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Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

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Schwenkbraten

I'm no master of German cuisine, and when I decided to host an Oktoberfest cookout of sorts, my first, and only, recipes I thought of were all of the wurst variety. I felt like I both wanted to cook and offer more than sausages to my guest, so did some research on other ubiquitous German grilled meats and came across schwenkbraten—marinated and grilled pork neck steaks. It seemed like schwenkbraten consisted of three things, all dubbed schwenker—the unique suspended swinging grill over a live fire for cooking, the person actually doing the grilling (or most correctly, the swinging), and the meat itself. Seeing as I had two out of three and, having never had schwenkbraten before, I was freed a bit of the confines of authenticity, it seemed like a decent choice to help fill out the menu with at least one thing that fit the theme was not an encased meat.

Schwenkbraten

To start this recipe off, I attempted to get some true pork neck steaks, and while pork neck wasn't all that difficult to find, procuring it in a steak fashion, and not cut into little pieces, was. So I did what I figured was the next best, and closet thing. I trimmed off half-inch thick steaks from a pork shoulder I was also using to make sausages. Seeing as the shoulder is pretty close to the neck and the steaks had a similar amount of fat and connective tissue, I felt good that this was the right direction.

Schwenkbraten

The flavoring of the marinade seemed a little bit like a cook's choice. I read recipes and watched some German Youtube video for research and what went into the sauce was wide and varied. Most everyone had oil (of course), garlic, juniper berries, and mustard. So I began there added in dried thyme and oregano for the herbal component that looked common, as well as paprika and cayenne for a touch of spice and heat.

Schwenkbraten

Onions also seemed a must, so I tossed one sliced onion into the marinade and coated it, along with the pork, in the liquid. My plan later was to make use of those onions by grilling them and using them as a topping for the sandwiches.

Schwenkbraten

Another hallmark of schwenkbraten recipes was a long marinade time. Seeing as there wasn't a whole lot in the marinade that would actually react with the meat to make significant changes over time, I question if that is really a necessity, scientifically speaking. I did marinate mine almost 24 hours since I prepared it the afternoon before the event, but I would imagine less time wouldn't produce dramatically different results. For good measure though, I left he ideal timing from overnight to two days in the final recipe.

Schwenkbraten

My major area of concern in making these was how they would turn out cooked over high heat. Pork shoulder, and neck, is full of fat and connective tissue that is chewy and tough when cooked quickly, but renders when cooked low and slow. If using a traditional schwenker, I assume the grilling is a bit slower than on a grill since the coals are further from the grill grate, but it's still hot and fast cooking and not what I was used to for shoulder meat.

Schwenkbraten

I must say though, they did grill up to be really beautiful. In just a few minutes per side, the thin steaks developed a nice sear with attractive browning and were also just cooked through, without being over done—so the hot fire did its job in this respect.

Schwenkbraten

Once the steaks were done and I had room on the grill again, I put a cast iron skillet over the coals and let it preheat for a few minutes. I then took the onions from the marinade and cooked them in the hot skillet until they were crisp-tender, which took about five minutes.

Schwenkbraten

And now for what's become a standard PSA of mine—if you're making sandwiches on the grill, use that massive space and heat source to grill your bread! That bread in this scenario were Kaiser rolls, which I toasted over direct heat until lightly browned, warmed through, and a bit crusty.

Schwenkbraten

I then turned my three grilled elements into sandwiches by topping each bun with a pork steak or two and a portion of the onions. Whether they tasted good was still a question, but they certainly looked great and very meat forward, which is how I imagine a lot of German dishes are.

Schwenkbraten

And the flavor was pretty great too. The marinade was powerful and lent a nice pungent and herbal profile to the meat and onions, along with a slight hit of heat. The pork itself was well cooked, but as I expected, there was a bit more chew to it than I'm used to. That's not to say that's a bad thing—there was no bit of this sandwich that was inedible—it was just different, and what I assume is all part of the experience. My main point of contention was the sandwiches felt a tad dry when taken altogether, but that's something a little spread of mustard or mayo could easily fix, and I would add that in if I were making these again. All-in-all though, they provided the non-wurst dish I was looking for and introduced me to something new that I now must seek out and try to see what real deal schwenkbraten is all about.

Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

A long stint in a herbed and spiced mustard marinade gives these German pork steak sandwiches an immense flavor.

  • Prep Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Inactive Time:
  • 4 Hours
  • Cook Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 4 Hours 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons spicy mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 4 juniper berries, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2lbs pork neck or shoulder steaks, cut 1/2-inch thick
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 8 Kaiser rolls

Procedure

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil, mustard, salt, garlic, paprika, juniper berries, thyme, oregano, and cayenne pepper. Add in onion and steak and toss to thoroughly coat. Transfer to a large Ziploc bag, seal, removing as much air as possible, and place in refrigerator overnight to two days.
  2. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place porks steaks on grill and cook until browned and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a cutting board or platter.
  3. Place a cast iron skillet on grill and let preheat for 2 to 3 minutes. Place onions in skillet and cook until slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Remove skillet from grill and set aside. Place rolls on grill, cut side down, and cook until warmed through and lightly toasted, about 1 minute.
  4. Transfer buns to serving platter or plates, top each bottom half with pork steaks and onions. Serve immediately.
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Italian Steak Seasoning – How to Make Italian Steak Seasoning at Home

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Italian Steak Seasoning – How to Make Italian Steak Seasoning at Home

Grilled Italian steaks are not easy to find in the United States. The secret is to use lemon juice, extra virgin olive oil, garlic and seasoned salt to create a sauce that's rich, flavorful and bursting with flavor. Here's how to make them at home! Follow these easy steps and enjoy the ultimate taste of Italy! Listed below are some easy-to-make Italian steak recipes. If you haven't tried them yet, give them a try!

First, prep your ingredients. Prepare your cast-iron skillet for cooking. You'll need at least four minutes of heat. Then, add the oil and turn the garlic cloves. You'll need two tablespoons of oil to coat the pan. Add the steaks and garlic cloves to the skillet and cook for 2 minutes on each side. Then, use tongs to flip them over. Repeat this process once more to create a medium-rare steak. Serve your steaks with a side dish of broiled tomatoes.

To season your steaks, you need to chop up your herbs and place them in a mortar. Pound the herbs into a coarse paste and mix them with olive oil, balsamic vinegar, and white pepper. Apply the herb mix to both sides of the steaks. Then, cook them in two teaspoons of oil over medium heat. Meanwhile, saute peppers and onions in the remaining oil. When the steaks are done, drizzle them with the sauce.

You can also make Italian steaks inside the kitchen. Use a grill pan or a cast iron skillet over medium heat. Cooking times are similar to those of grilling. Make sure to keep an eye on the steaks while cooking. If possible, use a meat thermometer for accurate measurements. After cooking, let your steaks rest for at least 20 minutes before serving. This will let the juices and flavor of the steaks come out.

The preparation for authentic Italian steaks is different for each one. For example, the strip loin is not cut to tenderness in order to make a delicious steak, but it's also the simplest to prepare. Because it's a muscle that doesn't do much work, strip loin is often referred to as a New York steak. The strip loin comes with a bone. When cooked properly, it will have an almost perfect taste, and is much better than turkey dinner any day!

Another popular Italian steak is beef tagliata. This meat is grilled thinly. Traditionally, Italian steaks are served with red sauce, and are often spiced with cloves and nutmeg. The name “Philly cheese steak” comes from the fact that it's not Italian at all. But there are many similarities between the two. If you're looking for a traditional Italian steak, you should look no further than the famous Al's Beef restaurant in Chicago.

Getting the steaks marinated in advance is a must! The steak needs to be seasoned with pepper and seasoned salt. Then, it's time to pour the marinade on the steaks and place them in the refrigerator to set for a few hours. Once the steaks are marinated, they can be cooked to your preferred degree of doneness. You can also make an easy dipping sauce from Moore's Marinade and half a bottle of Italian dressing.

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Cooking Tips

How to Prepare the Best Baked Steak in Oven Recipes

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How to Prepare the Best Baked Steak in Oven Recipes

If you want to enjoy a juicy and delicious baked steak, you'll want to follow these tips. The main goal is to cook your steak to the right internal temperature – 160 degrees Fahrenheit, unless otherwise specified. You can determine how well cooked your steak is by using a meat thermometer – just insert it into the center of the steak to find out. After cooking your steak, rest it for at least 5 minutes before cutting it. Serve with butter for a delicious, healthy meal.

Serve this simple and delicious dish with your favorite green side. You can even pair it with rice or potatoes, if you'd prefer. In the Deep South, people may prefer to serve their steak with rice or potato mash. Season both sides with salt and pepper, and place them on a sheet pan or a hot grill. If you don't have a grill, you can even make this dish on the stovetop. The potatoes should be sprinkled with olive oil and seasoned liberally with salt.

Select a thick steak. Thin steaks will dry out when baked. Instead, choose one with good marbling. Choose ribeye, strip, or top sirloin steaks, or filet mignon. You can even serve mashed potatoes or green beans with this dish. And don't forget to serve it with a side salad or a green vegetable. When serving steak, it's best to pair it with a vegetable side.

Before cooking, remove the steak from the refrigerator. Season it with salt and pepper and allow it to sit for 30 minutes. Remove the steak from the refrigerator, and season it with a few drops of your favorite seasoning. When the steak is ready, heat a cast iron skillet over medium-high heat and place the steaks in batches, depending on size. Sear them on each side for one to three minutes. This process will make your steak juicy and tender.

For a delicious, juicy baked steak, first prepare a hot skillet. Sprinkle a little oil on it and place it in the skillet. Once it is lightly browned, flip it and continue to cook for another two minutes. Once cooked, use a meat thermometer to test the internal temperature of the steak. A steak is considered medium-rare when the internal temperature is 130 degrees or higher. If it is rare, the steak will be done when it reaches 140 degrees.

To cook a meat roast, you should begin by browning it on both sides with olive oil. You may need to add more oil if your meat is more dense. Then, add the rest of the ingredients. You can use a lighter oil for the meat if you don't like the taste of garlic. After the meat has browned, you should sprinkle it with garlic powder and pepper. Finally, add some beef base or soup to the pot and mix it with chopped onions and parsley. Once you've done this, you can bake it at 275 degrees for five hours. Remember, though, that the cooking time will vary depending on the thickness and quality of the meat.

To make a delicious, juicy, and tender steak, you'll need a good quality cut. Try USDA Select or choice grade beef. Choose Prime or Choice grades for the best taste and texture. Then, prepare it the way your favorite restaurant would. Start by sear it in a hot skillet. Then, transfer it to a preheated oven and bake until the steak is done. After the steak is done, it is ready to eat!

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Cooking Tips

How to Make Salisbury Steak Easy

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How to Make Salisbury Steak Easy

Salisbury steak is one of the easiest meat dishes to make at home. You can make it in just one skillet with a few basic ingredients. Beef patties should be browned in a skillet before being removed. Then, you can add Worcestershire sauce and bread crumbs. Cook the patties for a couple of minutes until they're done, then remove them and set aside. You can also substitute ground turkey or chicken for the beef.

To make Salisbury Steak easy to make, start by browning the patties before adding them to the crockpot. Browning them before putting them in the crockpot adds additional flavor and texture. However, it also requires additional time, cleaning up afterward. When making salisbury steaks, keep in mind that the USDA recommended temperature for ground beef is 160 degrees. To make them chewy, cook them until they reach this temperature.

To make the patty, combine ground beef and seasonings and shape into patties. In a pan, pour in about 8 oz. of tomato sauce and a half cup of water. Spread the mixture over a round steak. Bake it for 45 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. For health, Dr. Salisbury recommended eating beef three times a day. You can make a delicious, one-pan meal. Just remember to serve it with hot cooked rice.

The crock pot is a great option for making salisbury steak easy. The slow cooker cooks the seasoned ground beef patties to perfection. This is a perfect solution if you don't have the time to stand over a stovetop. After cooking the patties, transfer them to the crockpot and stir in the ingredients for the gravy. Once the meat is cooked, serve it with homemade mashed potatoes and your favorite vegetables.

Salisbury steak is not a healthy choice for everyone. You can make it healthier by replacing the ground beef with lean ground beef. Then, you can add sauteed vegetables and homemade stock to the mixture. It's a delicious, filling dinner for any occasion. And you can even make a version with chicken or pork instead of beef! There are plenty of ways to make it healthier – just make sure to choose your ingredients carefully!

To make salisbury steak easy to prepare, simply add meat, onions, and spices to a bread crockpot. Add a few slices of cheese, if desired. A small amount of mayonnaise will also help you cook the steak. For added flavor, you can also add mushrooms or shredded lettuce to the mixture. If you prefer a thicker mixture, add more vegetables, such as mushrooms. Then, add a little bit of tomato sauce.

Salisbury steak has been around for several centuries, but the recipe for this delicious meat has a rich and interesting history. During World War I, the American Navy changed the name of the dish to avoid being confused with “hamburger steak,” which sounded too German for Americans. The name has since become synonymous with the bun-less hamburger. The history behind the creation of this dish is fascinating. Once you have it down, you'll wonder how you lived without it!

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