Connect with us

Cooking Tips

Chapli Kebab

Published

on


When my wife suggested having kebabs recently, I imagined I'd be cooking meat on a stick because that's inevitably where one's mind goes when using the word “kebab.” With new recipes for the site always a priority, I set out to find or create something not previously covered here and began scrolling the interwebs and Instagram for inspiration. When I came across a video of chapli kebab being fried in a large pan on the street, I was immediately taken. I dug a little deeper and familiarized myself the best I could from video, words, and pictures with the different varieties of chapli kebab made in Afghanistan and Pakistan and knew this highly seasoned ground meat mixture was going to be right up my ally. So I gave it shot and was completely won over by these non-skewered little discs of beef that I can't say represent authenticity for sure, but they certainly deliver on immense deliciousness.

The variation in chapli kebab between the two countries seem mostly to be around the exact seasoning mixture, but they are also not that far separated in that arena. I assume there's differences from vendor to vendor as well, so I doubt there's one right answer, which gives me hope that my initial combination of spices that included coriander seeds, cumin seeds, black peppercorns, and pomegranate seeds, which I toasted and ground, was starting out on the right foot.

Advertisement

Chapli Kebab

The spices were just the beginning though, these kebabs had a ton of veggie mix-ins too—the chopping of all the onions, green chilies, tomato, cilantro, scallions, and garlic represented the most time and effort in this recipe. Once those were all prepped, it was quick to mix everything together with the high-fat ground beef plus the gram (chickpea) flour and egg used as binders.

Chapli Kebab

Once I had the mixture looking evenly distributed, I began portioning and shaping. I did this by breaking off roughly a 2-inch ball of meat and flattening it between my palms into a disc a little over three inches in diameter and about half an inch tall.

Chapli Kebab

Now frying in animal fat is the traditional way to cook these kebabs, but I figured they had to do well on the grill. That confidence was slightly defeated as I found they didn't grill with the ease I was imagining. The amount of veggies that went into the meat made it looser than things like meatballs and burgers, and that led the first couple patties I tried to flip to fall apart.

Chapli Kebab

I was able to avoid that folly going forward by ensuring the first side we very well seared before trying to move them at all. For something like a burger, this would make me nervous about uneven and potential overcooking, but I did want these kebabs cooked all the way through, plus a deep sear seemd to be the right course of action given chapli kebab is usually fried and get just as browned, if not more, in the hot oil.

Chapli Kebab

Once the patties were all done, I plated them up on fresh naan-e-afghani along with fresh sliced tomatoes, red onion, and lime wedges. I knew by just reading the ingredient list that I was going to love these, but I wasn't prepared for how much I was going to love them—for someone attracted to big flavors, these probably delivered the most flavor of any kebabs I've ever had. There was an upfront heat that had a great freshness to it which melded with the cilantro, scallions, and tomato. There was then a background sweetness that I attributed to the onions, while the spices gave that earthy quality which is common in a lot of Middle Eastern and Persian dishes. I didn't include the fresh veggies and bread accompaniments when I originally wrote up this recipe, but they felt so central to the meal as a whole that I thought they had to be added in to really deliver the full experience that brought me so much joy the day I made these chapli kebab.

Published on Thu Jul 29, 2021 by Joshua Bousel

Advertisement

Print Recipe

  • Yield 3-4 servings
  • Prep 20 Minutes
  • Cook 10 Minutes
  • Total 30 Minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cumin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon whole black peppercorns
  • 1 teaspoon dried pomegranate seeds
  • 1 pound ground beef (at least 20% fat)
  • 1 cup finely minced onion (about 1 medium onion)
  • 1/2 cup diced tomato
  • 1/3 cup finely minced fresh cilantro
  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped green chili (such as Anaheim or jalapeño)
  • 3 tablespoons finely minced scallions (about 2 scallions)
  • 3 tablespoons gram flour
  • 2 teaspoons finely minced fresh garlic (about 2 medium cloves)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
  • 1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  •  
  • For Serving
  • Sliced fresh vegetables (such as tomato, red onion, and cucumber)
  • 1 lemon or lime, wedged
  • Naan-e-afghani

Procedure

  1. Place coriander seeds, cumin seeds, black peppercorns, and pomegranate seeds in a small skillet set over medium-high heat. Toast until spices become fragrant, about 3 minutes. Transfer spices to a spice grinder or granite mortar and pestle and process into a coarse powder.
  2. Place beef in a large bowl and add in ground spices, onion, tomato, cilantro, green chili, scallions, gram flour, garlic, salt, crushed red pepper, and egg. Using hands, combine mixture until ingredients are evenly distributed. Break off a roughly 2-inch ball of meat mixture and flatten into a patty roughly 3-inches wide and 1/2-inch thick. Place patty on tray and repeat process until all meat has been shaped.
  3. Light one chimney full of charcoal. When all charcoal is lit and covered with gray ash, pour out and spread the coals evenly over entire surface of coal grate. Set cooking grate in place, cover grill and allow to preheat for 5 minutes. Clean and oil the grilling grate. Place patties on grill and cook until well seared on first side, 3 to 5 minutes. Flip patties and continue to cook until second side is well seared and meat is cooked throughout, another 3 to 5 minutes. Transfer patties to a serving platter and serve immediately with fresh vegetables, citrus wedges, and/or naan-e-afghani.

You Might Also Like

Advertisement

By: meatmaster@meatwave.com (Joshua Bousel)
Title: Chapli Kebab
Sourced From: meatwave.com/recipes/afghani-chapli-kebab-recipe
Published Date: 07/29/21

Did you miss our previous article…
http://amazinghamburger.com/outdoor-cooking/5-terrific-marinades-for-steak/

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Cooking Tips

Strip Steak Tacos Recipe – How to Cook New York Strip Steak Tacos

Published

on

Strip Steak Tacos Recipe – How to Cook New York Strip Steak Tacos

Strip steak makes an excellent meat for fajitas. These fajitas are easy to prepare and require little clean-up. The steak is already seasoned, so you don't need to marinate it before cooking. You can even freeze it for 30 minutes before you start cooking it.

If you plan on frying or baking the steak in tortillas, you should first marinate the steak before you begin cooking it. The marinating process will make it tender. Also, top sirloin steak is more tender than bottom sirloin. You can also purchase beef tenderloin, but it is more expensive than the other cuts.

First, heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add the onions and peppers. Cook until they are soft but not browned. Once they are soft, add the steak and stir-fry until it is no longer raw. Remember that the steak doesn't need to be cooked all the way; it will finish cooking when you add the vegetables.

Strip steak is a great option for fajitas because it has a great flavor and is easy to cook. Whether you want to use it in a taco or as part of a fajita, strip steak is easy to prepare. You can grill it to your liking and then serve it with grilled vegetables. You can even add your favorite toppings to it.

Once the steak has been marinated, you can cook it on a hot grill or cast iron skillet. For medium-rare steak, you should cook it for about four minutes per side. If you don't have a large enough skillet, you can cut the meat into thin strips.

In addition to flank steak, you can also use skirt steak for fajitas. Skirt steak is tougher than flank steak and requires more time to cook. It is also tougher to chew, but the flavor is more intense than that of flank steak. It can be served with grilled vegetables, salsa, and cilantro.

Strip steak is a higher-end cut of beef. It is made from the short loin subprimal and comes with the backbone, but the backbone is usually removed. The more marbling, the higher the quality. As a result, strip steaks are one of the most expensive cuts of beef.

Continue Reading

Cooking Tips

How to Prepare Crusted Steak With Lemon Butter Steak Sauce

Published

on

How to Prepare Crusted Steak With Lemon Butter Steak Sauce

Crusted steak is a popular dish at steakhouses, which is easy to make at home. You can grill or bake it, depending on your preference. First, you need to bring the steak to room temperature. Then, mix the crumbs with herbs and sprinkle them over the meat. Cook the steak until it is cooked to your liking.

When cooking steak, use a thermometer to check the temperature. The internal temperature should be at least 150°F. You can also add sea salt, if you want to. Continue to cook the steak until it reaches a perfect medium rare or well-done level. When you're finished cooking your steak, you can move it to the cool side of the grill away from the coals. It'll finish cooking slowly over gentle heat, ensuring that it is just right.

After heating the steak, prepare the butter. You'll need it for the final crust, which helps with the magic char. If you don't like butter, you can use beef tallow or butter alternatives. You can also brush the steak with melted butter on one side, then the other side. Remember to turn the steaks every few minutes to achieve the final crust. If you're not careful, you may end up with a burnt steak.

Peppercorns are also an essential ingredient for the crust of the steak, as they add additional flavor and texture. Crushed peppercorns can be crushed using a rolling pin, mallet, or spice grinder. You can also include tomato or balsamic vinegar to the mixture. If you have a conventional grill, you can use this method to cook steak on it.

If you're looking for an easy way to prepare a steak with a crispy crust, you'll want to try a Parmesan Crusted Steak. The combination of spices, herbs, and cheese in this recipe transforms the steak dining experience. Serve it with grilled vegetables and a glass of red wine to make the most out of it.

Another easy method for preparing a crusted steak is by using blue cheese. It adds a bit of texture to the steak and also helps bind the ingredients together. It also pairs well with balsamic-glazed caramelized shallots, which add a nice balance of flavors.

To prepare the steak crust, you first need to make sure you have a skillet large enough to accommodate the steak. After that, you can place the steak in the oven for a few minutes to get the bottom part of the steak hot. Once it reaches the desired temperature, it should rest for about five minutes before serving.

When preparing a steak crust, you should always consider the cut of beef you're using. It's important to choose a cut with the right fat and lean meat. You may also want to make the steak as thin as possible to reduce the risk of it being overcooked.

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Cooking Tips

Hawaiian Steak Recipe and Houston’s Hawaiian Ribeye Recipe

Published

on

Hawaiian Steak Recipe and Houston's Hawaiian Ribeye Recipe

Hawaiian steaks are made with tender slices of beef, juicy pineapple, and sweet mini peppers. These ingredients are marinated and grilled until tender. Hawaiian steaks can be served with potatoes, fresh vegetables, and a simple salad. If you're looking for a fast and easy dinner idea, Hawaiian steak kabobs are a great option.

To make Hawaiian steaks, you'll need Hawaiian seasoning salt. This seasoning mix contains ‘alaea salt, garlic, onion, and ginger powder. It's best if you apply the seasoning mix to the steaks at least 20 minutes before grilling. You can use Hawaiian seasoning salt for steaks, chicken, fish, and vegetables. Just remember to apply it liberally.

Hawaiian steaks can be cooked using a grill or on a barbecue grill. This method results in a juicy center and charred edges. The meat is best grilled in Hawai'i. Once you've cooked the beef, it can be stored in an airtight container for three to four days.

To prepare Hawaiian steaks, start by marinating the steak. You can use soy sauce, pineapple juice, apple cider vinegar, and garlic. Then, pour the marinade over the steaks and let them marinate for at least a day. You can also make the compound butter ahead of time and use it to cook the steaks.

Before grilling the steak, you should season it well on both sides. Heat a cast-iron pan on medium-high. Cook the steak for about two minutes on each side. Once finished, remove the steak from the grill and refrigerate it. Once the steak is cool, remove the excess fat.

To grill Hawaiian steaks, heat up a grill to medium-high or high. Grill the steaks until desired degrees of doneness are reached. The internal temperature of the steak should be 130F for rare steaks and 140F for medium-rare steaks. After the steaks are ready, you should transfer them to a cutting board and cover them with aluminum foil. Let them rest for 5 minutes before slicing.

The meat used in Hawaiian steaks is usually made from Spam, which is widely mocked on the mainland. It's also served with pineapple. Spam is eaten in about a third of U.S. households and was the winner of a state fair recipe contest. One Hawaiian state fair recipe even turned Spam into a nacho burger.

Did you miss our previous article…
http://amazinghamburger.com/cooking-tips/pork-chop-with-mushroom-sauce-for-pork/

Advertisement
Continue Reading

Tags

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Facebook

Trending

%d bloggers like this: