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Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

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Schwenkbraten

I'm no master of German cuisine, and when I decided to host an Oktoberfest cookout of sorts, my first, and only, recipes I thought of were all of the wurst variety. I felt like I both wanted to cook and offer more than sausages to my guest, so did some research on other ubiquitous German grilled meats and came across schwenkbraten—marinated and grilled pork neck steaks. It seemed like schwenkbraten consisted of three things, all dubbed schwenker—the unique suspended swinging grill over a live fire for cooking, the person actually doing the grilling (or most correctly, the swinging), and the meat itself. Seeing as I had two out of three and, having never had schwenkbraten before, I was freed a bit of the confines of authenticity, it seemed like a decent choice to help fill out the menu with at least one thing that fit the theme was not an encased meat.

Schwenkbraten

To start this recipe off, I attempted to get some true pork neck steaks, and while pork neck wasn't all that difficult to find, procuring it in a steak fashion, and not cut into little pieces, was. So I did what I figured was the next best, and closet thing. I trimmed off half-inch thick steaks from a pork shoulder I was also using to make sausages. Seeing as the shoulder is pretty close to the neck and the steaks had a similar amount of fat and connective tissue, I felt good that this was the right direction.

Schwenkbraten

The flavoring of the marinade seemed a little bit like a cook's choice. I read recipes and watched some German Youtube video for research and what went into the sauce was wide and varied. Most everyone had oil (of course), garlic, juniper berries, and mustard. So I began there added in dried thyme and oregano for the herbal component that looked common, as well as paprika and cayenne for a touch of spice and heat.

Schwenkbraten

Onions also seemed a must, so I tossed one sliced onion into the marinade and coated it, along with the pork, in the liquid. My plan later was to make use of those onions by grilling them and using them as a topping for the sandwiches.

Schwenkbraten

Another hallmark of schwenkbraten recipes was a long marinade time. Seeing as there wasn't a whole lot in the marinade that would actually react with the meat to make significant changes over time, I question if that is really a necessity, scientifically speaking. I did marinate mine almost 24 hours since I prepared it the afternoon before the event, but I would imagine less time wouldn't produce dramatically different results. For good measure though, I left he ideal timing from overnight to two days in the final recipe.

Schwenkbraten

My major area of concern in making these was how they would turn out cooked over high heat. Pork shoulder, and neck, is full of fat and connective tissue that is chewy and tough when cooked quickly, but renders when cooked low and slow. If using a traditional schwenker, I assume the grilling is a bit slower than on a grill since the coals are further from the grill grate, but it's still hot and fast cooking and not what I was used to for shoulder meat.

Schwenkbraten

I must say though, they did grill up to be really beautiful. In just a few minutes per side, the thin steaks developed a nice sear with attractive browning and were also just cooked through, without being over done—so the hot fire did its job in this respect.

Schwenkbraten

Once the steaks were done and I had room on the grill again, I put a cast iron skillet over the coals and let it preheat for a few minutes. I then took the onions from the marinade and cooked them in the hot skillet until they were crisp-tender, which took about five minutes.

Schwenkbraten

And now for what's become a standard PSA of mine—if you're making sandwiches on the grill, use that massive space and heat source to grill your bread! That bread in this scenario were Kaiser rolls, which I toasted over direct heat until lightly browned, warmed through, and a bit crusty.

Schwenkbraten

I then turned my three grilled elements into sandwiches by topping each bun with a pork steak or two and a portion of the onions. Whether they tasted good was still a question, but they certainly looked great and very meat forward, which is how I imagine a lot of German dishes are.

Schwenkbraten

And the flavor was pretty great too. The marinade was powerful and lent a nice pungent and herbal profile to the meat and onions, along with a slight hit of heat. The pork itself was well cooked, but as I expected, there was a bit more chew to it than I'm used to. That's not to say that's a bad thing—there was no bit of this sandwich that was inedible—it was just different, and what I assume is all part of the experience. My main point of contention was the sandwiches felt a tad dry when taken altogether, but that's something a little spread of mustard or mayo could easily fix, and I would add that in if I were making these again. All-in-all though, they provided the non-wurst dish I was looking for and introduced me to something new that I now must seek out and try to see what real deal schwenkbraten is all about.

Schwenkbraten Sandwiches

A long stint in a herbed and spiced mustard marinade gives these German pork steak sandwiches an immense flavor.

  • Prep Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Inactive Time:
  • 4 Hours
  • Cook Time:
  • 10 Minutes
  • Total Time:
  • 4 Hours 20 Minutes
  • Yield:
  • 8 servings

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup canola oil
  • 2 tablespoons spicy mustard
  • 1 tablespoon Kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 4 juniper berries, crushed
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2lbs pork neck or shoulder steaks, cut 1/2-inch thick
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into 1/2-inch slices
  • 8 Kaiser rolls

Procedure

  1. In a small bowl, whisk together oil, mustard, salt, garlic, paprika, juniper berries, thyme, oregano, and cayenne pepper. Add in onion and steak and toss to thoroughly coat. Transfer to a large Ziploc bag, seal, removing as much air as possible, and place in refrigerator overnight to two days.
  2. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all the charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place porks steaks on grill and cook until browned and just cooked through, about 2 minutes per side. Transfer steaks to a cutting board or platter.
  3. Place a cast iron skillet on grill and let preheat for 2 to 3 minutes. Place onions in skillet and cook until slightly softened, about 5 minutes. Remove skillet from grill and set aside. Place rolls on grill, cut side down, and cook until warmed through and lightly toasted, about 1 minute.
  4. Transfer buns to serving platter or plates, top each bottom half with pork steaks and onions. Serve immediately.
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Basehor Bombs

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Basehor Bombs

My twist on this recipe: https://urbancowgirllife.com/texas-twinkies-recipe/Basehor
I like chedder cheese more than creamed cheese, so used that instead. Chilis smoked for 1 hr @225, chilled in cold water and drained. Layered in strips of sliced chedder,diced up brisket mixed with Jack Stacks BBQ sauce. I use thick cut bacon, wrapped 1 slice around stuffed jalapeños and sprinkled with
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By: loco_engr
Title: Basehor Bombs
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1228732/basehor-bombs
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Kimchi Burgers

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I enjoy making things just a bit different than the norm.  Had some kimchi and some burger and thought I do like Korean BBQ,  but don't have what I need,  but do for burgers.   So here's my go at the burger.  

Burger:

2lb Ground beef

1/4c Finely diced kimchi

1/4c caramelized onions

5 clove Korean pickled garlic
Drizzle Coconut nectar 



Mix together, rest in fridge to chill (30min)

Glaze:

1/4c Teriyaki

3tbsp Orange Juice

1tbsp Honey

Gochujang (to taste)
brush on while cooking for a nice glaze

Aiole:

1/4c Kweepee mayo

Toasted Sesame oil (drizzle)

Gochujang (to taste)

1-2 tsp Tamari
Coconut nectar (drizzle l

Cook:

Chilled parties onto direct grill.   Let cook 5 min baste, flip baste, etc

When done sprinkle with Sesame seeds.  They stick nicely to the glaze. 

Build:

Smear the roll, add pattie cover in thinly sliced cabbage,  drizzle aiole over cabbage cut and enjoy! 

By: 2BAMBAM4
Title: Kimchi Burgers
Sourced From: eggheadforum.com/discussion/1228687/kimchi-burgers
Published Date: 09/11/21

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Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto

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Sheet pan meals are all the rage these days, at least if you spend more than a biscuit over on Pinterest. The concept is simple. Place a bunch of ingredients on a cookie/baking sheet, throw it into the oven until everything is done. I took this concept to the grill (of course) and used some Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil so none of the delicious flavors stick to the pan and clean-up is a breeze. If you have a family and are looking for great weeknight meals that are easy to prep, cook and clean up, all the while getting your grilling fix, pay attention, this one is for you. Let’s get on with it and get to making our Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto. 

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto Ingredients:

8-10 Chicken drumsticks (legs)

Garlic and herb seasoning (substitute your favorite BBQ rub/seasoning)

1 roll of Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil

2 small golden potatoes chunked

1 sweet potato chunked

12 each mini-onions both purple and yellow

Garlic infused olive oil to coat (sub regular olive oil)

Salt to taste

Pesto – we used store bought but here’s a recipe you can make

Pesto Ingredients:

2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed

1/3 cup walnuts (can sub pine nuts which is the more traditional recipe)

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces)

3 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 cup olive oil

1/4 teaspoon salt, or more to taste

Pesto Instructions:

In a food processor add the basil and nuts and pulse a few times

Then add the garlic and cheese and pulse a few more times, making sure to scrape down the sides after every couple of pulses

Then start the food processor on a low speed and slowly pour in the olive oil until desired consistency, stopping occasionally to scrap down the sides with a rubber spatula

Add salt to taste

OK, now that we have our basil pesto (and we bought ours, so that’s perfectly acceptable), it’s time to get down to making this dish. And our recipe starts off this way:

Didn’t see that coming, did you?

We are going to tighten up that chicken skin just a bit. Start by boiling about a half-gallon of water and then placing 2-4 chicken legs in a colander in the sink:

Being very careful not to burn yourself, pour some of that boiling water over the chicken legs for 3-5 seconds and watch the skin shrink up:

Those two pics above are the exact same chicken legs. The top one is before the boiling water, the bottom is after. What we have done here is tightened the skin up. We basically pre cooked it. This helps to make sure the skin isn’t rubbery at the end of the cookout.

Repeat the process with all the chicken legs and then season them with salt and the garlic/herb seasoning:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Make sure to do both sides:

Now it’s time to prepare the pan itself. Start off by laying down a layer of Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil putting the dull side up (which is the non- stick side) onto a baking sheet:

Despite the way the light hit that foiled pan, I promise you that’s the dull side which is the non-stick side.

Now, let’s chop some potatoes and veggies. So, for this one we made a mistake. Not a huge mistake, but one we don’t want you to repeat. When we started cutting up the sweet potato and the gold potato, we found the orange sweet potato was REALLY dense. Particularly compared to the yellow potato. So we figured it would take quite a bit longer to cook. To compensate, we sliced each type of tuber differently. We sliced the sweet potatoes fairly thin and the yellow spuds quite a bit thicker:

Don’t do this. Cut them the same thickness. They cook at just about the same rate, density notwithstanding. Cut them both thin like the sweet potato in the pic above. If you cut them too thick, they will take longer to cook than the chicken, but even if you do, we have a way to compensate for that later. 

One other item that we thought was clever on our part, wasn’t all that clever. Notice the ingredient shot at the beginning of this post? See those different color carrots of different sizes? Notice how we have whole carrots and then the little baby carrots which are also in multiple colors? Well, once these carrots roast, they all look pretty much the same. Not identical, but they blend together pretty well. Same with the white and purple onions. The next time I make this, I’m using the little orange carrots and just one color onion. The multi color stuff looks fantastic in the raw ingredient shot, but in the grand scheme of things, they don’t have that much impact on the final dish.

Back to the recipe. 

So chunk up the ingredients and spread them onto the foiled baking sheet and then drizzle with garlic infused olive oil:

Then hit it with some salt and more of the garlic and herb seasoning:

Ready for the chicken and a smoke/heat bath:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Now let’s go find a grill. We preheated it to 400F:

And once inside, we set a probe thermometer to be able to monitor our progress:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

After 40 minutes, our chicken was at 160F. Our target is between 170F-180F. I know, I know. Chicken only needs to be 165F to be safe to eat. But that’s really the chicken breast. That dry white meat that we’re all sick of eating. The legs are dark meat and carry a higher fat content, which makes them taste better than chicken breasts. Not to mention that handy dandy handle that has been amazing us since we were all three years old. At 160F pull the chicken out of the grill and platter it, leaving the veggies in the smoker:

Why leave the veggies in there? Because my gold potatoes were still really firm. So I left my chicken legs out for about 10 minutes while I applied the basil pesto and let those taters soften up in the smoker. In the meantime, I had to thin out my store bought basil just a little bit, so I added some garlic infused olive oil:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Now it’s time to dunk the chicken legs:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with PestoGrilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

And here we have all our legs dunked and ready to go back into the heat:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Here’s a close up of those pestoed legs (not sure if that is a word, but it should be):

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Also, while someone was dunking chicken legs, someone else was flipping the veggies on the baking sheet. I’m just going to say that the Reynolds Wrap® Non Stick Foil was a life saver here. Had we used regular foil it likely would’ve torn in multiple spots. 

And now back on the grill:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

You see that stuff on the platter there. Don’t run that down the sink. That’s some serious flavor. Drizzle it over the food on the baking sheet:

Now close the lid:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

And when they hit between 170F-180F they are done:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Transfer the veggies to a platter and top with the legs. Make sure to drizzle all the juices from the baking sheet to the finished platter:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

And then serve:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

And clean up is this easy:

We also learned as we were researching this dish that there are baking sheets of all different sizes. A small sheet like this could be used to make individual Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

And I have to tell you, that the chicken was magnificent, but the potatoes really stole the show. They got crispy on both sides and were simply amazing:

Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Thighs with Pesto

Truth be told, I think I ate five of these chicken legs. Maybe six. We made more than one dish, so I didn’t hog them all, but I did mow down a bunch of these. With school back in session, and me being head of a family of six with four kids all in grade school/middle school, this is a perfect meal for the crowd that lives in my house. It came in just under an hour of cook time, with less than 10 minutes of prep and minimal clean up thanks to the Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil. I call that a win!

If you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them below or send me an email. 

I’m oh so proud that this post is brought to you by Reynolds Wrap®. I’ve been working with Reynolds Brands since 2016, but have been using their products during my cookouts since closer to 1996. Yeah, I’m that old. It fills me with pride that a company that I firmly believe in and have been using for multiple decades wants to work with me and be part of the silly stuff we do on the grill here at GrillinFools.com. Here were my first two recipes we worked on together. Hasselback Potatoes and What is the Texas Crutch. 

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Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto
Author: Scott Thomas
Recipe type: One Sheet Pan Meal
Cuisine: Barbecue
Prep time: 
Cook time: 
Total time: 

Serves: 4-5
 

This one sheet pan meal is as simple as it is delicious. We combine kid friendly chicken legs, potatoes, veggies, onions and some basil pesto to create Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto
Ingredients
1 Sheet Pan Meal
  • 1 roll of Reynolds Wrap® Non-Stick Foil
  • 8-10 Chicken drumsticks (legs)
  • Garlic and herb seasoning (substitute your favorite BBQ rub/seasoning)
  • 2 small golden potatoes chunked
  • 1 sweet potato chunked
  • 12 each mini-onions both purple and yellow
  • Garlic infused olive oil to coat (sub regular olive oil)
  • Salt to taste
  • Pesto-we used store bought but here's a recipe you can make
Basil Pesto
  • 2 cups fresh basil leaves, packed
  • ⅓ cup walnuts (can sub pine nuts which is the more traditional recipe)
  • ½ cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese (about 2 ounces)
  • 3 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon salt, or more to taste

Instructions
One Sheet Pan Meal
  1. Begin by boiling some water and place chicken legs, 2-4 at a time into a colander in the sink and pour boiling water over them for 3-5 seconds to firm up the skin.
  2. Season the chicken legs with salt and garlic and herb seasoning
  3. Heat grill to 400F
  4. Cover sheet pan with Reynolds Non-stick Foil with dull side up
  5. Chop and distribute carrots, potatoes, and onions onto sheet pan
  6. Drizzle with olive oil
  7. Season with salt and the garlic and herb seasoning
  8. Drizzle the veggies with garlic infused olive oil
  9. Place chicken legs on the sheet pan
  10. Place in the grill until the chicken reaches 160F
  11. Remove chicken from the heat, leaving the veggies in the grill if the potatoes have not softened yet, and dunk the legs into the basil pesto
  12. Replace the pesto dunked chicken legs onto the sheet pan, making sure to drizzle the remaining basil pesto from the platter over the food on the sheet pan
  13. Close the lid until the chicken reaches an internal temp between 170F-180F
Basil Pesto
  1. Place the basil and walnuts into a food processor and pulse a few times
  2. Add the garlic and cheese, pulsing a few more times making sure to scrape the sides with a rubber spatula every couple pulses
  3. Set the food processor on to a low speed, slowly drizzle olive oil into the pesto until desired thickness
  4. Add salt to taste

 

The post Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto first appeared on GrillinFools.

Author information

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas

Scott Thomas, the Original Grillin’ Fool, was sent off to college with a suitcase and a grill where he overcooked, undercooked and burned every piece of meat he could find. After thousands of failures, and quite a few successes, nearly two decades later he started a website to show step by step, picture by picture, foolproof instructions on how to make great things out of doors so that others don’t have to repeat the mistakes he’s made on the grill.

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By: Scott Thomas
Title: Grilled Sheet Pan Chicken Legs with Pesto
Sourced From: grillinfools.com/blog/2021/09/21/grilled-sheet-pan-chicken-legs-with-pesto/
Published Date: 09/21/21

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