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Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

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This post was originally published on this site

Thu Mar 1, 2018

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

I've always been an all things parm lover, but then again, who isn't? Bread and fried something, top it with marinara and cheese, and cook until hot and melty…what's not to love? My lifelong go-to has been chicken parm (aka: chicky chicky parm parm) but I've been drawn more and more to eggplant parm in recent years. The reasons being are that eggplant makes a gut busting dish just slightly lighter, the somewhat flavorless fruit lets the sauce and cheese shine even more, and that creamy eggplant texture is really just fantastic. So when I had an Italian-themed Meatwave happening and was looking for dishes that could easily feed a crowd, eggplant parm was top of mind, and the results didn't disappoint.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

One thing that has happened over my career as a recipe developer is that I can no longer remember the last time I've bought a jarred marinara sauce. Marinara is such an easy thing to put together and tastes so much better when fresh, that I've left convenience behind completely and always opt to make it from scratch, which involves a little time, but very little effort.

I started off my marinara by slowly heating oil along with garlic and red pepper flakes, which ensured neither ingredient burnt and the oil got infused with a bit of sharp and spicy flavor. Then I added some tomato paste and oregano and cooked them until the paste was heated through and the entire thing was fragrant.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

Next came the tomatoes. I prefer going with whole canned tomatoes so I can puree them to my desired consistency, but if I want even less work, I just buy crushed tomatoes instead. Then it was just a matter of letting the sauce simmer until it was slightly thickened and the flavor had intensified. I added in a quartered onion and a basil sprig for extra flavor during simmering, then removed both and tossed in some chopped basil right before I adjusted the final seasoning with salt and pepper to taste. From start to finish the sauce took about 25 minutes to complete, and most of that time was spent prepping other parts of a recipe.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

For this particular recipe, I was able to do two other steps while making the marinara. The first was toasting some breadcrumbs. There's no getting around the fact that part of what makes parms so tasty is the fried breading, and in a grilled application, that major selling point of parms was destined to get lost. In an attempt to not miss out on it completely, I made my own crispy breadcrumbs by pulsing white bread together with butter in a food processor and then toasting the bread until dried and crunchy in a warm oven. I could then use this in the end to bring at least a little bread component back to the final dish.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

The other thing I completed while the sauce was simmering was prepping the eggplant. I usually like my eggplant slices thin, which is really just a way to increase the fried, crispy portion of the dish, but since that wasn't in play here, I opted for larger, 1/2-inch slices of eggplant to ensure they had a heartiness to them in the final assembly.

You'll see a lot of recipes calling to salt the eggplant before cooking, which draws moisture of out the eggplant, letting it get cooked to an ideal creamy, but not mushy texture, more efficiently. In past testing though, I've learned that the high heat of the grill is more than sufficient at extruding moisture so quickly that there's really no benefit to salting and resting the eggplant first. So once I had brushed all my slices with oil and seasoned them to my taste, I took them straight out to the freshly lite grill.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

There's two advantages of the grill in the recipe—cooking a lot of eggplant really fast all at once, and getting a nice smoky, charred flavor to make this preparation pretty unique. If you've made eggplant parm before, I'm sure you're familiar with the time and mess frying requires and recognize that cooking everything at once with ease is no small detail. The fact that I was able to get all slices on the grill together made making eggplant parm a whole lot faster and easier.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

The grill flavor is also important here—the delicate character of the eggplant really picks up a nice mellow smokiness on the grill and makes up a little for what's lost with frying (well maybe not makes up for, but provides an acceptable alternative). Even when the eggplant cooks quickly—like they did here with only needing about 3 minutes per side—they gain enough flavor to make them taste distinctly grilled.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

As each eggplant piece developed a look and texture as the slice above, I pulled them off the grill. I wanted the eggplant to be soft, but also still firm enough that it didn't turn to mush when handled. I also was looking for a nice browned and slightly charred exterior to ensure it had maximum flavor without venturing into burnt territory.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

Once all the eggplant was done, I assembled the parm by first spreading a layer of sauce along the bottom of a baking dish. I then placed a single layer of eggplant to fill up the dish and topped each slice with sauce and mozzarella.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

Next I topped each piece of eggplant with another slice and repeated the sauce and cheese applications, but this time also added parmesan and the toasted breadcrumbs. I then put the dish under the broiler until the cheese was melted and browned. Alternatively, you could use the existing heat from the coals and cook this over an indirect fire on the grill, but you won't get that browned cheese that I think makes the difference between a good and truly excellent parm.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

And just look at how that final dish came out—not bad for a grilled eggplant parm, right? For me personally, it got my mouth watering just as much as the usual fried version, and the flavor certainly delivered too. Yes, there was some textural component missing from not frying the eggplant, but what it lacked was made up for by the gain in grilled flavor, which made this method stand out as its own unique thing. The eggplant was ideally soft and creamy, but with some bits of semi-crisp char that added a lot to the already delicious melding of marinara and melted cheese. The breadcrumbs were also nice touch, and while they didn't make up for the lack of frying, they added their own stamp that would have been sorely missed if omitted. All in all, I was quite happy with this eggplant parm, and I'm sure you would be too if you're willing to ditch the fryer and take up the grill instead.

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan

Ditching the fryer and using the grill makes for one unique and tasty eggplant parm.

  • Prep Time:
  • 1 Hour 10 Minutes
  • Cook Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 1 Hour 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Sauce
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic (about 3 medium cloves)
  • 1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 2 28oz cans whole peeled tomatoes
  • 1 small yellow onion, quartered
  • 1 large sprig basil, plus 3 tablespoons finely chopped basil
  • Kosher salt
  • Freshly ground pepper
  •  
  • For the Breadcrumbs
  • 6 slices white bread
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted
  •  
  • 2 large globe eggplants, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 1/3 cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • 8oz low-moisture mozzarella, grated
  • 3oz parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • 3 tablespoons roughly chopped basil

Procedure

  1. To make the sauce: Place oil, garlic, and red pepper flakes in a large pot or dutch oven over medium-low heat; cook until oil begins to bubble around garlic. Increase heat to medium-high, add in tomato paste and oregano and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute. Add in tomatoes and blend to desired consistency with an immersion blender. Add in onion and basil sprig and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low and simmer for 20 minutes. Remove from heat and discard onion quarters and basil sprig. Add in chopped basil and season with salt and pepper to taste. Set aside.
  2. To make the breadcrumbs: Heat oven to 250°F. Place bread in the workbowl of a food processor fitted with a steel blade. Pulse until bread is finely chopped. With motor running, drizzle in melted butter through the feed tube. Transfer breadcrumbs to a baking sheet and shake to spread breadcrumbs into an even layer. Place baking sheet in oven and cook until bread is dried and crisp, about 20 minutes. Remove from oven and set aside.
  3. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Brush eggplant slices with oil and season with salt and pepper. Grill eggplant slices until browned on both sides, 2-3 minutes per side. Transfer to a large tray or cutting board.
  4. Set oven to broil. Spread an even layer of sauce along the bottom of a large baking dish. Place a single layer of eggplant slices in dish and top each slice with a heaping tablespoon of sauce. Divided roughly half of the mozzarella between each eggplant slice. Top each slice with another piece of eggplant followed by additional sauce, mozzarella, parmesan, and breadcrumbs. Place baking dish under broiler and cook until cheese has melted and browned. Remove from oven and let rest for up to five minutes. Sprinkle with fresh basil and serve immediately.
READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Grilled Eggplant Parmesan was originally posted at http://www.meatwave.com/blog/grilled-eggplant-parmesan-recipe by Joshua Bousel

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Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

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This post was originally published on this site

Thu Dec 21, 2017

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

Longtime readers already know this, but ham is my jam. I'm an equal opportunity ham lover, but when we get down to it, it's sweet city ham with a sugary glaze that really has my heart. For the past few years I've begun serving ham alongside turkey at my family Thanksgivings even though a bird alone is more than enough food for my clan. Thinking of the extra work and cost, I almost didn't make a ham this year, then, just a couple weeks away from the big day, I had a gnawing craving that forced me into an action that ended with a seven pound pig rump being sent to me via the mail. Glad that happened because this year I tried out a new glaze featuring Dr. Pepper as the base, and I can say I think I've finally found my full ham master recipe.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

While my ham selection and cooking method has remained consistent, I have been changing up my glaze constantly, never being fully satisfied with the ones I had come up. This year I had a new thought—why not take a cue from the sweet Filipino pork skewers I make every now and again and use soda to start things off on the right foot with a dark and sweet base that already brings a lot of flavor.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

I opted for Dr. Pepper, although Cherry Coke was also up there as a top choice, and combined it with fresh orange juice, honey, brown sugar, Dijon, cinnamon, and black pepper. I let this mixture slowly boil down until it was thick and syrupy, just like a good glaze should be.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

The rest of this post is going to be a blanket repeat of past ham recipes I've done, because years ago I found a cooking method for city hams in Cook's Illustrated that has proven to be perfect and fool proof. I use the term “cooking” lightly because city hams are almost always precooked, so it's really a reheating method that keeps the ham as juicy as can be—and don't underestimate how tricky that is. Of course, starting with a quality product makes a big difference, and I've become very fond of the hams Burger's Smokehouse puts out.

The main idea behind the method is to slowly bring the ham up to temperature, and the less time it spends in a dry heat environment, the better. That's why this process doesn't actually start in the oven, but rather by soaking the ham, in its packaging, in hot water. This takes the refrigerator chill away and results in far less cooking time.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

The next aid comes in the form of an oven bag. Prior to cooking hams, I had never heard of, or used, an oven bag before. Its use here is to create a humid cooking environment, lessening evaporation and speeding cooking. One hundred percent humidity wasn't what I after though, so some small slits were cut at the top to allow a little exhaust.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

Then into the smoker the ham went. Since it was already cooked and in a bag, using the smoker as a way to impart smoke was not a goal, or even achievable, but what I did want was a slow and steady heat, and what's better for low and slow cooking than a smoker? I used my trusty CyberQ Cloud to keep the temperature a fairly constant 225°F and let the ham creep up to an internal temperature of 100°F.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

Once that happened, I removed the oven bag from the ham and dumped the water out of the water pan in the smoker to up the heat. I applied my beautifully thick and glossy glaze, covered, and cooked until the glaze had baked down and the ham's temperature was no more than 120°F. You can also keep the heat low here, but the glaze thickens up a bit better and faster at a higher heat, which is why I like to try to get the smoker temp up around 325°F for this final step.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

Then it was serving time, and while the ham was essentially the same one I've served for the past couple years, this one looked better in my eyes for some reason. I think the dark color of the glaze helped, plus that fact that it baked down into a thick, sugary crust. The meat was as juicy and sweet as I could hope for, and what I've come to expect using this reheating method many times now. It was that glaze though that really turned this ham up a notch—what gave it better looks also provided even better flavor. With only the very edges available to make an impact, the glaze needed to do a lot of work in minimal space, and this one delivered big on the ideal sweetness, but with a complexity, thanks to the Dr. Pepper and little portions of cinnamon and mustard, that has been unmatched in my experience to date. So now that I think I finally have my gold standard glaze recipe, you likely won't be seeing another holiday ham recipe from me for a while as I put this one on repeat, but hopefully you can use this to make your holiday centerpiece meat as great as it can be.

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham

Dr. Pepper serves as the base of this sweet and complex glaze that imparts big flavor on a holiday ham.

  • Prep Time:
  • 20 Minutes
  • Inactive Time:
  • 1 Hour 30 Minutes
  • Cook Time:
  • 1 Hour 30 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 3 Hours 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 12 to 16 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Glaze
  • 1 cup Dr. Pepper
  • 1/2 cup freshly squeezed orange juice
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/2 cup packed brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  •  
  • 1 spiral sliced city ham, shank end, 6 to 8 pounds
  • 1 large oven bag

Procedure

  1. To make the glaze: Whisk together Dr Pepper, orange juice, honey, brown sugar, mustard, pepper, and cinnamon in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium-high heat, reduce to a simmer, and cook, stirring occasionally, until thickened to a syrupy consistency, 20 to 30 minutes. Remove from heat and set aside.
  2. Place ham, in original plastic packaging, in a large container and cover with hot tap water. Let sit for 45 minutes. Drain water, recover with hot tap water, and let sit for an additional 45 minutes. Drain water and remove ham from packaging. Place ham in an oven bag and tie close with bag fitting snugly around ham. Trim excess plastic from top of bag and cut 4 slits in bag around the top of ham with a paring knife. Place ham on a baking sheet, cut side down.
  3. Fire up smoker or grill to 225°F. Place ham in smoker, cover, and cook until an instant read thermometer registers 100°F when inserted into thickest part of ham, 1 to 1 1/2 hours.
  4. Unwrap ham and brush liberally with glaze. Cover and continue to cook for 15 minutes. Brush ham with glaze a second time, cover, and continue to cook until an instant read thermometer registers 120°F when inserted into thickest portion of ham, about 15 minutes more. Remove ham from smoker, let rest for 15 minutes, then serve.
READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Dr. Pepper Glazed Ham was originally posted at http://www.meatwave.com/blog/dr.-pepper-glazed-city-ham-recipe by Joshua Bousel

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Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

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This post was originally published on this site

Thu Dec 14, 2017

Schwenkbraten

I'm no master of German cuisine, and when I decided to host an Oktoberfest cookout of sorts, my first, and only, recipes I thought of were all of the wurst variety. I felt like I both wanted to cook and offer more than sausages to my guest, so did some research on other ubiquitous German grilled meats and came across schwenkbraten—marinated and grilled pork neck steaks. It seemed like schwenkbraten consisted of three things, all dubbed schwenker—the unique suspended swinging grill over a live fire for cooking, the person actually doing the grilling (or most correctly, the swinging), and the meat itself. Seeing as I had two out of three and, having never had schwenkbraten before, I was freed a bit of the confines of authenticity, it seemed like a decent choice to help fill out the menu with at least one thing that fit the theme was not an encased meat.

Schwenkbraten

To start this recipe off, I attempted to get some true pork neck steaks, and while pork neck wasn't all that difficult to find, procuring it in a steak fashion, and not cut into little pieces, was. So I did what I figured was the next best, and closet thing. I trimmed off half-inch thick steaks from a pork shoulder I was also using to make sausages. Seeing as the shoulder is pretty close to the neck and the steaks had a similar amount of fat and connective tissue, I felt good that this was the right direction.

Schwenkbraten

The flavoring of the marinade seemed a little bit like a cook's choice. I read recipes and watched some German Youtube video for research and what went into the sauce was wide and varied. Most everyone had oil (of course), garlic, juniper berries, and mustard. So I began there added in dried thyme and oregano for the herbal component that looked common, as well as paprika and cayenne for a touch of spice and heat.

Schwenkbraten

Onions also seemed a must, so I tossed one sliced onion into the marinade and coated it, along with the pork, in the liquid. My plan later was to make use of those onions by grilling them and using them as a topping for the sandwiches.

Schwenkbraten

Another hallmark of schwenkbraten recipes was a long marinade time. Seeing as there wasn't a whole lot in the marinade that would actually react with the meat to make significant changes over time, I question if that is really a necessity, scientifically speaking. I did marinate mine almost 24 hours since I prepared it the afternoon before the event, but I would imagine less time wouldn't produce dramatically different results. For good measure though, I left he ideal timing from overnight to two days in the final recipe.

Schwenkbraten

My major area of concern in making these was how they would turn out cooked over high heat. Pork shoulder, and neck, is full of fat and connective tissue that is chewy and tough when cooked quickly, but renders when cooked low and slow. If using a traditional schwenker, I assume the grilling is a bit slower than on a grill since the coals are further from the grill grate, but it's still hot and fast cooking and not what I was used to for shoulder meat.

Schwenkbraten

I must say though, they did grill up to be really beautiful. In just a few minutes per side, the thin steaks developed a nice sear with attractive browning and were also just cooked through, without being over done—so the hot fire did its job in this respect.

Schwenkbraten

Once the steaks were done and I had room on the grill again, I put a cast iron skillet over the coals and let it preheat for a few minutes. I then took the onions from the marinade and cooked them in the hot skillet until they were crisp-tender, which took about five minutes.

Schwenkbraten

And now for what's become a standard PSA of mine—if you're making sandwiches on the grill, use that massive space and heat source to grill your bread! That bread in this scenario were Kaiser rolls, which I toasted over direct heat until lightly browned, warmed through, and a bit crusty.

Schwenkbraten

I then turned my three grilled elements into sandwiches by topping each bun with a pork steak or two and a portion of the onions. Whether they tasted good was still a question, but they certainly looked great and very meat forward, which is how I imagine a lot of German dishes are.

Schwenkbraten

And the flavor was pretty great too. The marinade was powerful and lent a nice pungent and herbal profile to the meat and onions, along with a slight hit of heat. The pork itself was well cooked, but as I expected, there was a bit more chew to it than I'm used to. That's not to say that's a bad thing—there was no bit of this sandwich that was inedible—it was just different, and what I assume is all part of the experience. My main point of contention was the sandwiches felt a tad dry when taken altogether, but that's something a little spread of mustard or mayo could easily fix, and I would add that in if I were making these again. All-in-all though, they provided the non-wurst dish I was looking for and introduced me to something new that I now must seek out and try to see what real deal schwenkbraten is all about.

Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

A long stint in a herbed and spiced mustard marinade gives these German pork steak sandwiches an immense flavor.

  • Prep Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Inactive Time:
  • 4 Hours
  • Cook Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 4 Hours 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons spicy mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 4 juniper berries, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2lbs pork neck or shoulder steaks, cut 1/2-inch thick
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 8 Kaiser rolls

Procedure

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil, mustard, salt, garlic, paprika, juniper berries, thyme, oregano, and cayenne pepper. Add in onion and steak and toss to thoroughly coat. Transfer to a large Ziploc bag, seal, removing as much air as possible, and place in refrigerator overnight to two days.
  2. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place porks steaks on grill and cook until browned and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a cutting board or platter.
  3. Place a cast iron skillet on grill and let preheat for 2 to 3 minutes. Place onions in skillet and cook until slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Remove skillet from grill and set aside. Place rolls on grill, cut side down, and cook until warmed through and lightly toasted, about 1 minute.
  4. Transfer buns to serving platter or plates, top each bottom half with pork steaks and onions. Serve immediately.
READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Schwenkbraten Sandwiches was originally posted at http://www.meatwave.com/blog/schwenkbraten-grilled-german-pork-chop-sandwiches by Joshua Bousel

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Veggie Burger Patty Melts

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This post was originally published on this site

Thu Dec 7, 2017

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

I have to admit, my old thought process on vegetarians attending the Meatwave was that knew what they were coming to, so why cook anything specifically catered to them. Sometimes non-meat items where on the menu, sometimes not, and I always had veggie burgers and buns on hand to at least offer something. That was literally the least I could do, and it was non-empathic and not fair. Nowadays, I try to balance my menus between meaty and non-meaty items so there's something for everyone, and in scenarios where meat-free is a challenge—like at a German-themed cookout from this past summer—I still can't bring myself to default solely to frozen veggie burgers alone anymore. Everyone deserves more than that, even if it's a small, incremental step, like these veggie burger patty melts.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

These patty melts are essentially just grilled veggie burgers in a slightly different form, but the fact that it's not the same thing over again I think shows some extra thought went into the decision and preparation to serve them. They consist of the standard patty, cheese, and bread (swapping rye for burger buns) combo, but the one extra step of caramelizing onions is where these patty melts really show their love, in my opinion.

I've tried so many shortcuts to get great caramelized onions, but nothing can compare to slowly cooking the onions until they begin to leave behind well browned fond on the pan, and then following a process of deglazing and re-browning until the onions are soft and dark brown. With just a couple onions, as this recipe calls for, expect this to take a good 20 to 30 minutes, but the end results are totally worth the time put in.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

I have making homemade veggie burger patties on my to-do list, but for now I'm still relying on store-bought. I kind of like that this recipe used these common patties though because it just goes to show that doing things a little different can make such a standard item feel new and fresh. Working with these frozen patties, my goal on the grill was merely to make sure they were well warmed through and developed a slight char, without drying them out.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

Once the burgers were done, I removed them from the grill and used the now empty space to toast the bread. Patty melts are traditionally made with rye, which I used here and grilled until golden brown after buttering one side of each slice.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

Next I assembled the patty melts by stacking up a veggie burger, slice of Swiss, and a hearty portion of the caramelized onions on each slice of bread.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

I then placed the sandwiches on the cool side of a two-zone fire, covered, and let them cook until the cheese melted. Depending on how thick your cheese is and how hot your grill is at this point, it can take anyway from two to four minutes for this to happen.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

Now look at this end result and tell me, whether you're a meat eater or not, that doesn't look delicious? For vegetarians accustomed to being afterthoughts at cookouts, it only took minimal extra work and a couple different ingredients to transform what I think was a mere expectation into something that felt like care and thought went into it. The flavor also brought something new, with that common veggie patty getting a big boost from the sweet and soft onions paired with the light and creamy Swiss and crusty and buttery rye. I don't think I could ever go back to the days of not considering my vegetarian friends on more equal footing with the meat eaters, especially knowing that with a dish like these patty melts, a little effort can go a long way.

Veggie Burger Patty Melts

These veggie burger patty melts breath new life into the go-to item for most non-meat eaters at cookouts.

  • Prep Time:
  • 30 Minutes
  • Cook Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 40 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 6 servings

Ingredients

  • For the Onions
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 large yellow onions, thinly sliced
  • Kosher salt
  •  
  • For the Sandwiches
  • 6 veggie burgers
  • 12 slices rye bread
  • 3 tablespoons butter
  • 6 slices Swiss cheese

Procedure

  1. To make the onions: Melt butter in a large heavy-bottomed stainless steel or enameled cast iron dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook, stirring occasionally, until softened and bottom of saucepan is coated in a pale brown fond, about 15 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons water and deglaze pan by scraping with a wood spoon. Continue to cook, stirring occasionally, until another layer of fond has built up again, 3-5 minutes. Add 2 tablespoons water and deglaze. Repeat process until onions are completely softened and a deep, dark brown, about 15 minutes more. Season onions to taste with salt. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.
  2. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and arrange the coals on one side of the charcoal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place veggie burgers on hot side of grill and cook, flipping occasionally, until slightly charred and warmed through. Transfer burgers to a cutting board or tray.
  3. Working in two or three batches as necessary, butter one side of each slice of bread and place on hot side of grill, buttered side down, and cook until bread is toasty and lightly browned, about 1 minute. Transfer bread to cutting board or tray.
  4. Place one patty on top of a slice of bread, unbuttered side. Top each patty with a slice of swiss cheese, caramelized onions, and second slice of bread, buttered side up. Place sandwiches on cool side of grill, cover, and cook until cheese has completely melted, about 3 minutes. Transfer patty melts to a serving tray or plates and serve immediately.
READ LATER - DOWNLOAD THIS POST AS PDF >> CLICK HERE <<

Veggie Burger Patty Melts was originally posted at http://www.meatwave.com/blog/grilled-veggie-burger-patty-melts-recipe by Joshua Bousel

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