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Grilling Recipes

Butternut Squash Tostadas

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Here is a great recipe that I found on MeatWave.com written by Joshua Bousel

As I sat down and started to ponder the best way to introduce this recipe for butternut squash tostadas, I thought I came up with a good segue from how a past foray with BlueApron had led me to learn the virtues of veggie tostada recipes. Then I was like, didn't I write something like that before, and indeed I did, over a year ago, and I also chronicled in that post my failure to cancel the service, even though my wife and I no longer use it. That reminded me that I still have yet to cancel and that I needed to go in and skip the next month of deliveries, but first I perused the current offerings and nothing looked as good or interesting as these tostadas that I devised on my own were, leaving me feeling still more confident in my creative abilities rather than relying on BlueApron, which didn't take long for us to tire of after signing up.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

I guess one plus of a meal delivery service is that you'll never put in as much work into a meal as these particular tostadas represent, but at the same time, you may never feel as satisfied with the end result. These tostadas certainly have their fair share of components, which makes it a somewhat lengthy recipe overall, even though no one single piece is that much of a challenge to cook, starting with these black beans that I made by first sautéing onions and garlic in butter, then adding in the beans and cumin before smashing everything into a creamy paste that would serve as the first layer of the final tostadas.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Next I made a green chili avocado salsa whose recipe I found on the very reliable salsa of Homesick Texan. The recipe began by roasting tomatillos and Anaheim peppers until they were soft and charred.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then, after peeling the skin from the peppers, those two items went into a blender along with an avocado, cilantro, garlic, and lime juice and got pureed until smooth. The final salsa was amazing, with an excellent depth that was tart, spicy, fruity, earthy, creamy, and fresh tasting all at once.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

I've seen packaged tostadas in the store before, so you could save a little time on this recipe by picking those up, but if you've ever made freshly fried tortilla chips before, you probably already know the virtues of making your own. Tortillas fry up quickly, so wasn't a huge time suck to cook about 24 street taco-sized tortillas for these, and I think to have to have the crunchiest, freshest tasting tostadas, it's totally worth any hassle frying represents.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

We had two or three veggie tostadas over our time as active Blue Apron customers, all of them using orange vegetables, and all tasting incredible. Oven roasting was the method for those, but grilling adds even more flavor, so when I decided to use butternut squash for my recipe, I knew they had to flame-roasted. Prior to cooking though, I tossed my squash slices in oil and a chili-heavy seasoning mixture.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then to grill them, I placed the rounds over indirect high heat and covered. I knew the squash would take a good 20 to 30 minutes to fully soften and brown, so I went back inside to prepare the rest of the toppings while it cooked.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

The remainder of the toppers required me to the slice up some radishes super thin on my mandoline, finely chop up a bit of fresh cilantro, and place sour cream into a squeeze bottle to make application easier and faster later on.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

At about the 20 minute mark of cooking, some squash slices were close to being done while others needed more time, so I rearranged them on grill accordingly, moving the more tender pieces further from the fire and the less done ones closer. I also flipped them for more even browning. After another 10 minutes or so, they were all very tender and had attractive caramelization, so I moved the squash slices to a cutting board and roughly diced them up.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

Then to assemble the tostadas I first spread a layer of the mashed black beans on each fried tortilla and then topped them all with some pieces of butternut squash. Next I applied squeezes of the salsa and sour cream, then adorned each tostada with radish slices, cilantro, and finely grated cotija cheese.

Butternut Squash Tostadas

While Blue Apron led to the idea of crafting some veggie tostadas for the blog, none that I ever got from the subscription meal service tasted as good or fully realized as these did. Taken altogether, these were a symphony of flavors and textures that worked incredibly well with one another. First came the crackling crunch of the corn tortilla which soon contrasted with the creamy beans and sweet squash. The salsa and sour cream next added spiciness and tang to the party while the cotija brought the salt, the radish a crisp and sharp bite, and the cilantro the boost of freshness that was started with by the avocado salsa. I wonder if this same time next year I'll be back saying once again that I have failed to cancel Blue Apron, which served a purpose for time to amp up my own creativity and desire to cook more balanced and veggie-focused meals, but really is no longer needed, even though it's literally been years now that I have failed to actually email them to ask them stop my subscription for good.

 

Butternut Squash Tostadas

A lot of components combine into one delicious whole in these sweet, creamy, tangy, fresh, and lightly spicy butternut squash tostadas.

  • Prep Time:
  • 1 Hour
  • Inactive Time:
  • 15 Minutes
  • Cook Time:
  • 20 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 1 Hour 35 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 12 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Black Beans
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped white onion
  • 1 tablespoon finely minced garlic (about 3 medium cloves)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 3 cups black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1/2 cup water, plus more as needed
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • Fresh ground black pepper, to taste
  • For the Salsa
  • 2 Anaheim and Hatch chiles
  • 1/2 pound tomatillos, husked and halved
  • 1 avocado, peeled, pitted, and roughly diced
  • 2 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 1/2 cup roughly chopped cilantro leaves
  • 1 teaspoon freshly squeezed lime juice
  • 1/4 cup water
  • Kosher salt, to taste
  • For the Tostadas
  • 2 to 3 cups canola oil
  • 24 street taco-size corn tortillas
  • For the Butternut Squash
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dark brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 medium butternut squash, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1/2-inch thick rounds or wedges
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1/3 cup sour cream
  • 1/3 cup cotija cheese, finely grated
  • 1/3 cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
  • 4 radishes, thinly slices

Procedure

  1. To make the beans: Melt butter in a medium saucepan set over medium heat. When foaming subsides, add in onions and garlic and cook, stirring occasionally, until onions have softened, but have not browned, about 5 minutes. Add cumin and stir until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in beans and cook until warmed, about 2 minutes. Remove from heat and, using a fork or potato masher, mash bean to desired consistency, thinning with water as necessary. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  2. To make the salsa: Preheat broiler. Roast chiles over an open flame on a gas stove or grill until skins are completely charred. Place in a bowl, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand until cooled, 5-10 minutes. Peel off charred skins; remove stems and seed poblanos. Place tomatillos, cut sides down, on a foil-lined rimmed baking sheet. Transfer to broiler and cook until tomatillo skins have charred and flesh has softened completely. Transfer tomatillos to the jar of a blender along with chiles, avocado, garlic, cilantro, lime juice, and water. Puree until smooth. Season with salt to taste. Transfer salsa to a squeeze bottle or airtight container. Set aside.
  3. To make the tostadas: Heat oil in a 12-inch cast iron skillet, dutch oven, or wok over medium-high heat until it registers 375°F. Adjust flame to maintain temperature. Working in batches, add tortillas and fry until edges just start to brown. Flip tortillas over and continue to cook until crisp and light golden brown. Transfer tostadas to a paper towel lined tray, sprinkle with salt to taste, and let sit for 2 to 3 minutes to drain. Repeat with remaining tortillas. Set aside.
  4. To make the squash: In a small bowl, mix together chili powder, cumin, brown sugar, and salt. Place squash slices in a large bowl and add in oil and seasoning mixture. Toss to evenly coat squash in oil and seasoning. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place butternut squash rounds on cool side of grill, cover, and cook until tender throughout, 20 to 30 minutes. Transfer butternut squash to a cutting board and cut into a medium dice.
  5. To assemble the tostadas: Spread a layer of black beans on each tostada round. Top each with pieces of squash followed by a squeeze of the avocado salsa and sour cream. Sprinkle on cotija cheese and cilantro. Place a few radish slices on each tostada and serve immediately.

barbecue,bbq,grilling,foodblogs,foodblog,nyc,new york city,meatwave,Grilling,Recipe,Vegetarian,Mexican

 

By: Joshua Bousel
Title: Butternut Squash Tostadas
Sourced From: meatwave.com/blog/grilled-butternut-squash-tostadas-recipe
Published Date: 02/06/20

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Grilling Recipes

Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs

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The single best barbecue experience I had in 2019 was at Blood Bros. BBQ in Houston. That's saying a lot given that I also had my first taste of many other establishments churning out top tier smoked meats—Truth BBQ, B's Cracklin' BBQ, Grady's Barbecue, Sam Jones BBQ, and Buxton Hall. What was so exhilarating about Blood Bros. to me was not just the quality, and every meat I tried was stellar, but the effortless melding of barbecue with other cultural influences. In general, this is what makes eating in Houston more exciting than most places, the melting pot of cultural inputs ends up outputting food in a manner that doesn't feel forced—it's not “Fusion” food, it's just their food. A group of Vietnamese friends started up Blood Bros., and the menu feels like an organic a sampling of everything they grew up eating in Houston that resonated with them. It's mostly Asian, but not strictly so, and sometimes Vietnamese, and other times not, like Thai sticky peanut butter ribs, which was one of the standout meats for me. During this quarantine period I was having very fond memories of those ribs and decided to make my own recipe for them as an ode to Blood Bros.

I have no idea what the Blood Bros. recipe is for these, I just knew that they blended Thai cuisine and American barbecue really well and didn't hold back on the spicy. So I used my personal knowledge of each cuisine to devise a recipe I thought would do the inspiration justice. It started with some homemade red curry paste, and I highly recommend making this stuff at home in a mortar and pestle for maximum flavor. I used the curry paste as the base of a wet rub, to which I added fish sauce, brown sugar, salt, and black pepper.

I then slathered the sauce all over a rack of St, Louis cut spare ribs. They definitely looked a lot different than the dry rubbed ribs I'm used to making, but I figured different is the right development path for this recipe.

Next I placed the ribs in the smoker that I had running at 225°F. I used a couple fist-sized chucks of apple wood to impart a light smokiness. I chose a more mellow wood because I thought without the heavy spice layer of normal barbecue, heartier woods could end up tasting a little too overpowering in this scenario.

Once the ribs were going, I went back inside and started on the sauce, which is the heart of the flavor of this recipe. I looked at my normal barbecue sauce recipe and started subbing out ingredients and changing quantities in a way that would make it taste like a melding of American barbecue sauce with Thai flavors. This began by swapping onions for shallots, which I sautéed and then added in a larger the usual amount of garlic along with ginger and Thai bird's eye chilies.

Then I whisked in the foundational ketchup with a fair amount of creamy peanut butter, providing the ribs namesake flavor and sticky character. To that I added rice vinegar, brown sugar, soy sauce, red curry paste, fish sauce, and lime juice. After cooking for bit to meld the flavors and thicken slightly, I seasoned the sauce with salt and pepper but something felt like it was missing. I was racking my brain on what to add to give the boost of flavor I thought was absent, and finally I had an idea—I added in a squeeze of tamarind concentrate and that ended up providing the perfect sour note and little extra savoriness to make the sauce feel complete.

With the usual barbecue ribs, the exterior starts to darken and turn overly brown or black after a few hours of smoking, which is why I spritz the ribs with a liquid—normally apple juice—when they hit a good mahogany color to avoid overcooking the rub. I had originally planned on doing that here, using rice vinegar to spray them down, but the ribs didn't turn a deep red until right at the end of cooking, so it wasn't needed at all.

At the same time they started to look beautiful, they were also almost done, which I tested by lifting one end of the rack with a pair of tongs and judging how they bent. So with just 30 minutes or so of smoking time left, I applied the sauce generously, wanting that thick and sticky sauce coating I experienced at Blood Bros.

And after the last stint in the smoker, they were done and looked good, but they were about to get a whole lot prettier thanks to a garnishing of cilantro, peanuts, and pepper slices.

By now my mouth was watering and my anticipation for a taste of these ribs had grown even more, making the obligatory photo shoot before eating feel even longer than it normally does. Upon that first bite, I was brought back to my memories of how excited I felt eating each dish at Blood Bros. While the ribs tasted familiar, they were not an exact copycat recipe, which in a way I preferred because they were more representative of my experience and skills, even if the original concept was not my own. They still had the seamless blend of cuisines going on for them, with the smoked pork and complex, layered sauce making them solidly American barbecue, but the overall flavors more reminiscent of Thai cuisine with a strong heat backed up by acidity and complimentary herbal notes. The peanut butter in the sauce also pushed them further in the Thai direction while also delivering the “sticky” promise of the recipe title. I can't wait to go back to Blood Bros. and try even more things, but the only problem is that there's so much great and utterly unique food in Houston that returning to the same place twice is not something I do often with all there is to try there that really can't be had, or at least doesn't feel the same, anywhere else.
Published on Thu May 7, 2020 by Joshua Bousel

Print Recipe
Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs Yield 4 servings Prep 30 Minutes Cook 6 Hours Total 6 Hours 30 Minutes Ingredients For the Sauce 1/2 cup finely minced shallots 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh garlic 1 tablespoon finely minced fresh ginger 3 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced 1 cup ketchup 1/3 cup creamy peanut butter 1/3 cup rice vinegar 1/3 cup palm or light brown sugar 1/4 cup soy sauce 1 tablespoon Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lime juice 1/2 teaspoon tamarind concentrate Kosher salt Freshly ground black pepper   For the Ribs 3 tablespoons palm or light brown sugar 2 tablespoons Thai red curry paste 1 tablespoon fish sauce 1 tablespoon Kosher salt 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 2 racks St. Louis-cut spare ribs 2 fist-sized chunks of light smoking wood, such as apple or cherry   For the Sauce 1/3 cup Roughly chopped roasted peanuts 3 tablespoons roughly chopped cilantro 4 Thai bird's eye chilies, thinly sliced Procedure To make the sauce: Heat oil in a medium saucepan over medium-high heat until shimmering. Add in shallots and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened, but not browned, about 5 minutes. Stir in garlic and ginger and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Stir in ketchup, peanut butter, vinegar, sugar, soy sauce, curry paste, fish sauce, lime juice, and tamarind concentrate. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until sauce thickens slightly, 5-10 minutes. Remove from heat and season with salt and pepper to taste. Transfer sauce to an airtight container and store in refrigerator until ready to use. To make the ribs: In a small bowl, mix together sugar, curry paste, fish sauce, salt, and pepper. Remove membrane from back of each rack of ribs and trim meat of excess fat. Spread seasoning mixture all over each rack of ribs. ire up a smoker or grill to 225°F, adding chunks of smoking wood when at temperature. When the wood is ignited and produces smoke, place the ribs in smoker or grill, meaty side up, and smoke until the ribs bend slightly when lifted from one end, 5-6 hours. During the last 30 minutes of cooking, brush top of each rack with sauce. Remove ribs from smoker and garnish with peanuts, cilantro, and chili slices. Slice ribs between bones and serve immediately.
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By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Thai-influenced Sticky Peanut Butter Ribs
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/thai-influenced-sticky-peanut-butter-ribs-recipe
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad

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Who needs sous vide when you get results like this with the reverse sear method? I smoked (cherry wood) this bone in ribeye steak low and slow over indirect charcoal heat until reaching an internal temperature of 110f when we then cranked the heat for a direct sear over the live fire. Once the crust was perfect on our ribeye we let it rest for 10min before slicing and serving.  Used Fogo black for the rub.

Here is how it came out, and a link to the video for more details, process etc. 

If you'd like to see the video: https://youtu.be/oXF7pVm_pOI

Beef

By: unoriginalusername
Title: Reverse seared bone in ribeye for an awesome steak salad
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1224011/reverse-seared-bone-in-ribeye-for-an-awesome-steak-salad
Published Date: 05/07/20

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Grilling Recipes

10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master

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If you’re new to grilling and/or barbecuing, it can be difficult to know how to get started. Perhaps you’ve bought a book, such as Steven’s iconic How to Grill, or consulted a friend or family member who seems to know what they’re doing. Maybe you’ve haunted chat rooms or other social media groups, hoping to pick up a few pointers, only to become confused by terms like “reverse-sear” and the “3-2-1 method.”

But the easiest way to acquire this old-as-time skill is to just do it. Like anything worth mastering, it takes some practice. You’ll need to build up experience managing time and temperature, two variables that can really mess up a grill session.

To help you develop some traction during this, National Barbecue Month, we’ve selected ten of our favorite dishes that will acquaint you with the basics—direct versus indirect grilling, for example—but encourage you to expand your comfort zone. And if you have any questions, any at all, feel free to contact us for a personal response in the comments below or on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram. We’re always happy to help.

10 Recipes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
1. The Great American Burger

Burgers are often the first thing people crave when the first warm days of spring or early summer arrive. Nothing fancy here. Just old-fashioned goodness—a perfectly cooked burger oozing flavor and juice, dressed modestly with traditional accompaniments.

Get the Recipe »

 

2. Chicken Wings

Can’t get to Buffalo or your favorite wing joint? These Buffa-Que Wings soak for several hours in a spicy marinade before being smoke roasted to crisp-skinned perfection.

Get the Recipe »

 

3. First-Timer’s Ribs

This recipe is a blueprint for rib perfection, even if it’s your first experience barbecuing these meaty bones. If you’re cooking for more than three or four people, invest in a Best of Barbecue Rib Rack. It holds four racks of ribs upright in the space that normally accommodates one.

Get the Recipe »

 

4. NOLA Smoked Shrimp

Warning: Boiled shrimp will lose its allure once you’ve added smoked shrimp to your repertoire.

Get the Recipe »

 

5. Cattle Drive Steaks

We get it: Pricy Porterhouses and T-bones can make or break your reputation as a live fire cook. We have two bits of advice: Invest in an accurate instant-read thermometer (insert the probe through the side); and never desert your post. This steak gets a flavorful coffee-based rub before hitting the grill. But your favorite rub—like Montreal steak rub or even coarse salt and pepper—can be used, too.

Get the Recipe »

 

6. North Carolina Pulled Pork

This pulled pork with the alliteratively named Pig Picker Pucker Sauce takes its cues from Lexington, North Carolina. Pulled pork is hard to mess up as long as you’re patient and pull it while it’s still very hot to the touch. Meat claws and lined food-safe gloves make the job much easier.

Get the Recipe »

 

7. Basic Beer Can Chicken

Moist, succulent, and flavorful. And did we mention crisp skin? For more on Beer Can Chicken, read on.

Get the Recipe »

 

8. Planked Salmon with Maple Mustard Glaze

Indigenous people of the American Northwest were among the first to roast salmon over cedar, a cooking method that deserves its phoenix-like rise from history’s ashes. This method also avoids the problem of the fish sticking to the grill grate.

Get the Recipe »

 

9. Fireman’s Corn
Husked, grilled sweet corn is a revelation. You’ll never boil it again.

Get the Recipe »

 

10. Grilled Pineapple with Mezcal Whipped Cream

This incredibly easy dessert makes a fine finish to a grilled and/or barbecued meal. Fresh slices of pineapple are dredged in spiced sugar, carmelized on the grill, and served with whipped cream laced with mezcal, a smoky cousin of tequila. (Feel free to substitute tequila or rum.)

Get the Recipe »

 

Do you have any beginner barbecue questions? Share them with us on Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, or Instagram!

The post 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master appeared first on Barbecuebible.com.

Beef,Chicken,Homepage Feature,Hot Stuff,Pork,Recipes,Ribs,Seafood,burger,recipes,ribs,steak

By: Cialina TH
Title: 10 Dishes Every Beginner Barbecuer Should Master
Sourced From: barbecuebible.com/2020/05/01/10-beginner-barbecue-recipes/
Published Date: 05/01/20

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