction while also delivering the “sticky” promise of the recipe title. I can't wait to go back to Blood Bros. and try even more things, but the only problem is that there's so much great and utterly unique food in Houston that returning to the same place twice is not something I do often with all there is to try there that really can't be had, or at least doesn't feel the same, anywhere else.
Published on Thu May 7, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe
Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs Yield 4 servings Prep 30 Minutes Cook 6 Hours Total 6 Hours 30 Minutes Ingredients For the Sauce 1/2 cup finely minced shallots 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger 3 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced 1 cup ketchup 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup rice vinegar 1/3 cup palm or light brown sugar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon tamarind concentrate Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   For the Ribs 3 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 racks St. Louis-cut spare ribs 2 fist-sized chunks of light smoking wood, such as apple or cherry   For the Sauce 1/3 cup Roughly chopped roasted peanuts 3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 4 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced Procedure To make the sauce: Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in ketchup, peanut butter, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use. To make the ribs: In a small bowl, mix together sugar, curry paste, fish sauce, salt, and pepper. Remove membrane from back of each rack of ribs and trim meat of excess fat. Spread seasoning mixture all over each rack of ribs. ire up a smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunks of smoking wood when at temperature. When the wood is ignited and produces smoke, place the ribs in smoker or grill, meaty side up, and smoke until the ribs bend slightly when lifted from one end, 5-6 hours. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, brush top of each rack with sauce. Remove ribs from smoker and garnish with peanuts, cilantro, and chili slices. Slice ribs between bones and serve immediately.
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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/thai-influenced-sticky-peanut-butter-ribs-recipe
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad

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Who needs sous vide when you get results like this with the reverse sear method? I smoked (cherry wood) this bone in ribeye steak low and slow over indirect charcoal heat until reaching an internal temperature of 110f when we then cranked the heat for a direct sear over the live fire. Once the crust was perfect on our ribeye we let it rest for 10min before slicing and serving.  Used Fogo black for the rub.

Here is how it came out, and a link to the video for more details, process etc. 

If you'd like to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXF7pVm_pOI

Beef

By: unoriginalusername
Title: Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1224011/reverse-seared-bone-in-ribeye-for-an-awesome-steak-salad
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master

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If you’re new to grilling and/or barbecuing, it can be difficult to know how to get started. Perhaps you’ve bought a book, such as Steven’s iconic How to Grill, or consulted a friend or family member who seems to know what they’re doing. Maybe you’ve haunted chat rooms or other social media groups, hoping to pick up a few pointers, only to become confused by terms like “reverse-sear” and the “3-2-1 method.”

But the easiest way to acquire this old-as-time skill is to just do it. Like anything worth mastering, it takes some practice. You’ll need to build up experience managing time and temperature, two variables that can really mess up a grill session.

To help you develop some traction during this, National Barbecue Month, we’ve selected ten of our favorite dishes that will acquaint you with the basics—direct versus indirect grilling, for example—but encourage you to expand your comfort zone. And if you have any questions, any at all, feel free to contact us for a personal response in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram. We’re always happy to help.

10 Recipes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
1. The Great American Burger

Burgers are often the first thing people crave when the first warm days of spring or early summer arrive. Nothing fancy here. Just old-fashioned goodness—a perfectly cooked burger oozing flavor and juice, dressed modestly with traditional accompaniments.

Get the Recipe »

 

2. Chicken Wings

Can’t get to Buffalo or your favorite wing joint? These Buffa-Que Wings soak for several hours in a spicy marinade before being smoke roasted to crisp-skinned perfection.

Get the Recipe »

 

3. First-Timer’s Ribs

This recipe is a blueprint for rib perfection, even if it’s your first experience barbecuing these meaty bones. If you’re cooking for more than three or four people, invest in a Best of Barbecue Rib Rack. It holds four racks of ribs upright in the space that normally accommodates one.

Get the Recipe »

 

4. NOLA Smoked Shrimp

Warning: Boiled shrimp will lose its allure once you’ve added smoked shrimp to your repertoire.

Get the Recipe »

 

5. Cattle Drive Steaks

We get it: Pricy Porterhouses and T-bones can make or break your reputation as a live fire cook. We have two bits of advice: Invest in an accurate instant-read thermometer (insert the probe through the side); and never desert your post. This steak gets a flavorful coffee-based rub before hitting the grill. But your favorite rub—like Montreal steak rub or even coarse salt and pepper—can be used, too.

Get the Recipe »

 

6. North Carolina Pulled Pork

This pulled pork with the alliteratively named Pig Picker Pucker Sauce takes its cues from Lexington, North Carolina. Pulled pork is hard to mess up as long as you’re patient and pull it while it’s still very hot to the touch. Meat claws and lined food-safe gloves make the job much easier.

Get the Recipe »

 

7. Basic Beer Can Chicken

Moist, succulent, and flavorful. And did we mention crisp skin? For more on Beer Can Chicken, read on.

Get the Recipe »

 

8. Planked Salmon with Maple Mustard Glaze

Indigenous people of the American Northwest were among the first to roast salmon over cedar, a cooking method that deserves its phoenix-like rise from history’s ashes. This method also avoids the problem of the fish sticking to the grill grate.

Get the Recipe »

 

9. Fireman’s Corn
Husked, grilled sweet corn is a revelation. You’ll never boil it again.

Get the Recipe »

 

10. Grilled Pineapple with Mezcal Whipped Cream

This incredibly easy dessert makes a fine finish to a grilled and/or barbecued meal. Fresh slices of pineapple are dredged in spiced sugar, carmelized on the grill, and served with whipped cream laced with mezcal, a smoky cousin of tequila. (Feel free to substitute tequila or rum.)

Get the Recipe »

 

Do you have any beginner barbecue questions? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Beef,Chicken,Homepage Feature,Hot Stuff,Pork,Recipes,Ribs,Seafood,burger,recipes,ribs,steak

By: Cialina TH
Title: 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/05/01/10-beginner-barbecue-recipes/
Published Date: 05/01/20

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