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5 Best barbecue sauces you can buy online

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Perhaps you can relate to this experience: You have just eaten some truly amazing ribs, coated with a shiny, sticky, sweet, smokey sauce. You ask your host what the secret is to such irresistible ribs, and you are met with an unapologetic smile and a shrug of the shoulders. It is immediately apparent that you’re not gaining access to that information any time soon.

You may think a secret barbecue sauce recipe has to be incredibly complex, with spices sourced from distant lands, and created over years of trial and error. But the truth is likely the opposite. A barbecue sauce bought from the local store or online; yes, straight from the bottle, could well be their secret. So simple, it is a little embarrassing.

So, I’ve put together a list of the best sauces you can get online, as well as some handy information to help you determine what the perfect sauce is for you, how to jazz up a boring sauce, and how to use barbecue sauce to create truly memorable barbecue.

 

Sweet Baby Ray’s Barbecue Sauce

A versatile, sweet barbecue sauce, this is the “go-to” product for many a barbecue aficionado, and consistently makes an appearance in lists of “best barbecue sauces”.


Sweet Baby Ray's Barbecue Sauce 2/40 Ounce

  • Award winning barbecue sauce
  • Squeezable plastic bottles
  • Twin pack (40 oz each)

Sweet Baby Ray’s is not only great for barbecuing pork, chicken and ribs, but can also be used if you plan on grilling, or cooking your meat in the oven. With so many applications, it is certainly a top notch sauce to have on hand.

This award winning Kansas City-Style sauce delivers the classic “barbecue sauce” flavor. So as long as you are not expecting a product that will redefine your concept of barbecue sauce, this could well be the sauce for you.

Sweet Baby Ray’s comes in a handy squeezable bottle, and is gluten free.

Flavor: Sweet, with a slight tang.

Main Ingredients: Corn syrup, vinegar, tomato paste, food starch, spices, juice concentrate.

This sauce is available in a 2 x 40 ounce pack, which is great news for Sweet Baby Ray fans, as they will go through this sauce like lightning.

 

Stubb’s Bar-B-Q Sauce

If you love Texas-style barbecue sauce, Stubb’s, which has been around since 1968, might just be the ticket.


Stubb's Bar-B-Q Sauce, Original, 18 ounce (Pack of 4)

  • A blend of tangy tomatoes, vinegar, and black pepper
  • Gluten Free and All Natural Ingredients
  • Real sugar – no high fructose corn syrup
  • Great with ribs, brisket, chicken, and more
  • Authentic Bar-B-Q Sauce since 1968

Thinner in texture and more sour and tart than sweet, this sauce will bring a real point of difference to your barbecue. With flecks of garlic and pepper visible, you know from the moment you lay your eyes on this sauce that you are in for something more complex than your usual sweet ketchupy barbecue sauce.

The makers of this sauce use all natural ingredients, and have opted to stick with real sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup.

Stubb’s comes in a glass bottle, giving the product an authentic, high end feel.

Flavor: Sour and tart.

Main Ingredients: Tomato paste, cane sugar, vinegar, molasses, brown sugar, salt and spices.

You can purchase Stubb’s in an 18 ounce bottle, and you can get them in a pack of 4 if you are a fan.

 

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que

If you are not so keen on your average sweet barbecue sauce that you can pick up in the local store, Dinosaur Bar-B-Que sauce is worth a try. Hailing from the famous Dinosaur Bar-B-Que in Saracyuse, NY, this sauce offers a more tomato based flavor, with just the slightest hint of heat.

This sauce performs just as well as a cooking sauce as it does as a barbecue sauce. It can be used on a variety of meats, making it a real all rounder.

This sauce is made of all natural products, and is gluten free.

Flavor: Tomato based flavor, with a tang.

Main Ingredients: Tomatoes, vinegar, sugar, mustard, spices.

You can get this sauce in a carton of 6 bottles, or in a pack of 3 online. The bottles are 19 ounces.

 

Bone Suckin Gourmet Foods BBQ Sauce

The good news for Bone Suckin Sauce fans out there— you can grab this sauce in a 64 ounce family pack. And given this sauce is a bit of a crowd pleaser, you will be glad to have a family pack to keep up with the demand. Sweeter and more in line with your classic Kansas-style barbecue sauce, this sauce will go well on any sort of meat.

This sauce is lower in sodium, and is not as strong in terms of flavor as other sauces. While some like their sauce to be packed with flavor, fans of Bone Suckin sauce appreciate that it does not overpower the flavour of the meat.

Bone Suckin is also made of all natural ingredients.

Flavor: Sweet and subtle.

Main Ingredients: Tomato paste, apple cider vinegar, honey, molasses, mustard, horseradish, lemon juice, onion, garlic and spices.

You can also grab this sauce in a 16 ounce 4 pack.

 

Cattleman’s Master’s Reserve Kansas City Classic BBQ Sauce

An old favorite of many barbecue fans, Cattleman’s Master is hard to find in stores these days. However, it can be found online; much to the relief of many barbecue lovers across the country. It is renowned as a well balanced sauce, with a nice level of spice.


Cattleman's Master's Reserve Kansas City Classic BBQ Sauce – 1 Gal. Jug

  • Cattleman's Master's Reserve Kansas City Classic BBQ Sauce – 1 Gal. Jug

Cattleman’s Master has more of a tang to it than other Kansas-Style sauces. While this is the very reason many love this sauce, you might like to try mixing Cattleman’s Master’s Reserve sauce in equal quantities with a slightly sweeter sauce such as Sweet Baby Ray’s barbecue sauce (either the original or the Honey BBQ variety) to create a sauce exactly to your taste.

While this sauce can be used on all meats, as well as pizza, Cattleman’s Master really comes into its own with pulled pork. Perhaps this is just the sauce you are looking for to create your signature pulled pork recipe.

Flavor: Tangy, and not as sweet as some other Kansas-style sauces.

Main Ingredients: Tomato paste, corn syrup, vinegar, molasses, salt, spices.

If you decide this is the sauce for you, you can grab it in a 1 gallon jug. Otherwise, it is also available in an 18 ounce bottle. This sauce is also gluten free.

 

What Makes a Good Barbecue Sauce?

While there is no way of categorically stating that a BBQ sauce is either “good” or “bad”, when deciding which sauce is right for you, or the right match for the meat you plan to cook, there are a few things you can look for to help you make a good choice.

For example, is the sauce the Kansas style or vinegar based? If you go for a Kansas style sauce, you can expect a thicker, sweeter sauce with a bit less spice. Typically, this style of sauce will come to mind when most Americans think of barbecue sauce, as this is the style you can easily get in a store.

If you prefer more heat, spice and tang, then perhaps you should try a vinegar based sauce, which is the type of sauce usually used in North Carolina and Texas.

While the texture of your sauce does not in itself determine the quality of the product, it will help you decide how to best use the sauce. Do you want to use it as more of a condiment? Then perhaps a thicker sauce will work best. Want to use it in a recipe? Then a thinner sauce will do the trick, especially if it packs a punch flavor-wise.

A great tip from seriouseats.com is to take into consideration the aroma of the sauce. As their grilling and sauce columnist states:

 

“You can have a perfectly cooked rib or pulled pork, but top it with an off-smelling sauce, and the whole thing becomes an unfortunate experience.”

 

How to Improve a Store Bought Barbecue Sauce

You have run out of your favorite barbecue sauce, and you have guests coming for dinner. The only option is to run down town and grab a bottle of underwhelming store bought barbecue sauce, which tastes like sweetened tomato paste, to be frank. Is this a monumental disaster? Not at all! There is plenty you can do to improve a store bought barbecue sauce.

The video below has some good suggestions.

 

Add spice and heat

If you are after a little more spice in an otherwise bland sauce, try mixing in some of your favourite hot sauce. Take it easy though, you don’t want to get the balance of flavor wrong. Mix a little together first and have a taste. If they seem to be a good match, pour your barbecue sauce in a bowl, and slowly add the hot sauce till you reach the sweet spot.

You can also add some heat to your sauce by mixing some chilli flakes or chilli powder into your barbecue sauce. Habanero and cayenne are great options which are easy to source in your local store, but don’t be afraid to experiment with other types of chilli.

To add spice, with some smoky flavor to boot, try adding some chipotle pepper to your sauce. This can be added in powder form. If you buy your chipotle peppers canned, just process the peppers into a paste and add that to your sauce. If you have the dried pods, rehydrate them by soaking them in water, then blend them up and add the paste to your barbecue sauce.

 

Add smoke

If you are after a smoky flavor without the extra spice that chipotle peppers bring, then try adding a pinch of dried cumin powder. Start with a small amount and add until you are happy with the result.

 

Add tang

Perhaps you feel that the balance is still out in your sauce, and it needs more of a tang. Try adding some vinegar. Again, add the vinegar slowly, a teaspoon at a time until you feel that the taste is just right.

Other spices that go well to improve a sauce are: ground mustard powder, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper. For more inspiration, check out the ingredients list of your favorite barbecue sauce, and try adding some of these.

Once you have your signature sauce just right, set it aside for around 30 minutes to let those flavors really combine.

You might just create something better than you can buy!

 

Tips for Using Barbecue Sauce

How Much Sauce Should I Use?

You don’t need to load up your meat with gallons of sauce to get a great result. Remember, the flavor of the meat and the smoke should really be the stars of the show. One or two coats of sauce on your meat while it cooks is enough. Meathead Goldwyn of Amazingribs.com gives a rough guide:

 

“A full slab of spareribs with the tips still on will need at least 3/4 cup of a thick sauce for both sides, a slab of St. Louis cut ribs will need 1/2 cup, and a slab of baby back ribs will need 1/3 cup.”

 

If your guests are big fans of barbecue sauce, you can always put some more sauce out on the table so they can top up if they like.

 

When Should I Apply the Sauce?

The sugar content in a barbecue sauce means that it can burn quickly. To avoid this, apply the sauce toward the end of the cook. This allows time for the sauce to heat and perhaps even caramelize, but not burn. Applying the sauce about 30 mins before the meat is ready to be taken off the heat is a good rule of thumb.

You can also “sizzle the sauce”. Just before you are ready to take your meat off the heat, coat it in sauce, and apply each side to direct, high heat for about 10 minutes. To ensure you don’t overcook the meat in the process, sizzling the sauce about 30 minutes before your cook would have finished will yield the best results for both the sauce and the meat.

Make sure you keep a very close eye on the meat if you decide to sizzle the sauce. Due to the sugar content, you could very quickly end up with a slab of meat coated in charcoal instead of a sweet, smoky glaze.

A word of warning— never reuse the leftover barbecue sauce that you used to coat your meat with. Even if your meat was almost cooked at the time you applied the sauce, there is still a risk that microbes and spores that live in un/undercooked meat could spread.

Use a separate bowl for the sauce you coat your meat with, and discard any sauce you don’t use to coat the meat with. Always place fresh, uncontaminated sauce on the table as a condiment.

 

Wrapping it up

A great barbecue sauce, expertly applied, can be that final touch that makes a meal truly memorable. Whether you are on the hunt for a great sauce you can use straight out of the bottle, or are happy to experiment and make your own exclusive secret sauce, I hope you have found this article helpful.

You may also want to check out our guide to the best barbecue rubs you can buy online.

Have you found a great brand of barbecue sauce that you think is worth sharing? Or do you have any questions that were not covered in this post? Be sure to leave a comment below. And if you found this article helpful, don’t forget to share!

The post 5 Best barbecue sauces you can buy online appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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BBQ Tips

How to Reheat Brisket (without making it dry)

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I love cooking brisket. Especially a whole packer style brisket.

The problem is that once my family (and dog) have eaten our full, there’s usually still a few pounds of meat leftover.

And if you’ve ever tried to reheat leftover brisket you’ve probably noticed that it tastes nothing like the delicious smoked brisket you were enjoying the day before.

If you’re sick of leathery leftover brisket, keep reading. In this guide you’ll learn the 3 best ways to reheat brisket as well as a few secrets the barbecue pro’s use to keep their brisket moist.

How to Store and Freeze your Brisket

How you freeze your brisket largely depends on the answer to the following question:

Do you slice your brisket before your after you freeze it? Let’s have a look at the pros and cons of both.

Slicing Before you Freeze

Pro’s:

  • Slicing your brisket and freezing the slices so they can be reheated individually is very handy if you only need to reheat a couple of slices at a time.
  • Brisket slices will not take up as much room in your freezer as a whole brisket will.

Con’s:

  • If you’re not careful, you can be left with dried out brisket when you freeze it in slices.
  • Because the meat is sliced, there is more surface area that could be exposed to contamination. Maintain high hygiene standards, and put the slices into the freezer as soon as they are prepared to avoid this issue arising.

Slicing After you Freeze

Pro’s:

  • The brisket will retain a lot of its moisture if it is frozen whole.
  • There is less chance of contamination as the exposed surface area is reduced.
  • Slicing a whole, reheated brisket looks “fresher” than serving up pre-sliced brisket.

Con’s:

  • Will take up more room in your freezer.
  • You will have to reheat it all in one go, and this will take longer then reheating slices.

How to keep your brisket as moist as possible

  • If you chose to slice before you freeze, let the brisket cool while sitting in its own juices. This will ensure it retains as much moisture as possible.
  • Freeze the slices on a flat sheet of baking paper initially. This will allow them to freeze separately. Once they are frozen, pop them in a ziplock bag. Now you will be able to take them out separately as you need them.
  • Malcom Reed of howtobbqright.com suggests letting the brisket rest, then separating the fat out of the cooking juices, leaving the quality au jus behind.
  • Then, after placing the whole brisket and the au jus into a foil food service pan, he vacuum packs the whole thing, pan and all, making reheating, with juices and all, a breeze.

 

The Best Ways to Reheat Brisket

There are a few ways you can reheat a brisket. Depending on how much time you have, or how you froze the brisket in the first place, the best way to reheat will differ.

A Word on Food Safety: It is important to check the temperature and not the clock when reheating. The internal temperature of the meat needs to reach 160°F for it to be safe to eat.

Similarly, when reheating a whole brisket in the oven or the smoker, make sure you have let it defrost properly first. This means letting it defrost for around two days in the fridge.

While you can also thaw meat in cold water baths, thawing in the fridge is the easiest way to thaw your meat without losing too much moisture, and without leaving your meat in the “danger zone” of 40-130°F.

 

1) Reheating Brisket in the Oven

If you have frozen your brisket whole, the oven is probably the quickest and easiest way to reheat your meat.

  • Preheat the oven to around 325°F.
  • Once the brisket has defrosted, and the oven has reached temperature, pop the brisket in the oven and cover it with foil. Two layers of foil is even better if you want to be sure that there are no holes in the foil. Holes in the foil will lead to dried out meat.
  • Your brisket should be ready in about an hour, once the internal temperature has hit
    160° F

When reheating in the oven, there is the tendency for the meat to dry out. To avoid this, either make sure the original cooking juices are still in the bottom of the cooking tray, or add some moisture.

One suggestion is to reduce two cups of apple cider or apple juice by half, add a couple of tablespoons of your favorite barbecue sauce and pour that mixture into the bottom of the pan. You can use this as a sauce once the brisket is reheated.

 

2) Reheating in your Smoker

Once the meat is thawed out, you may also choose to reheat it in your smoker.

Reheating in the smoker is much the same as reheating in the oven, only it will take longer.

Meathead Goldwyn, of amazingribs.com suggests the following method in his guide to reheating leftovers

  • Heat your grill to 225°F
  • Use the 2-Zone cooking setup for reheating
  • Sit your foil-wrapped brisket in the indirect zone until the internal temperature of the meat reaches 155°F
  • Unwrap the brisket and finish it off over the direct zone for around 5-10 minutes. Make sure you check that the internal temperature has reached 160°F before serving.

Keep an eye on your meat to make sure it does not burn when it is over direct heat.

If you are cooking on a gas grill, setting it to medium heat should be about right for reheating.

 

3) Using the Sous Vide Method to Reheat your Brisket

This method is great because you will never dry out or overcook  the brisket when reheating it this way. We have to give credit to foodfirefriends.com for the idea to use sous vide to reheat brisket.

If you haven’t heard of sous vide before don’t worry. It sounds fancy, but sous vide is just another word for a water bath. It’s a pretty interesting method for cooking that’s been growing in popularity over the last few years.

Check out the video below if you’re interested to learn more.

The downside is that you need the right equipment for this method. It also isn’t the quickest way to reheat your brisket.

Here is a run down of how it works:

  • Meat is vacuum sealed in an air and water tight plastic wrap
  • Water temperature is between 110-175°F
  • Meat is left in the water bath until the internal temperature of the meat reaches the same temperature as the water bath.

For a whole brisket which is around 4 inches thick, this will take around five hours. For pre sliced brisket around two inches thick, it will only take two hours.

While there are very specialised thermometers out there to check the meats internal temperature when cooking or reheating this way, they are not commonly used outside of commercial kitchens.

For reheating brisket you can use the time suggestions in this guide

 

What About Boiling or Microwaving Leftover Brisket?

You may feel tempted to whack the brisket in the microwave, as it is an indisputably quick way to reheat food.

Trouble is, microwaving works by turning the water molecules into steam. Essentially the brisket will be steamed from the inside out.

This will leave you with dry, rubbery and downright horrible meat. Plain old waste of a brisket if you ask us.

How about boiling? Boiling a brisket that is wrapped in an airtight covering can have pretty good results. Similar to the sous vide method, the meat doesn’t dry out.

The trick is ascertaining the internal temperature of the meat, as you will still have to ensure that it has reached at least 160°F for it to be safe to eat. While there are sous vide cooking charts, they will not generally reach the water temperatures when boiling.

Thus, ensuring the meat has reached a safe internal temperature is a concern when boiling meat to reheat it.

 

What to do with your Leftover Brisket

If you are open to trying something different, there are countless ways you can use leftover brisket, and you can find a whole stack of them in this roundup of leftover brisket recipes.

But just to give you some inspiration, here are some of our favourite ideas:

  • Shepherd’s Pie or Cottage Pie: Technically, the beef version of this recipe should be called cottage pie, but that is irrelevant. Using cut up chunks of your leftover brisket in this classic recipe not only yields delicious results, but also makes for a quick, easy and filling midweek meal.
  • Quesadillas or Tacos: If you have any tortillas laying around, the addition of leftover brisket is a match made in heaven. Keep it simple with cheese and sauce, or jazz it up with toppings such as pickled onions and avocado sauce.
  • Beef Stroganoff: Creamy, hearty and filling, beef stroganoff is a family classic. And if you have leftover brisket it is quick and easy to whip up too.

 

Wrapping It Up

We hope you have enjoyed our guide to reheating brisket. Brisket yields such a good amount of tasty meat that knowing how to freeze, reheat and reuse it means you can get the most out of this delicious cut.

What do you find is the most convenient way to freeze and reheat brisket? Or do you have any questions that were not covered in this post? Let us know in the comments section below. And if you found this article helpful, be sure to share.

The post How to Reheat Brisket (without making it dry) appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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9 Leftover Beef Brisket Recipes

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After smoking a brisket, no matter how lip smacking delicious it was, there are almost always leftovers. A brisket yields a lot of meat.

If you are looking for some ideas for how to use your leftover brisket, then check out this list of 9 great ideas to get your mouth watering (again).

1) Brisket Grilled Cheese Sandwich (You won’t need an afternoon snack if you have this for lunch)

spicysouthernkitchen.com

Think of all the very best comfort food items. Creamy, melted cheese perhaps? How about warm crispy bread, lightly toasted? And don’t forget juicy, flavor packed beef, smoked to perfection. Can you imagine all of these things combined into one?

Welcome to the brisket grilled cheese sandwich.

After all the work you put into smoking that delicious brisket, it’s nice to make something really easy the next day.

You only need two or three slices of brisket to make this special sandwich, and you can have this warm, filling meal ready in around 15 minutes.

Ingredients:

  • 8 slices Italian bread or Texas toast
  • butter
  • 1 cup heaping shredded Cheddar cheese
  • 1 cup heaping shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 2-3 slices leftover brisket, shredded

You can find the recipe for the brisket grilled cheese sandwich here.

 

2) Breakfast Brisket Hash

traegergrills.com

Not only is this hash a delicious way to use your leftover brisket, it is also loaded with protein. If you feel like a lazy morning, this meal will likely cover you for both breakfast and lunch.

This meal hails from Ireland originally, and there surely is nothing more comforting on a fresh morning than the smells of brisket, peppers, onion and garlic sizzling away in the pan.

The ingredients in this dish are readily available, and if you can cook yourself a great brisket then whipping up this breakfast hash will be a breeze.

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups beef brisket, cooked and shredded
  • 2 cups hashbrown potatoes, cooked
  • 3 eggs
  • 1/2 cup green bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 1/2 cup yellow onion, diced
  • 3 tbsp canola oil
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 tsp. pepper

Grab the recipe here, and call all your friends around for a delicious, lazy Sunday breakfast.

 

3) Four Ingredient Breakfast Quesadillas (you can have these ready in 20 mins!)

heidishomecooking.com

If last nights barbecue left your cupboards a bit bare, there is nothing to fear. These breakfast quesadillas only require 4 ingredients, and even they are negotiable.

For instance, if you have some other meat left over that you want to use up, it will taste great as well.

Similarly, it doesn’t matter exactly what sauce you have floating around, as long as you have enough to generously coat that meat, then all is good.

Aside from that, all you need is some cheese and tortillas, and you’re good to go.

Ingredients:

  • 12 burrito-sized tortillas
  • 1-2 lbs brisket
  • 1-2 cups BBQ sauce
  • 16 oz shredded Colby Jack cheese
  • Cooking Spray

Check out the recipe here and play with it according to what’s in your cupboards.

 

4) Smoked Brisket Shepherd’s Pie with Jalapeno Cheddar Mashed Potatoes

countrycleaver.com

Just by reading its name you can tell this is a proper recipe in its own right. If you find yourself needing to entertain back to back, then have this one at the ready.

With the addition of carrots, broccoli, peas etc there is a fair serving of veggies in this dish. Now I am not going so far as to say it falls into the “health food” category, but “hearty” would be a fair description.

The jalapeno cheddar mash is a great twist on a classic mashed taters as well.

Ingredients:

  • 2 pounds Chopped Smoked Brisket
  • 3 Carrots, sliced or chopped evenly
  • 1 head Broccoli, cut into bite sized florets
  • 2 cups frozen Mixed Vegetables, corn, peas, etc
  • 1 Red or Sweet Onion, minced
  • 2 Tbsp Butter
  • 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • 1 ½ cup Beef Broth
  • 3-4 Tbsp Flour
  • 2 pounds baby red potatoes, quartered
  • 1 ½ cups shredded Cheddar Cheese
  • 1 jalapeno finely minced, seeds removed for less heat
  • 4 Tbsp Butter, cut into cubes
  • ½ cup Sour Cream
  • ¼ cup Whipping Cream or Half and Half
  • 3 cloves Garlic, minced
  • Salt and Pepper to taste

Planning of a big weekend of entertaining? Then head down and grab your brisket, and while it is smoking, check out the smoked brisket shepherd’s pie recipe here.

 

5) Beef Brisket Street Tacos

rockymountaincooking.com

Tacos are the perfect size meal if you want something that fills you up yet is not going to leave you with (more) leftovers. Make just as much as you want and eat it when you feel peckish.

This recipe calls for pickled onions. Of course you can grab them right off the store shelf, but for those who love a bit of DIY, the recipe for pickling the onions is included in the recipe for the tacos.

Aside from frying up the brisket and whipping up the avocado cream sauce (which sounds amazing) there is nothing much else to do than heat up the tortillas, then pile those ingredients on.

Ingredients:

  • olive oil
  • 2 cups leftover brisket or pot roast (click on link in post for the brisket recipe)
  • ½ cup chopped green chilies
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • ⅛ tsp Cheyenne pepper
  • 1 tsp Mexican oregano
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 tsp pepper

Get the recipe here.

 

6) Brisket Stroganoff (ultimate comfort food in 30 minutes)

apleasantlittlekitchen.com

The mention of beef stroganoff (or brisket stroganoff, in this case) brings to mind the words creamy, meaty, and buttery.

Pile it on pasta, or mash, and you are in for a real treat.

Generally, the ingredients in this dish are those you would typically have on hand, but you might want to check that you have some Chianti, as it is required along with worcestershire sauce to deglaze the pan.

Ingredients:

  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 1 cup onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves, chopped
  • 1 1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons tomato paste
  • 2 tablespoons worcestershire sauce
  • 1 1/2 cups Chianti
  • 2 1/2 cups chopped smoked brisket, click here for recipe
  • 3/4 cup sour cream (room temperature)
  • cooked egg noodles (or your favorite pasta)
  • fresh parsley, chopped (for topping)

Have a look at the recipe here.

 

7) Leftovers Cottage Pie

homeandplate.com

Not only will this classic cottage pie recipe work beautifully with brisket, but also with leftover lamb, chicken or even that ground beef you need to defrost and use before it expires.

Really, though, we are mainly interested in making it with leftover brisket, as the flavor packed into the brisket, along with the easily shreddable texture of the meat after smoking it makes it a pleasure to cook with.

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups cooked leftover beef brisket or roast, shredded and chopped
  • 3 cups mashed potatoes (leftover or store-bought)
  • 1 cup frozen vegetables
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons butter
  • 2 tablespoons flour
  • 1 cup beef broth
  • 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

If you are looking for a quick, filling and tasty midweek meal that everyone will enjoy, check out the recipe here and pull out the leftover brisket ready to go.

 

8) Smoked Beef Brisket Chilli (expertly paired with the perfect wine – if your out of beer)

vindulge.com

This is more than just a tasty chilli, it is an award winning chilli! So brace yourself for something special when you serve this one up.

This recipe plays to the smoky flavors you can expect from a brisket, with the addition of bacon and chipotle sauce giving this chili a truly distinctive flavor profile.

There is quite a bit of spice in this recipe. If you aren’t a fan of too much heat, perhaps hold back a little at first, and add more spices as you go. After you have cooked this one a couple of times you will find the sweet spot.

Ingredients:

  • 3 slices of bacon, diced
  • 1 large onion, about 2 cups, chopped
  • 1 red bell pepper, chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely diced
  • 2 ½ cups leftover smoked beef brisket, cut up into 1-inch cubes
  • 3 tablespoons chili powder*
  • 1 tablespoon cumin
  • ½ tablespoon dry chipotle seasoning** or the equivalent in canned chipotle in adobo sauce, adjustamount to your heat preference. A little goes a long way
  • ½ tablespoon smoked paprika
  • 1 12 oz bottle beer
  • ¼ cup coffee, cold leftover coffee from your morning pot
  • 1 15 oz can diced tomatoes
  • 1 15 oz can tomato sauce
  • ½ can black beans, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • ½ can kidney beans, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • ½ can corn, drained and rinsed, used a standard 15 oz can
  • 1 small, 4 oz can diced green chili

You can find the recipe here. If you are feeling extra fancy, scroll down past the chili recipe to discover the perfect wine to accompany it.

 

9) Sweet and Spicy Brisket Baked Beans

addapinch.com

Reimagine baked beans with the addition of spices, sauces and of course leftover brisket.

Far from an emergency dinner on toast, these baked beans are liable to steal the show next time you have a family dinner.

All you need to do is chop up some extra veggies for heat and flavor, squeeze in some sauces for richness and a little bit of sweet and of course add the brisket to beef them right up.

Let them bubble for around 45 minutes and you have an absolutely mindblowing side dish – or meal. Up to you.

Ingredients:

  • 3 1/2 cups prepared baked beans or 1 28-ounce can
  • 1 medium onion chopped
  • 1/2 tablespoon stone ground mustard
  • 1/4 cup molasses
  • 1 pound smoked brisket chopped
  • 3 tablespoons ketchup
  • 1 bell pepper seeded and chopped
  • 2 jalapeno peppers seeded and chopped
  • salt and pepper

Find the recipe here.

 

Wrapping it up

There is so much more you can do with leftover brisket than whack it on a sandwich (although that is delicious too).

Follow these recipes to the letter, or simply use them as some inspiration the next time you find yourself blessed with leftover brisket.

If this post has inspired you to cook a brisket, we’ve got some great guides to help out:

We hope you found this article helpful. Do you have any other great leftover brisket ideas? Let us know in the comment section below. And if you like our list, be sure to share it!

The post 9 Leftover Beef Brisket Recipes appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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BBQ Tips

Should You Cook Brisket Fat Side Up or Down?

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There are some topics in the world of barbecue that have never really been put to bed. Whether to cook your brisket fat side up or down is one of them.

If you are new to barbecuing, this may be a burning question that you have not been brave enough to ask out loud.

Or, it could be that there are so many conflicting opinions out there that you have given up on finding a straight answer.

Let’s get to the bottom of this.

What Is the Debate About?

Briskets have two distinct sides – one is covered in fat, and another is bare meat.

Aside from these two distinct sides, briskets are made up of two distinct muscles. The Point and the Flat. The pointed end tends to have a thicker covering of fat, while on the flat end the covering of fat is a little thinner.

Sometimes pitmasters will cut the brisket in half before they cook, but most times it’st best left whole.

But the real point of contention, is which way that fat should be facing. Up or down.

 

Why Cook Brisket Fat Side Up?

Advocates of cooking fat side up claim that the fat will “melt” into the meat, making it moist and juicy.

However, this is a myth.

The truth is that meat cannot absorb fat. Instead, the fat melts and runs off the meat into the drip pan, taking any seasoning you may have put on the meat with it.

To make matters worse, cooking fat side up won’t leave your brisket looking its best.The fat will not form a uniform bark like the bare meat would, leaving you with a not-so-appetizing looking brisket.

However cooking brisket fat side up is not a complete no no. If you use a horizontal offset smoker, or any other smoker wherein the heat comes from above, cooking fat side up is the way to go.

We will have a closer look at why under the section “Where is your heat coming from?”

 

Why Many Say Fat Side Down is Better

Most of the time, the fat side down team have got it right.

Because the fat is on the bottom, when it melts it will not wash the seasoning away, and the bark retains all the flavors you added.

Additionally, the smoke produced as the fat hits the hot coals will add a great flavor to your meat.

In most cookers, the heat comes from underneath the meat. Fat acts as an insulator. So as your meat cooks it is protected from the intense heat of the fire by the fat that does not melt away. As a result, your meat doesn’t dry out.

Also, the top of the brisket will form a uniform bark, leaving you with a brisket which looks great.

 

Where’s your heat coming from?

We have touched on this already, but when deciding whether to cook your brisket fat side up or down the determining factor really is the origin of the heat for your cooker.

Most of the time, the heat comes from the bottom (like on a Weber Smokey Mountain Bullet Smoker), so fat side down is the way to go.

But there are exceptions.

For example, horizontal offset smokers send the heat in from above. In that case you want to use those insulative properties of the fat cap to shield the meat from the top. Thus, fat side up is the way to go.

So have a look at your cooker, determine where the heat is coming from and you are most of the way to working out which way to sit your brisket.

It is still a good idea to check that the unprotected side of the meat is not drying out. If it is, you can always wrap the brisket in foil or butchers paper roughly halfway through the cook.

 

What The Pros Say About Fat Up or Down

You can find experts who sit on both sides of this debate. But now that we know that it largely depends on the type of cooker you use, this makes sense.

For instance, Malcom Reed of ‘How To BBQ Right.com’ likes to cook his everyday ‘eating’ briskets fat side up.

He explains his reason why like this:

Malcom Reed, Easy Smoked Brisket Recipe

“At a contest I would cook brisket fat side down the entire time. But you have to remember with my competition briskets I’ve trimmed off most of the fat, and I’ve injected it with at least 16oz of liquid….

For this “Eating Brisket” we’re not worried about the extra fat or what it looks like after it’s cooked, so I’m going to cook it fat side up the entire time.

I want the final product to have a “beefy” flavor but not be enhanced or artificial. ”

We had a look at the smoker he used in the recipe, and it does appear to be a horizontal offset style smoker, so the direction from which the heat comes in has likely also had a role in this decision.

Similarly, Aaron Franklin, known for cooking a mean brisket, goes fat side up.

However, he also uses an smoker with a heat source from above. You can follow Aaron Franklin’s Brisket Guide here.

But the fat does have a flavor all of its own, and when it drips onto the coals it can impart that flavor to the meat. Meathead Goldwyn, of amazingribs.com says:

“And what about the fat dripping into the fire and being resurrected as flavorful droplets mixed in with smoke? I save the fat cap and put it on the grate over the fire and let it drip away.”

Cooking your brisket fat side down will have a similar outcome, with the fat dripping directly onto the hot coals, and the resulting smoke flavoring your meat.

Wrapping It Up

So no, there is not a ‘one size fits all’ answer to this question of fat up or fat down.But we have discovered some vital facts.

No, the fat will not penetrate your meat as it melts, but it will wash off your rub.
Yes, the smoke coming off the melted fat hitting the coals will flavor your meat.

And yes, the fat will act as an insulative barrier between the heat source and the meat, protecting it from drying out.

The long and short of it? Know your smoker, identify where the heat is coming from, and place the fat cap between the heat and the meat.

We hope you have found this article helpful. Do you have any additional questions or suggestions? Make sure you let us know in the comments section below. And if you did enjoy this article, be sure to share it!

The post Should You Cook Brisket Fat Side Up or Down? appeared first on Smoked BBQ Source.

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